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Appleton Post Crescent: Thursday, January 22, 1959 - Page 1

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   Appleton Post-Crescent (Newspaper) - January 22, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                               APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL XUX No. 69 48 A, B, C, D WIS., THUtSDAY, JANUAtY WBK UJtVICB Price Seven Cents AFL-CIOMaps New Drive for Pay Increases Leaders Reject President's Plea To Curb Boosts AFL-CIO leaders, spurning President Eisenhower's renewed plea to curb wage increases, meet today to chart a new drive for pay boosts. Al G. Hayes, president of the machinists union, said in advance of a meeting of the AFL CIO economic policy committee he does not agree with the president's wage- price policies. Saying prices and overly high profits are to blame for inflation, Hayes added that "I don't agree with the im- plication that decent wage rates are responsible. "It is misleading to the American people." Hayes is a member of the AFL-CIO policy group head- ed by auto union chief Wai- Nelson Proposes Constitution Change to Permit State Debt 49 Dead, Loss In Millions as Storms Lash U. S. 6 Inches of Snow Dumped on Fox Cities; Mercury Hits -6 Mother Nature turned her big guns loose' Wednesday, dropping snow, rain, cold, wind, flood and tornado block- busters on many parts of the nation. ter Reuther. Its position has] As Fox Cities residents dug been that wages are too from the season's heav- in relation to costs and prof- its. President's Appeal Sec. of Labor James P. Mit- chell scheduled a midday press conference. He was ex- pected to be queried about labor's criticism of Eisenhow- er's views. The president's annual eco- nomic message to congress Tuesday said most indicators are pointing upward but re- newed inflation could retard recovery prospects. Eisenhower urged business to keep down prices and la- bor to confine wage increases to improved output. Similar Eisenh9wer pleas for moderation have fallen on deaf ears in the past. Both consumer prices and wages are now at record highs by the government's measure- ments. Labor already is hitting for hefty new pay boosts in 1959. Sizeable new coal wage in- creases went into effect this month. Oil workers are in the process of negotiating a 5 per cent raise, their first increase in two years. Phone workers have posed a strike threat next week in six midwestern states. After that come labor ne- gotiations in a batch of key industries, including steel, chemical, rubber, aluminum. 6 Men Die in Plane Smashup Refueling Plane Explodes as It Lands in Louisiana Alexandria, La. A 4- engine air force refueling plane crashed and burned early today shortly after take- off on a routine training mis- sion. England Air Force base confirmed all six crew mem- bers died in the flaming crash. The plane, a converted B50 bomber, took off with six oth- ers on an early morning re- fueling mission with fighter planes. The England tower said the pilot radioed just aft- er he took off that the plane was in trouble and he was returning to the field. All Badly Burned The plane exploded as it landed, careened across the .field before the fuselage came electrical manufacturing rest on a Texas and Pa- railroads involving more thanicjfic railroad track. lest snowfall 6 some of the coldest 6 degrees below zero they could be thankful they escap- ed what hit Mount Vernon, Ohio, or Forksville, Pa., or Grayson county, Ky., or up- state New York. Those are just four of the spots across the nation belted by winter's most destructive elements. Deaths caused by the violent weather and floods Rescue Party Leaves Its Own Car on Lake Ice Two Appleton teenagers, John Mittlestadt, 18, 1528 W. Spring street, and Lois Den- nick, 17, 303 W. Prospect av- enue, had to walk several miles to shore after their car got caught in an ice fault on Lake Winnebago Wednesday. They had gone out on the ice about 3 p. m. Wednesday to recover a second car, which had been stalled on the ice Tuesday. The crack in the ice was covered by sno'w drifts from Wednesday's storm. Their car became caught in the fault. Unable to free the car, they walked to shore from a spot off Kimberly point. They were given coffee at the Neenah po- lice station about 9 p. m. Neenah police Capt. Henry Kohfeldt and Patrolman Lee Parrott had been getting ready, to go out onto the lake to find them after receiving a distress call from two other teenagers, Sue Haase, 1911 N. Morrison strejet, and Gene Wichman, 1817 S. Jefferson street, about the pair. mounted, with the latest Asso- ciated Press count at 49. three million workers. About three million workers are due to get auto- matic wage raises averaging about eight cents an hour un- der previously negotiated con- tracts. Favors Tighter Red Trade Curbs Washington Sec. of Commerce Strauss is reported in favor of tighter United States controls on trade with the Soviet bloc. Officials said Strauss has started a quiet review of the policy of cautious easing of east-west trade restrictions. The policy was instituted be- fore Strauss took over the cab- inet post from Sinclair Weeks three months ago. The department twice re- jected last month an export li- cense for a shipment of steel pipeline pipe to Russia. The 13-ton shipment was valued at million. Anastas I. Mikoyan, Rus- sia's deputy premier, is under- stood to have complained about the license rejection during his recent talks here. six crew of- England authorities said