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Appleton Post Crescent: Monday, January 12, 1959 - Page 1

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   Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - January 12, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                             APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL. XLDC No. 60 36 A, B MONDAY, 1959 AMOCtATCD FWB WIU U3MVICE Senate Defeats Majority Rule to Curb Filibusters Rejects Plan Offered by Sen. Douglas Washington The sen- ate today voted down a pro- posal to let filibusters against civil tights bills and other measures be cut off by vote of bare majority of the sena- tors. The vote was 67 to 28. The defeated proposal was offered by Sen. Paul H. Doug- las (D-I11) in behalf of a coal- lition of northern and western senators fighting a formula sponsored by Democratic Leader Lyndon B. Johnson Douglas plan would have permitted a majority of the senate, or 50 of. the 98 members, to halt a filibuster after 15 days. Under present rules, it takes the votes of 66 senators, or two-thirds of the membership, to shut off de- bate and force an issue to a vote. Johnson's proposal, which has the support of other sen- ate leaders of both parties, would allow filibusters to be choked off by two-thirds of the senators present and voting. Another Proposal With the defeat of the Doug- las amendment, its supporters planned to throw their strength behind an amend- ment under which filibusters could be choked by three-fifths of the senators present and voting. They insisted that this amendment, proposed by Sen Thruston Morton (R-Ky) stood a real chance of adop- tion. However, senators back- the Johnson compromise were confident that it woulc prevail. During the debate Johnson told Douglas tartly he believ- ed confidence that the out- come of the fight over the rules "will be a fair reflection of the will of the senate and the will of the nation." Johnson said senators who want debate limitation- by majority vote, as well as those who are opposed to any change in the existing rule, can work their will if they can get a majority of their colleagues to go along with them. He is sponsoring, along with senate leaders of both parties, a compromise under which filibusters could be shut and issues forced to a vote by two thirds of the senators present and voting. Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (R- the senate minority lead- er, also appealed 'for approval of the compromise resolution. He described it as the reason- able course to follow. Johnson told reporters be- fore the start of the session he saw some hope for a final showdown vote on the whole issue before nightfall. j Congregation fliocks Pastor In Controversy Whitehall The Rev. Richard Buege was confirmed as pastor of St. Paul's Lu- theran church here Sunday. Members of the congregT- tion voted 90-17 to retain Pas- tor Buege. A committee of Wisconsin Lutheran Synod leaders ear- lier this month informed Pas- tor Buege that he could not remain a synod member un- less he conformed to the group's rules. The latest controversy con- cerning Pastor Buege involv- ed his extending the right to vote on church matters to women in the congregation, contrary to synod rules. The synod committee also had ob- jected to Pastor Buege's com- munion "fellowship" with Lu- theran clergymen of other synods. The term-connotes as- sociation in religious activi- ties. Mother of 8 Seized in Kidnaping; Baby Alive Pastor Buege said that the congregation is still a part of the Wisconsin Synod but could be dismissed by the church council. The meeting was attended by 118 of the 191 congregation members. Eleven abstained from voting and six couples withdrew from membership after the vote. Two synod "of- ficials met with dissident cou- ples outside the church. Pilots'Strike At American Brought to End Some Jet Fliers To Earn Under Contract Washington American Airlines planned to resume neth McCabe Suspect Denies Guilt But Chionchio Infant Identified Beyond Doubt New York A mother of eight children was booked to- day on a kidnap charge, a few hours after 10-day-old Lisa Chionchio was found unharmed and well in a Brooklyn apart- ment. The woman, identified as Mrs. Jeane lavaronc, 43, was booked at Brooklyn 82nd precinct police station on Butler street, after stubbornly proclaiming her innocence through- out the night. "There is no doubt, on the basis of scientific evidence, that she took the said Chief Assistant Dist. Atty. J. Ken- half its flights today under a new contract that could earn a year for some jet pl- ots. The contract, approved yes- Governor Proposes FourMajor Reforms Nelson Begins Reorganization, Would Consolidate Agencies ed all