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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: January 23, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - January 23, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST-CRESCENT VOL.XUXNo.70 26 A, B AFTIETOMNEENAH-MENASHA, WIS., FtlDAY, JANUARY WHtB SEKVICC Price Seven Cents 16 Below Here as Cold Hits East Half of U.S. Flood Traps 12 in Mine; 33 Escape At Least 88 Deaths Due To Storms BY FRED B. WALTERS A cold wave knifed across! Pittston, Pa., Crews tried today to stop the rain- the eastern half of the nation swollen Susquehanna river from pouring its freezing waters, today sending temperatures into a nearby anthracite mine where miners were either in Appleton to 16 degrees be- trapped or drowned. coldest reading Thirty-three other miners escaped a watery tomb when the.g rushing river suddenly ate a hole into the Knox Coal com- Jan. 17, 1954, when it was 18 pany tunnel at nearby Port Griffith just before noon yester- below. Forecasters see some mod-' New and Used Cars in a lot in Baldwinsville, N. Y., near Syracuse, were awash in the wake of a mid-winter flood Thursday. Four new cars in an adjacent garage did not escape the high water. A total of 17 cars, valued at more than were nearly under water. t Defendant in Cuban Trial Condemned to be Executed Small Crowd Remaining in Room Cheers Guilty Verdict (Picture on Page 2) 14 to Testify On Housing Democratic Leaders Propose to Pass Their Own Program Washington Senate Democratic leaders called 14lers found Maj- Jesus Sosa men to Cuba by Cas- defendant in Havana's first showcase war crimes trial was convict- ed just before dawn today and sentenced to die before a firing squad. A 3-man tribunal of Fidel Castro's revolutionary offic- hours and more than four hours of deliberation by the three judges. Almost all the crowd ol shouting, jeering Cu- bans who had jammed Hav- ana's Sports palace for the Community Fund, Council Merge to Create DCS, Inc. Adoption of Resolution Was Delayed by 2-Man Argument The Appleton eration in the extreme cold for one miner Wisconsin tonight but temper-, 11 will i ZGPO rnsrk Floods" Ease ,11 g a t VULCU (such as the Red The mercury was slow to lnto a new orSamzatlon'Cross) as well as local Twenty-six others wandered through the maze of tunnels in waistdeep water for seven hours before a rescue team found and brought them to safety up the air shaft. A little diesel engine kept pushing coal cars into the whirlpool of water and ice chunks that marks the seem- ingly bottomless hole in the river bank. Must Clear Mine The cars, and the tons of Seek Woman As Kidnaper shake itself free of the sub- to be known as United Corn- day. we never heard the water come in at all, Wisconsin tonignt out temper-, -me Appicion organization for Appleton that said. was just there." still will remain below Fund and Community Council'wiu be Q nalional Seven men, some aided by a map of the complicated miles the zero mark. .Thursday nicht voted to M. I of ancient coal tunnels, got out by climbing an air shaft sev- eral hundred yards upstream from the hole. zero plunge. The Wisconsin munity Services of Appleton, Michigan Power company re- lnc _ bul nol without ported a frigid 11 below at this morning. opposition from leaders of Baldwin Elsewhere across the na- local March of Dimes, tion storms abated and floods in some areas appeared eas- ing. But the punishing blows formerly called the National from the violent mid-winter erv's Ambrosia room, means Foundation for Infantile Pa- Infant Taken From Apartment in West Side New York New York Police to- welfare and recreational ag- encies. The opposition was led by and John Bar- low, leaders of the March of The action, taken at a meet- Dimes, which is run national- in the Elm Tree National Foundation Ambrosia room, means snow, sleet and ram creation of an overall fund- ralysis The foundation has and floods left many sections raising and welfare planning led tne Opposjtj0n nationally staggering. Conditions were in the dis-. aster stage in some of flood-stricken regions. At least 88 persons the. I werci bailed hay also used to plugjday had one concrete dead from floods and effects the breach, vanished in the swirling waters. The tracks of the Lehigh Valley railroad parallel the river, and a cliff rises almost