all Scores w.ere injured, and property damage is running into millions of dollars. Thou- sands are homeless in floods in Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsyl- vania, Indiana and New York. Back Up to Zero The Fox Cities had a high ficers .and three enlisted men Were badly burned and iden- tification would be difficult. The victims' names will not be released until relatives are contacted. The England control tower said the plane failed to gain altitude as it took off and the pilot came through with his emergency radio mes- sage. The plane cut a 200-yard swath before it finally came to rest on the tracks, about a half-mile from a cluster of residences. England Democratic Plan tor State In Today's Paper Complete coverage of today's important meeting of the Wisconsin legisla- ture appears on Pages 1 and 2 of today's newspa- per. The Post writer, John W. Wyn- gaard, obtained a copy ot the text of Gov. Nelson's message which he ab- stracted to give-Post-Cres- cent readers the story on what the Democratic ad- ministration tar their tuvmumaA. A cwnmtttcc Tn fUwr off 4M X AVV authorities said the plane earned a full load of jet fuel, but declined to say how many gallons were aboard. of 18 degrees about noon Wed- nesday, but the cold came with the snow and dropped to a low of 6 degrees below zero about 7 a. m. today. Six inch- es of new snow fell. It was deeper than that in spots, as all shovelers know, whipped into drifts by northwest winds that reached 21 miles an hour. The temperature climbed back to about zero by 10 o'clock this morning. Pros- Turn to Page B-8, Col. 1 Wednesday's Snow Was Particularly welcomed by the younger only is it good for sledding and skiing, it helps swell the pocketbooks of the more am- bitious. Here Tom Flood, 504 W. Glendale avenue, puts his shoulders to the shovel at 2007 N. Harriman street. Favors Economic Resources Agency BY JOHN WYNGAARD Staff Writer the state legislature for the first time since his election, Gov. Gaylord Nelson today said the state administration faces a challenge "unparalleled in both its urgency and Its complexity." He recommended legislative program which would amend the constitution to permit the state to do into debt to prepare port cities for the St. Lawrence seaway opening, and provide more outdoor recreation facilities. The new governor said his program is designed lo meet problems resembling those of most other states quite suddenly compelled to face up to an accumulation of major problems arising from the accelerated of the twentieth century." Most of the governor's offerings had been suggest- ed before, in campaign JI speeches, in the proposals of his Democratic party plat- form, and in speeches and press statements since his election Resources Proposal The most novel of his pro- posals was for the creation Cubans Support Execution Policy at Big Castro Rally Newsmen to Attend First Open Trial of Batista Men BT ROBEET BERRELLEZ Havana With the shouted support of more than half a million Cubans, Fidel Castro continues today his campaign to justify to the world the execution of Batista henchmen. The author of Fulgencio Batista's downfall appears be- fore hundreds of foreign news- men at a press conference. Later today, Havana opens its first showcase trail of Ba- tistans charged with murder and atrocities. The capital's first defendants were three of- ficers in the dictator's army A 14. M Mewl Blast Destroys House but Family Of 4 Escapes Milwaukee A three bedroom house on Milwau- kee's northwest side was blown apart today, but its family of four occupants es- caped both the blast and a subsequent fire. Firemen said a natural gas leak caused the explosion. A sim- ilar incident occurred at an- other south side home five days ago. Lester Hackbarth, who purchased the new home last fall, said he and his wife, Gloria, 26, were in the kitchen and their two small sons Allen, 4, and Wade, 4 months were in the living room when "all of a sudden, the house blew up." Hackbarth, who is 30, and his wife grabbed the chil- dren and fled out a rear door in zero temperatures. and the scene the seat sports palace Which Batista built. Nearly witnesses wearing the colorful clothes of their rural areas were in town for the trials. American newsmen wanted British See China Purge Young Ethusiasts For Commune May Be Given New Jobs London Some British of a Wisconsin economic re- sources commission, with funds for a staff of special- ists in industry, agriculture, conservation and other fields] to dedicate the energies of the state to expand the state's economy. He said the state's best hope for raising the money that new public service de- mands require will be to ex- pand the tax base through broadening the economic wealth of the state. The governor did not make specific proposals on the changes he wants in the state tax system, in governmental organization, in the slate bor- rowing program, or for an ac- celerated highway construc- tion program. He will discuss those subjects later, in sepa- rate messages, with concrete legislation offered, he said. Gov. Nelson delivered his Turn t oPagc 4, Col. 2 to ask Castro at the news con-'experts on the Far East say _ ference about his statement'they think a purge of im- to the giant throng yesterday that "Cuba will ask a revision purge patient young men from red informants say the cleaning is likely to and nullification of new communes is concessions given foreign "P shortly, terprises by the government! Tne of Batista." house Castro singled out only thejshlft