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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - January 31, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOLXUXNo.77 26 A. B WIS., SATURDAYS ANUAIY AMOCIATSD PUB WIRE sntviat Price Seven Cents High Seas, Wind, Ice Hamper Hunt for Ship AP This Low-Level Airview shows firemen pouring water on the Glen Ellyn Acres nursing home in Glen Ellyn, 111., after fire raced through the 2-story structure Fri- day. Authorities said faulty wiring in the 25-year-old structure may have caused the fire. Most of those who died were trapped in the building when part of the roof collapsed. Seek Cause of Nursing Home Fire Which Killed 9 Persons Blame Blaze For Death Of Fireman Glen Ellyn, 111. In- vestigators probed the ruins of a fire-ravaged nursery home today in the wake of a quick spreading blaze that claimed the lives of eight el- derly patients. The death of a volunteer fireman also was attributed to the fire yesterday that swept the Glen Ellyn Acres Nursing- home. Twelve other patients were saved by heroic efforts of passersby, firemen and nurs- ing home employes. Two pa- tients were seriously injured and hospitalized. Another Tragedy Authorities, grimly remind- ed of the Dec. 1 fire that took 93 lives at Our Lady of Angels parochial grade school in nearby Chicago, said faulty wiring might have caused yesterday's blaze. Mrs. Pearl Beard, owner of the Du Page county landmark built in 1934, said she had some repair work done Thurs- day on the wiring system aft- er several circuits had blown fuses. Last year, she said she spent on rehabilitating the wiring. The dead ranged in age from 67 to 90. The charred bodies of several victims were found in smoldering beds. Some victims managed to get only a few feet from their beds before the flames engulf- ed them. Most of the dead were trap- ped when a portion of the roof collapsed. Glen Ellyn's assistant fire chief, Dpnald Stoffregen, 58, suffered a heart attack shortly after arriving at the scene. He died a few moments later. Wine Tasters Always In Spirit of Things All in a Day's Work Sacramento, Calif., What happens when 76 wine tasters get together? Wjiy, they try to get into the spir- it of the thing. The tasters, 75 men and a woman, were tested Fri- day as potential judges for the state fair. Twenty will be selected. They began by identify- ing varieties of white ta- ble wine. Eight hours later they were still strgaith-leg- ged and clear-eyed as they evaluated the relative qual- ities of five brandies. Overdo It? Do tasters ever overdo it? Dr. George L. Marsh, of the department of food technology at the university of California, has been a wine judge since 1935. "I've never seen a taster drunk at the he said, "but wait until the testing is over. When we relax any- thing can happen." The lone woman, Mrs. Sanford Plainfield of Ala- meda, was shocked at the thought. "Everyone in my family has been a wine drinker all my life and I've never seen any of them drunk." The tasters came from all over the state to match pal- ates. Dr. Salvatore Lucia, head of the department of pre- ventative medicine at the University of California, said "it's all a matter of taste. Just like with girls. Some like blondes, some like redheads." Dr. Marsh, asked why he participates, shrugged and replied: Just Like It "Darned if I know. I just like it." Dr. Maynard Amarine, chairman of the depart- ments of viticulture and en- ology at Cal, arranged the tests. Viticulture is the study of grapes, enology is ttie study of wine. The tasters went through 30 cases of wine and bran- dy. Deny Appeal Of Officer Rebel Court Rules Batjstaman Must Face Firing Squad Havana Former ar- my Capt. Pedro Morejon to- day awaited execution as a Glen Ellyn, 35 miles west criminal after his appeal Chicago, has a volunteer de- partment. Damage Damage to the structure was estimated in excess A was denied by Cuba's su- Democrats May Push for More Defense Funds Washington cratic attempt to A Demo- accelerate AF A Mother and Her Two children escaped without in- jury Friday morning when a gas explosion ripped open this suburban home near Rochester, N. Y. Investiga- tion is being made as to how gas leaked into the house. Cold Wave Adds Chills to Fox Cities Area Mercury Drops 41 Degrees Overnight, 12 Below at 8 a.m. A fresh blast of Arctic air poured into Wisconsin Friday night sending the Fox Cities into another deep freeze peri- od. No relief is in sight for the weekend. The temperature dropped to 12 below between 7 and 8 o'clock this morning, the cold- est reading of the period. That was down from a high