vertically behind the tracks. Worried relatives and witnesses today to counter the Eisenhower administration's Blanco, 51-year-old career) tro to see his war crimes appeals for enactment of its robbery, own housing program. age. five counts of murder, homicide, looting and dam- start of the trial had gone, townspeople watched quietly home hours before. So hadjfrom the edge of the cliff as most of the 380 foreign news-, the crews worked hour after hour to stop the flow of water. Until it is, said Mine Supt. Robert Groves, rescue crews won't be able to begin pump- ing out the mine. The mine, 14 states from New Mexico to the east- woman's the of tne storms in from New kidnaping of an ailing, 23-day- ern seaboard. old child from a west side Damage to property was ioj apartment yesterady. It the millions of dollars. No es- the city's second baby abduc- timate could be made of the tion this year. miscry and A specimen of the kidnap- Ohio, jer's handwriting was obtained i York, Kentucky and Indiana. The witnesses included spokesmen for the national housing conference, the AFL- C1O, Americans for Demo- cratic Action, American In- stitute of Architects, and oth- ers who have called for big- ger programs than President Eisenhower has asked. Sen. John Sparkman CD- presiding over senate hearings on the hotly disputed program, predicted that a 1- package housing bill far broader and more costly than Eisenhower wants will be passed by congress before the end of February. Seek Quick Action The Democrats, with com- manding majorities in both senate and house, are driving for swift passage of a com- prehensive housing program in a single bill. It would con- tain money and authority the president describes as urgent- ly needed to keep hous- ing activities alive, plus many other items he believes should be cut or otherwise amended drastically. Eisenhower has demanded a hold-down on federal spend- ing to achieve a balanced budget. President Creates Price-Cost Agency Washington In an anti-inflation move, President Eisenhower today created a government committee to study all federal activities af- fecting prices and costs. "We need to make sure thati we are not contributing to the The verdict was returned after a trial of almost eight Accused of Chaining Tot To Bedpost trials in action. The verdict brought a cheer from the small crowd of Cu- bans remaining. Sosa Blanco looked bewildered and shift- ed his feet uneasily but said nothing as the verdict was read. Prepares Appeal A group of people had gath- ered the gate to the Sports palace as he was led out by a Turn to Page 9, Col. 7 Democratic Leaders Trying to Smash Tammany's Power New York in the form of a note written! phone number. Police assum- ed the name was fictitious af- ter finding that the address (174 Southern Boulevard, the _, Bronx) was a fake. The phone to turned out to be an Uo United Fund drives which I attempt to raise money for 'anti-disease work and for lo- cal agencies in one big annual drive. Baldwin protested that a UCS "would open the door to a national movement which is called thc National United is as insidious as the communist movement." lie added that this group has publicly taken an outright stand against individual health agencies not affiliated with United Funds. Fears Coercion r-nnsnlatinn in "Y   _ other housing items, medical March of Dlnnes .ls Prohibited, care and other consumerI by charter, to join any organ- costs {ization such as UCS.) Thc bureau of labor statis-1 Baldwin expressed fears tics price index declined to'that the United Community 1237 per cent of the 1947-49 Services would either coerce average, the base. 'other agencies to jmn in the In reporting this today, the UCS program, or would cur- bureau noted the index stood tail their activities. A letter DC- written by Baldwin appeared Toledo, Ohio Police said the mother of 7-year- old Judith Ball today admit- ted chaining her to a bed- j post over the last two years, releasing her only to go to the bathroom and to school. As soon as the girl got home from school, said De- tective Sgt. James McCor- mick, on went a 7-pound, 4- foot-long chain. McCormick said Judith told him she slept on the floor in her underclothing. She said that was more comfortable than the bed, which had pnly a thin blan- ket over coil springs, he added. Father Unemployed