over-enthusiastic young Cuban Telephone Co part oflfunclionarics adminis- the estimated billion dollar! Jobs to manual chores. American investment in Cuba.I The object would be re-edu- The International Telephone i cation of younger party of fi- Telegraph corporation affil- iate got permission from Ba- tista to raise rates two years ago to justify expansion in- vestments. "Telephone rates be front of the c i a 1 s who have ruthlessly pushed development of the communes vast labor batal- lions run on military lines- Major Points In Message Wants to Help Port Cities Improve Harbors Rortm Madison Here are the most important of the speci- fic proposals for legislation of Gov. Gaylord Nelson, as outlined in his first formal executive message to the legislature in joint session today: 1. Creation of a Wisconsin Economical Resources com- mission, to coordinate many existing state services and to provide new ones, with major operating divisions for state planning, agricul- tural development, and in- dustrial development. 2. State aids and loans to Wisconsin port cities for the improvement of their har- bors, with repayments to the state out of harbor use charges, 3. State initiative for the creation of a national dairy products marketing coop- alive. 4. A change in the method of choosing consorv a t i o n commissioners, with new legislation for tighter water conservation, lake use, and recreational water access, and more rapid acquisition of wetlands for game. 5. Enactment of a Turn to Page 4, Col. 7 In Little Rock Remain Closed Little Rock, Ark. Most Little Rock high school students and their parents ap- parently arc resigned to fin- ishing this year without public I fCOfflS fVlGV fVlCIKO schools, despite recent fcder-' t t al court moves to reopen the LOnG Of facilities immediately. "It's too late to do any good i London A month of this said one mother. ra'n threatened today to turn without taking time to adapt "My Billy is settled at a pri- the historic Thames river val- them to Chinese family and vale school and he'll probably ley west of London into a vast peasant traditions. is t a y there because we lake. are going to Castro said. The rally in __ ._._ presidential palace attracted I what has come to be known as 'schools would stay open a large part of Havana's "cult of the defying they are reopened." These officials have set upjcouldn't be sure the public Five days of heavy down- residents, plus many more from outlying provinces Turn to Page 4, Col. 1 3 Sentenced for Holdups, Burglary traditional Chinese reverence if pours, culminating in an all- night downpour and gale Green Bay men drew long il- The speaker was represen- winds last night, brought the for age. tative of thousands of river to its highest level since British analysts, studying who first looked on school the great floods of 1949. Offi- reporls from China, feel the closing as a temporary meas- cials estimated the rise would young men have driven Chi- ure but who now are prepared continue at least two more na's peasants to water, but to extend emergency educa-- days. have been unable to make tional provisions indefinitely. Windsor town and its an- them drink. certainly through this school cient castle perched high on The observers say some- year. a chalk shelf, were almost an Throe thing has gone wrong with the Caught In a battle between island. concurrent sentences in municipal court Wednesday in connection with commune system and the federal and state governments London, 25 miles down the young firebrands are being on the school integration ques- Thames from Windsor, was blamed. A Dec. 18 report by lion, Little Rock students drenched and waterlogged 'the reformatory. Argentina's General Strike Reported Broken Aires Crashes hard core of the general strike fntO against President A r t u r Frondiici's austerity program! N. T. A run- collapsed last night. 400-foot grain frcight- Peronist leaders of 62 "mashed a steel-lift bridge tons voted in a secret meeting Buffalo river last to send their members Two men on bridge to work today. H was believed holdups of a motel and fillinglthe Chinese communist party this week finished first .semes- but there was no immediate station, a' burglary and committee flashed a ter work in schools in other threat of flood in the down- theft. Judge Donald W. light and announced de- communities. Another town area. son sentenced Robert of the communes are nearing mid-term at new-'--------------' 29, and Herman Wheeler, 28, would be at a much slowcnly organized private schools both of Long Beach, Calif., to pace in the coming year. 'here. four terms ranging up to years. Donald Vallicr, 20, of Green Bay was sentenced to a maximum of 10 years in Conway rhter Crashes 7 C A Bridoe holdouts, mostly industrial workers, would return to their (Color Picture on Page H) and manager of the hotel, rc- t -o ported Wednesday, has been Construction of the ,2-room arranged tnrougnythc Aid As. replacement-addition at the sociation for Lutherans injured jConway hotel will start in Conway unveiled building Damage to the bridge was! March or April. 'or the square- at S3 million. M. n. Hif.lCH'S end of the strike after! from its winter mooring up- pj.ns for the 6-story im- council represented another! "tretm and drifted Into Ihe.prorement will go to pros-, Tletory for policy 'central Jift portion of the, pectlve bidders Feb. m of refusing to coddle labor mt Dictator Jwm Kvcn thuvfli vnwccvsvful, 
                            

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