senators feared the Illinois senator's proposed rules change, although some were prepared to vote for it. In the final speech before the vote, Douglas called John- son's proposal "a meaning- less gesture" and said "it's effect will be to fool the Amer- ican people into thinking they are getting something when they all are getting nothing at Johnson interrupted to say he never had called it a com- promise. He pointed out that it had 40 sponsors. The senate met at 10 a.m., two hours early, in an effort to get the dispute out of-the way. In debate on the Douglas amendment Johnson express- in Europe Blocked by Heaviest Snowfall of Winter London The heaviest snowfalls of Europe's blocked highways, stranded travelers and marooned whole communities today. Snow lay over all Britain and almost lill of the conti- nent. Britain, whipped by blizz- ards in the north and floods fn lowlying East Anglia, seem- ed to have caught the worst of it. Abandoned cars, trucks and buses were scattered on roads up and down the coun- try. Near Braemore an expect- ant mother and four other oc- cupants of a stranded bus hiked to safety across 2J miles of snowdrifts sometimes six feet deep. Snowplows battled their way along the Perth-Braemore road to rescue 60 skiers trap- ped all night in a resort. Early morning snow cover ed London's streets, but was soon ground into slush by the wheels of vehicles. Across the channel, the rest of Europe shivered too. Belgium lay completely cov- ered with snow. The north of Italy froze. BY JOHN WYNGAARD MMIion BUI-HI Madison Gov. Gay lord Nelson summoned principal state department heads at. an early hour today to explain that he meant what he said during his campaign when he proposed extensive reforms in the management and organi- zation of key state services. The department heads arose about dawn and were assembled in the executive office at a.m. The new governor turned up, a scant week after his swearing in, to outline his plan for extensive state administrative reorgan- ization and management changes he described as in- tended to make state opera- tions more efficient and more responsive to elected offi- cials including the governor and the legislature. Four Reforms Nelson said flatly the exist- ng 79 agencies are too num- erous, ttmt budget making las been sloppy and that in spite of repeated boasts over .he years, the Wisconsin ad- ministration is not as effi- cient as those of some other second year budget requests De closely reviewed after In what he called a preli- tne legislature adjourns nex summer. Expenses Rise He noted that for the first time state departments during his term will spend substan tially more than a billion dol lars a year, and that recentl; state expenses have been ris ing at a rate of million minary report he demanded four major reforms, includ- ing: 1. The consolidation of half a dozen legislative services into a new department of leg islative services that would remain exclusively under the control of the legislature. 2. Consolidation of major business and finance services into a new department of ad- ministration and finance. 3. A self survey program oi maagement audits, under the direction of the governor's of- fice, to review continuously the efficiency and economy of state operation. 4. What he called a program type budget process "to per- mit a more intelligent plan ning and supervision of state spending." Nelson also warned again that he intends to put depart- ments on a 1-year spending plan, that the first year bud get of his term will be an economy budget because 01 the revenue problem, and tha -Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 8. Edmund Floor, 40, of E. Water street, Nee- nah. 9..Merlin L. Otto, 33, route 1, Neenah. (Story on Page A-14.) yearly. Nelson spoke quietly and in a conciliatory fashion as he described his purposes ant Turn to Page 4, Col. 1 He said the infant, snatched from St. Peter's hospital nurs- ery shortly after she was born Jan. 2, had apparently been kept in Mrs. lavarone's fur- nished flat in Brooklyn-ever erday, ended the last in a since. icries of national airline strikes. Since October, walkouts have disrupted flights by East- ern Air Lines, Trans World Airlines, Capital Airlines and American at various times. Among major domestic lines, only United Airlines was un- affected. After the 22-day American strike ended, the company im- mediately started partial ser- vice. A full schedule of flights was expected tomorrow. Boosts and Retroactive Pay The Air Line Pilots associa- ion, which called the strike against American, estimated Jie settlement would net its pilots a 15 per cent pay increase and a total of mil- lion in retroactive pay. The contract dates back to August, 1957. A union