of 29 on Friday. The mercury could climb no higher than 7 below by 11 o'clock this morning. Wide Range The numbing cold blast, parading behind a series of chilling wintry punches, shook the mercury into a downward plunge below zero over the northern plains, the Mississippi valley and parts of the midwest. The cold movement, which penetrated as far south as Texas was borne with gusty winds. Forecasters indicated the cold will not abate at least until Monday and then only slightly. Lows in Wisconsin tonight will range from 10 to 20 be- low. The Fox Cities may ex- pect about 15 below. Unofficial readings as low as 20 below zero were report- ed from scattered areas around Appleton, Neenah and Menasha. See Move to Repeal Tax Secrecy law Madison Legislation that would repeal Wisconsin's income tax secrecy law is be- ing prepared for introduction in both houses of the legisla- ture, Sen. Horace Wilkie, D- Madison, said Friday. At the same time, Assem- bly Speaker George Molinaro, D-Kenosha. said a bill is be- ing readied that would ban public inspection of relief rolls. The rolls have been open to the public since 1955, the same year income tax re- turns'were made secret. Wilkie said the repeal measure will be sponsored in1 very optimistic about dealingiment the senate by two Milwaukee'with the Russians. "will Danish Craft With 90 to 130 People Aboard Feared Lost Off South Tip of Greenland Halifax, N. S. Wl High whistling winds seas and hampered search today for the Danish ship Hans Hedtoft, feared lost after hitting an iceberg off the south tip ofi ed the area through the night. Just before daylight there was still no trace of the missing Danish vessel. The Kruess radioed the ap- proaching U. S. coast guard German trawler cutter Campbell: Johannes Kruess reported she "Have searched, nothing could find no trace of the car-1 found or seen, no lights or ship with from j lifeboats or ship. 90 to 130 persons aboard in the area given by the vessel in her final SOS yesterday, the ship "Plenty ice irom northwest we must go. We are be- coming ice bound The message said was slowly sinking. A U. S. navy radar patrol plane circled above the 20- when about foot waves in the north Atlan-i tic and found no trace of ship or lifeboats. Ice packs were closing in from the north, adding to the hazards steaming it is dangerous for the ship and we See New Prodding For Berlin Talks Foreign Relations Chairman Calls for High Level Conference Eisen- can do no more." The Campbell radioed later, miles from the scene: "No further contact with Hans Hedtoft. Trawler Johan- nes Kruess still searching. for other ships'Conditions poor duc to wealh- north from the cr and darkness. No evidence north Atlantic shipping lanes iof (Danish) motor vessel to join the search. sighted. Trawler reported ice Cabinet Session closing in from northwest, In the van were the U. S I however continuing search, coast guard cutter Campbell (Navy aircraft arrived at and the German fishing vcs-1 and searching area." sel Poseidon. i Several other vessels were! en route but with little hope of reaching the scene before darkness closed in again. The Greenland navy com- mand advised the U. S. coast guard the Hans Hedtoft car- ried life rafts equipped with radios that sent out a contin- uous beacon signal. But none of the ships in the area re- ported hearing such signals. There was only silence aft- er the Danish government) owned ship sent out its last1 signal late yesterday. hower administration appar- ently is in line for some sharp prodding from the senate to move toward high level nego- tiations with Russia on the Berlin impasse. This was clearly indicated as Sen. J. William Fulbnght a persistent critic of administration foreign poli- cies, prepared to take over as chairman of the important senate foreign relations com- mittee. Calling for east-west talks on the German problem, Ful- bright said he thinks it would> Farmers Face Income Drop Changes in Way of Figuring Supports Will Bring Cut be "quite proper to enter into! a discussion of the withdrawal! sia withrew its occupation troops from East Germany, Hungary and Romania. "I am not particularly op- timistic about Russia's mak- ing any agreements in this field. But it is time we made! the Soviets take the respon- sibility for failing to agree in- stead of just saying 'no' every- time they propose some- thing." Cabinet Group Named to Help Cut Inflation In Copenhagen, King Fred- Washington Farm in- come may be cut hundreds of millions of dollars over tho erik IX summoned Prcmierincxt few years by new chang- H. C. Hanscn to report on theics in figuring