McCormick quoted the mother, 39-year-old Ruth Ball, as saying she chained the girl because of her hab- its of getting up at night, raiding the refrigerator for food and otherwise causing trouble. The father, Paul Ball, 40, is an unemployed laborer. The Balls have two other girls, 8 and 9, and six boys, 14 to 22, all living at home. The three girls were placed in the Miami Chil- dren's home here, pending was put aboard an open army a roots" truck. They pelted the truck movement aimed largely at with oranges and other fruit I as it sped away. Sosa Blanco's defense coun- sel, Capt. Aristides Dacosta, already had said that a con- viction would be appealed to a 5-man superior court provid- Tammany Hall Leader mine G. DeSapio. Turn to Page 9, Col. 4 Pay Increases Advocated for State Employes Madison bureau of The state personnel recom smashing the party power Check Records In view of reports that the They say they want to des- tory "the image of bossism" and "return the party to the voters." Leaders of the movement are Herbert H. Lehman, for- mer U. S. Senator and gover- nor; Thomas K. Finletler, for- in the Post-Crescent Thurs- index was day. In it, he elaborated on exactly the-same as that of the disadvantages involved in is an expectant', Volunteer firemen rode a last September and last with thc National Car- mother, the handwritten notCjpennsylvania railroad freight Some 700000 workers United Fund. was to be used in a canvas of. yesterday as close to the farm whose pay rates are geared to1 The letter, he said, was rescued a mother and her son comber, 1957. from the floodwaters of the, The December Allegheny river. hospital records and Mrs. Berth Lemon, 55, and quarterly and semi-annual misinterpreted. "I come here her son Roland, 18, as they adjustments of the index con- tonight to protest against any sequently will receive no affiliation with the national offices. Police and the FBI teamed j could gel. up in an all-night search About half a mile away they change in pay. the area around eighty off and putt-putted the street, from where little John Tavarez disappeared with a woman his mother had met just two days ago. The grief stricken fatherj rest of the way. Food friers Rising but Baldwin said he was wholly in favor of These workers include lne nl0rger if an amendment 000 in electrical manufactur- Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 mer secretary of the air force; and Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. broadcast a radio and TV ap- Lehman, speaking for thei peal for the baby's return. three at a news conference] Authorities described the yesterday, announced forma-l woman being sought as 5 feet n Alvin A. Cheslock, of a New York Commit-, 2, weighing about 160 pounds, 2 A _ _ r _ _ ____ _ ___ -w r _ i _ J __ li i rr i 1 h 31, Turn to Page 9, Col. 4 Dormitory Burns In Mississippi State College, Miss.- nation's inflationary problems1 by the way in which we runj a child welfare board inves- our own government busi-1 tigation. The six boys were Eisenhower said. permitted to remain in their The president said in his home, budget message to congress! earlier this week that he plan- Boy's Experiment ned to set up such a study group. Him Housing Pattern In Fox Cities Showing A special article on an South Orange, N. I. Teddy Stillwell has added to his list of things he won't mended today that Wiscon- sin's civil service em- ployes be given salary in- creases m the 1959-61 bienni- uni ranging from to a month. The proposal, submitted to the board of personnel, alsoi called for two weeks vaca- tion after one year, three aft- er five and four after 20. The increases would be in addition to annual merit in- creases. Total cost of the hiked sal- aries would be about 000 a year. In the past the board has generally gone along with recommendations from its technical staff. The board planned to meet later in the day to act on the recommendation. After the board makes its decision it will report to the joint finance committee of the legislature. The committee can approve, change or reject a recom- tee for Democratic Voters. He said it will seek to revital- ize the party through grass roots participation. having brown hair with btondc streaks, and "obviously prcg-, 19- nant." Nelson to unusual development in the housing field in the Fox i Cities