spokesman said the captain of a Boeing-707 jet, which American plans to atari using later this month, could earn a year. A Convair captain, the spokesman added could earn a year. The old contract" would have given him a year. American, before the strike began Dec. 19, had offered a pay increase of 10 per cent, the union spokesman said. The new contract also pro- vides a third pilot for jet crews. Current piston plane crews comprise two pilots and one flight engineer. The strike cost an estimated loss of million to the com- pany, its suppliers and their employes. Kills Wife and 2 of 4 Children Maitland, Fla. (fi A 40- year-old man hacked to death "So far as we know she nev- er left the house with the McCabe said. woman quit her S45-a- AP Mrs. lavarone week job as a credit depart- ment clerk in a Brooklyn de- partment store on the day the baby disappeared, police said. Officials said the woman claims she gave birth to the child herself that night alone in her second floor apart- ment at 90 St. Mark's avenue. "She insists the baby is McCabe said. Identical Footprints However, he added, foot- prints of the kidnaped girl, Executions in Cuba Increase 50 Batista Backers Killed; Nearly Face Trials Havana Executions of the followers of former tator Fugencio Batista are mounting in Cuba as the forc- es of rebel leader Fidel Cas- tro continue hurryup military trials. Thus far about 50 Batista supporters have been execu- ted. Nearly are awaiting trial. Asked on a U.S. television program yesterday why the! Batista followers were being executed without open Castro said: "There were not! so many Two or three doz- en criminals." "They were he said, adding that "if anyone killed 15 or 30 people, he was no right to live." The interview was recorded in Havana Saturday. Correspondent Jules Dubois of the Chicago Tribune report- ed that the mutilated bodies of 160 anti-Batista prisoners were found yesterday in a mass grave on the outskirts of j Af Wlrcph.U Frank Chionchio Led His Wife, who is in wheelchair and crying, as they left St. Peter hospital in Brooklyn, N. Y., last Tuesday, at that time in doubt about the whereabouts and safety of their daughter. Police to- day say the kidnaped infant has been found alive and healthy in a Brooklyn apartment. Police are holding a 43-year-old widow. Never Gave Up Hope Baby's Return Called Answer to Prayers BY BERNARD GAV7ER New York "I never San Cristobal, 60 miles west of Chionchio, for whom nine nizcd his daughter lately. He had only seen hef gave up hope that Lisa would ;once shortly after be found. My first faith waslhas a bjrtnmark over her left in God. My second in the FBI and the police." These were the words of a jubilant mother, Mrs. Frances Havana. Military authorities in Man- zanillo announced yesterday that Cubans will not be allow- ed to witness the firing squad executions of Batista support- ers, but they will be allowed! to see tho bodies afterward. born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank D. Chionchio, and that of the CilSni _i i i 9 m "jnf VJF ff recovered baby are identical. He also said a small mark his wife and two of his four th DaDy-s left eyelid, de- i------early days of anxiety and agony ended early today with the safe recovery of her kidnaped infant daughter. The 26-year-old high school teacher, who has been on ma- ternity leave, said she first learned the baby was found alive and healthy from her husband, Frank, who tele- he said, "but I really recognized her by her beauti- ful feet and hands." A holiday atmosphere vaded the house a 2-story children at their homei early Vy the fa'ther, showed! Boston Richard ,t today. Sheriff Luther She said she didn't reported The dead were identified as Mrs. Ruth Higgins, 37; Rich- ard, 8; and Bryan, 12. The father, Harry Higgins, 40, who came here from Wal- tham, Mass., about six months ago, was taken to Seminolc county jail in Sanford. He is a technical writer for the Mar- tin company at Orlando. Sher- iff Luther Hodges said he would be charged with mur- der. Turn to Page 4, Col. 7 Firm Named f o Design, Build Space Capsufe Washington McDon- nell Aircraft Corp. of St. Louis phoned from St. Peter's hos-lWas seiected today to design and build a space capsule to Idinal Cushing of Boston has saiu the passenger in the criticized Soviet Deputy Pre- when she would bc first manned satel- mier Anastas I. Mikoyan as WIU1 ncr chjld- bul as a "bloody henchman in kncw the baby ,was beinS The House Writes Of Menommee Council Charles House, the Post- Crescent's new roving re- porter, attended a tribal council ol the Menominee Indians at Keshena ovef the weekend. Hh observa- tions of the fire- ewer cessation of federal CM he found Page A-1S. Another lews story tne aettnues Alt. MW'I