agricultural progress of the search. Then Hansen called his cabinet in- to extraordinary session. It was .snowing heavily of troops from Berlin." Not Optimistic Washington Presi- dent Eisenhower today nam- a cabinet committee head- The 53-year-old Arkansas ed by Vice presidont Nixon' senator, who will succecdito hclp comDat inflation by next week to the chairman-ia continuing study' of ways ship vacated yesterday by to maintain price stability in Sen. Theodore Francis Green) an expanding economy. made it clear he A White House senators, James Brennan and But Fulbnghl said he thinks cabinet group to said serve the as a announce- committee continuing study the Casmir Kcndziorski. He said the Eisenhower admimslna-1 problem of how to maintain Assemblymen Fred Risscr, >tion has been remiss in not1 reasonable price stability as Circled cross locates area where the Danish ship Hans Hedtoft with 130 persons aboard struck an icebreak of Greenland Friday. It is about miles from where the Titanic hit an ire- defense spending appeared D-Madison, and Reino Pcra-, coming up with some proposal an essential basis for d R fc jd_ 'la, D-Superior, will introduce1 to counter the Soviet's demand'ing a high and sustainable likely today after senate tes- timony that more money is needed to match Soviet space and missile advances. sembly. Downed U. S. Aircraft, Two days of a wide ranging Crew Reported Safe senate inquiry into the status preme revolutionary tribunal. vs preparedness touched The tribunal rejected More-1 ff speculation that of.jon's appeal from a lower! Democrats may try t a [court death sentence onj and president Eisenhower' of budget. The U.S. air made "free city Contending the administra- tion apparently has stalled on dead center in dealing with Russia's Berlin demand, Ful- of economic growth." Red Cross Chief Asks Release for Airman Stuttgart. Germany en voyare in 1912. bright told a news conference1 The European director of the'assistance." when the Hedtoft hit well, the iceberg shortly before noon yesterday. Four hours later she radioed: "Slowly sinking and need immediate price supports. Secretary of Agricultura Benson announced the chang- es in a surprise administra- tive action late yesterday. President Eisenhower had told congress in a special farm message Thursday that price supports were too cost- ly and were encouraging pro- duction of farm surpluses. Cotton Producers The change was expected to have repercussions in the Democratic controlled con- gress and in some farmer groups. Cotton producers were the first affected. Their income from the 1959 crop faced a potential cut of almost million. Other products which are likely to feel the impact tins year include tobacco, pea- nuts, rice and dairy prod- ucts. The development may well influence this year's returns j from such other crops as soybeans, cottonseed, flax- Iseed and dry beans. In 1960 and following years, it could affect income not on- from all these crops but i from wheat, corn, oats, bar- jley and sorghum grains as Enters Hospital Tokyo force said today a downed yesterday: [American" Red Cross today Snow Hurries persisted 10-, Washington John L. senate SA16 amphibious aircraft with' Personally, I think it is im- asked East German Red day and sens remained high, 78 president of the to ex-'flve crewmen was safe in the portant to move toward the Cross leaders for a conference, the U S coast guard reported United Mine Workers of island harbor 200'withdrawal of foreign troops, to discuss the release of U S miles south of Tokyo. lit would be a good thing if Rus-army pilot Richard Mackin hom.cide, robbery, sad hearisrn and damage. inrcndi- Eisenhower is recommend-! disobeyed an order of no pic- A Havana radio station said J" J, ture taking of victims. lit understood Morejon would 'or f'sc James Clark, deputy coron- face a firing squad today but: er, said Lasker made a photo- graph of the victims after he this could not confirmed. McElroy contend this' is adequate to cope with any1 was allowed to enter the build-' The only recourse left threat. Ing with the understanding of! Morejon under the revolution- no pictures of the bodies. ary penal code is a direct ap-, peal to revolutionary leader Former Commander of Iraqi Armed Forces Sentenced to Death The weekly pa- per Akhbar Elyom said today former Iraqi army command- er-in-chief Abdel Salam Aref armed forces. Thor Cape Canaveral, Fla. Two Men Spend Eight Days Adrift In Atlantic; Rescued by Carrier Maypert, eight days Fla. George Harring-JYork City Jan. 9 in Harring-'eight days was sit and think ton and Harley Crowell sat in ton's 47-foot