appears on today's building pages. Brought to light by large number of apartments listed in thc Post-Crescent's want ads, the development shows a definite shift hous- ing patterns of FOR Cities Carretit classified an tke P-C carry many as 19 apartment of- fers, while a few years ago it WIN WHWaWMM to fiMi IflOW? than team half-amen. Thto sMcta! arttete ap- >Uwi today with MUM ea A 11 :mendation. touch with a 10-foot pole. They arc high tension wires i p0rc< 'and a loaded tank car of kero-j scne. i Cancel Engagements 12-year-old boy did; ny. thc execut1Ve residence to- wa, trying to ram 10-foot long metal pole intojlhree i scheduled for the day. The governor was to have spoken car gallons of kefoaene. In. jn Milwaukee before the! doing M the pole hit a ,choou boards association Tott overhead power line. the Wltconsin Safety Con- Teddy was hurled to and he and Rep. Ger- ffrovnd. and power went off inuM T. flynn, D-Racine, were area temporarily. have been guests at a tes- somehow there wat no explo-'tfmonial dinner at Burlington slon. tonight. The hoy was in food Condi-: governor's physician of the recommended a rf st period of at least twa I ing. mainly employes of Gen- eral Electric and Sylvama; in Douglas and some other aircraft firms, and over1 1 in major trucking con- !corns II.' E. Rilcy, chief of the la- bor department's living cost de- division, said he anticipated winng raced lhrougn no material change in the main men.s dormitory at ing cost level from December 'MlssLsMppi Slalc univcrMty to January. However, he said today ,cavjng nolhmg preliminary reports indicate hut a mass of of lhc .food prices arc higher this 78_ycar.old bnck and wood rnonlh- frame structure. In Dnccmbcr food declined About ji000 studcnls livpd I six-tenths of 1 per cent- -n lhc 4..sccllon building. Of- marking the fifth straight sakl lhcy bclicvcd an monthly decline in food prices escapcd_ Tnc names broke Fresh fruits, particularly or- QUl aboul 2.45 a m and many angcs: eggs, poultry and cof- of thc studenUs werc up studying for final lions. One student burns on tho hand- examina- rcccived fee, all were lower. Fresh vegetables rose over 5 per cent seasonally. Thc price of coffee has been supervisor declining for 11 MraiRht of studcnt housms. sa.d it months and is 12 2 bc impossihlc lo lcU lower than m January. 958. whclher all got out unul an Rents were slightly higher impronlplu roll caU later. in all areas of the country ex- Damage estimates were un- cept in Detroit where they are but G said lt reported to be running lower woujd cost millfon to re. than a year ago Rilcy'said h dormitory. this probably reflects the ci- v___________ ty's over-all economic situa- tion. New 1959 model car prices declined a bit in December a.s dealers began giving larger discounts. Prices of used cars continued a general advance Higher railroad fares in the east and some increases in lo- cal transit fares helped push up over-all transportation costs. Tram clttpc hands in an altitude of prayer at a New York police station after she and her husband reported their 23-day-old son, John, was missing from their home. Mrs. Tavarei had left the child with woman she had befriended thc day before and when she returned from apartment-hunting trip both tin womaa and cMM Freight Train Catches Fire in Louisiana La. A north- bound Missouri Pacific freight train caught fire shortly be- fore midnight, with 32 cars de- railed and several others ex- ploded or burned. The train, carrying a cargo of rubber and chemicals, caught fire whrn a Journal box hi one of the axles of one car overheated and ignited. The car plunged from tracks, 11 ethers with H. No Today; Typewriter's frozen Wisconsin Fair and not quite so cold tonight. Sat- urday partly cloudy east with a band of light snow approaching west portions late Saturday. Low temper- atures tonight will range from 15 below northwest to 8 below southeast Outlook for Sunday: Mostly cloudy with light snow and some- what warmer. Fox tem- peratures for the 24-hour period ending at 9 o'clock: High 7, tow 16 below tero. Temperature at 11 o'clock. 11 below sero. West wind at 14 miles per hour. Baro- meter 90.3W inches. Weather map on page B-7 Sun sets at p.m.. Uses Saturday at a.m.; 1 moon riaes at arm. INEWSPAPERif NEWSPAPER!   

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