murderous crimes for. she could wait by Lenin, Stalin and Khrush- at least for a while. cnev Holiday Atmosphere The Catholic prelate said' Chionchio, 28, a port au- Turn to Page 4, Col. 3 Coast Guard Says Yacht Sinking New Ifork The coast guard said today it had re- ceived a report that a 104-foot yacht, Melba, was sinking 175 sacres of his own free Armcn- fication of the infant, missing1 specifications" set a miles north northeast of Cape ian republjc, the Ukrainian since the night of Jan. 2 when meeting wiln 38 manufactur- Garcia, Honduras. .massacres of 1932-33 arid the she was kidnaped 2i hours aft- d research organiza- The coast guard said a navy Hungarjan v 6 Saturday night crimes include Mikoyan'slthonty lawyer, had been call-l -rweive 'the mas- ed to the hospital for to national aeronautics and space administration said negotiation for a formal con- tract with McDonnell will be- gin immediately. firms submitted on the basis of ship, Gyatt, was the the scene. The only other information available to the coast guard here was that the yacht orig- inally had engine failure yes- terday at a m. It was not known immedi- ately the number aboard the Melba. Ike Planning Series Of Fireside Talks Eisenhower reportedly plans a series of short, fighting fireskle talks to appeal direct- ly to the public for support of his legislative program dur- ing the next two years. Eisenhower has told close associates the battle he will wage for his program will be the most energetic since he was elected. The president and Vice President Nixon have agreed mas s a c r e s 1856." birth. Chionchio baid he rccog- 36 Killed in German Pfane Crash in Brazil lions last November. NASA said a single satellite capsule with its connected equipment is expected to cost over million. NASA said the space cap- sule, to be shot into space by a powerful booster, will be de- signed to carry a human pas- senger through the atmos- phere into orbital flight and Rio de Janeiro the edge of Guanabara bay return him safely to earth, ty-six persons were killed in as the pilot tried to line up "The satellite system will Washington President a West Gorman airlmci which with a runway. provide a means of studying crashed and The Gorman co-pilot, Karl the psychological and physio- burned ypster-Frank, was thrown clear. logical effects of space flight day as it came Stewardess Hilda Dchler and on men." NASA's announce- in to land in a steward struggled out of the ment said, heavy ram at burning wreckage badly in- Galeao Inter- jured. The dead included 29' national air- passenger an 7 crew mem- Warmer Three crew' "We could sec passengers lOOOy members were at the wfndows banging for, Wisconsin __ Variable the only sur- help and screaming as cioudiness and a little McMains vivors. tried to get a fisherman Among the dead were the at the scene reported. to the direct appeal, hurdling American pilot, Capt. Wren The plane hit the ground the heavily Democratic con-.McMains. 48, of Stamford, about two mites from the air- Conn., and 24-year old Coun-port. Rescuers heading for less Maria Elena Kottulinsky the site had to go a long way of Vienna, the daughter of around over muddy roads. Princess Ileana of Romania Tt was Lufthansa's first who now lives in Newton, crash since it began post- Taylor, Mass. ,war operations in April. Woman In Apartment M, suffocated today when fire destroyed the apartment in which she lived. ef few midwest ftata huddle hi St. Pant, Mtmn., after conference in which they agreed thet "people cant before dollars" in the Hml ef .petite gerrteei in their retpettlfe fUrteB. Minnewta OrMHe Free- stMdtof, cwrirafi with Geyturd Nelson, WlfceMte, Hendwi Three Escape The airline uses a number Count Jaroslav Kottulinsky of American pilots becatiM of died with his wife. The couple a shortage of trained Gemm Chief Arnold Bueckert'were on a combined business'fliers. McMaitw, native ef MM the woman's hedy pleasure trip to Ind., was loaned to found in her first floor apart- Three etker wYiv rwciiw VjF The ehtef MM Ike where he has estate D? The 4-enffine latton ef the Lufthansa Werld Airlines in He had been iflnama Air- flying for TWA sMfce Iftl line wet en le Rto from started from a short1 fJorope Africa. A whigllp le ae eJtetm wire. struck Ike >1 ef tee flying was the father ef fevr chil- dren. to it yean eM, kv 'etadinf twine. 1 warmer in most sections today. Partly cloudy to- night and Tuesday. A lit- tle colder north and east portions Tuesday. High to- day mostly in the 30's. Low tonight 10-15. Appleton Tempera- tures for the 24-hour period ending at 9 o'clock: High, 34, tow. 14. Temperature M 11 South wM at ie miles per hear. ttft 11 
                            

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