sloop Atair. fish." Harrington said, a 10-foot rubber dinghy, think-! "I wanted to go down to "We didn't catch any fish Th ing and fishing. They didn't Puerto Rico and the Virgin though. A man can do a lot ie" Will It Morejon's execution would The Air force has lighted any fish. They only islands to look them over wondering when he's Thc trawler comb- frnen IF ________ ____ Workers But winds began falling off, a Arrlcrlra is in Georgetown hopeful factor university hospital here for Visibility varied widely, observation, ranging up to 8 or 9 miles, then entered the hospital lowering to a mile in the rise lasl night. Dr. John Minor and fall of the storm, the the mine workers chief guard said. 'had had a little trouble Found Nothing ,past few days and there was Thc 650-ton Kruess reached; sornc question as to whether the area only about an hour jt had been a heart attack, after the Hans Hedtoft sent its Lewis suffered n minor last SOS. I heart attack in 1955. But the wind was 60 miles hour, icy waves were 20 feet Ihigh and f OR cut visibility. Down, Down, Down be the first in the area. An unofficial total of 282 supporters of ousted Dic- tator Fulgencio Batista have been shot elsewhere in the country. with a blinking Thor mis- sile fired on the start of an- other mile flight test. Last night's shoot was the said Aref was convicted of at- tempting to assassinate Iraqi Staying in Flew xovlt A former J5th launching of the work- horse Thor since the IRBM flight program began years ago in a floated helpless in the open cause my wife Gma and like that. The main Atlantic. have been planning to settle'thing I thought about was "We are thankful to bejin that Harrington ex-jwhether we'd be found soon the two said last night! plained. "She was going to i enough in an interview aboard the fly down to San Juan and Netherlands aircraft carrierimeet us." Expect Quick Renewal Of Rockets Committee SUII Undaunted Undaunted by the expert- Washtagtaa The sen- Doorman. The Dutch It was a fairly good tripience, Harrington said after heute's rackets committee goes ship, en route here for ma-until they hit rough wcatherjis rested he plans to headjout of business at midnight The ej-foot rocket was shot newreri with the U.S. Jan 19 about miles back for Puerto Rico and the on another fall range tcstlfomd the shipwrecked of Bermuda. In winds aimed at improving reliability east of Bermuda. Premier Abdel Karmi Kassem jwtfe face arraignment-today and stage a coup d'etat. ion charges they killed the as- Aref reportedly told tbe'slstant manager of Blrdland, court Kassem knew nothing'Broadway Jatx mecca convict and his red-haired U, boosting the chanc- es af bitting the target time. CM During the to 68 miles an hour, the sloop began to leak and sink. Virgin islands "and I may start out by boat .again, too. eight days "We had a .radio on Crcwctl said it was his first tonight, but a quick revival is expected early next week. Chairman John L. McClel- lan (D-Ark) said he would ask senate Democratic Lead- grape Juice "We bad each day about the revolution of last; Lee SeNesinger, m, and aatlau't July until aner the royal fam- Terry. ware booked. "7. -.___ mtLJlMM___ fly in true, was MUedl anufoa. aawitCTue dMraua la uie'tawiei uuw WUK R uua wen.last m about a Baghdad was under his con- knife-slaying of Irving with IfATO defense rington said. troi. in Birdland iast Monday, 'farces to Eagland. I They tram r adrift, Harrington and Crow- sloop but it was out of order "and I hope my last" Lyndon B. Johnson to rail The Douglas Thar, at- ell lived off a cm of tuna when we needed Harriot-! rtence of being in trouble i up a renewal resolution on M one af the key vehicles ui fish and a small bottle of ton said. jafloat. {Monday. He and Crowell gathered As men as they can come rations to a few possessions and when a fog Itfls Har- and scampered foot rubber dinghy Kewi "All we bad ta McOellan indicated yester- day he expected no difficulty Hito the far the carrier to oockjin euHUnuang committee work and recemmg current bearings! to fly la their homes, 'until Taeoaay. do for Uwialaa fair and very cold today, tonight and Sunday. High today 9 below to 5 above north 5 to 10 above south. Low tonight 10 to 20 below north sero to 10 below south. Temperatures during the 24-hour period ending at n m. today: High. 29; low, 12 below zero. Temperature at a.m. today. 7 below zero.' Wind out of the west at 10 miles an hour. Barometer at 30.90 inches. Sun sets at p.m; rises Sunday at a.m.; moon Sunday at Promi- nent stars are Hefuiua the Twins. SPAPFRf   

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