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Appleton Post Crescent: Friday, January 9, 1959 - Page 1

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   Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - January 9, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                             APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOL.XUXNo.58 26 A, B AmJETON-NONAH-MENASHA, WK., FMDAY, JANUAtY PftEM WHIX 8EBVICE Price Seven Cents another hearing would be call- ed. If this happens, it will be up to the board to decide others such as Ozark Airlines, might be permitted to seek certification to serve the county port. (Leaders in the fight for Fox Cities air service were scheduled to contact Ozark officials today.) North Central, in its petition for reconsideration, did not in- dicate when it will start serv- ice to Outagamie port if the protest is ignored. Frank But- tomer, North Central official earlier said he thought, one or another, it would be in April or May. Did Not Apply In the petition, North Cen- tral said in part: 'Appleton is an Industrie city and does generate good amounts of air traffic. Cur rently it is being served through the Oshkosh airport approximately 20 miles away "North Central believes Ap pleton can receive adequate service through Oshkosh on an east-west basis. North Central did not apply to serve Appleton on Segment 10 (Eau Claire Marshfield) as certi fied by the board. It did re- quest service of Appleton on a north south basis between Minneapolis and Green Bay as an alternate point with Oshkosh. We believe this is the only logical way to serve Appleton and the request should be granted." 7 Killed, 7 Hurt When Ammonia Tank Explodes Prairie du Chien One Airline Says Route Set for County Wrong North Central Wants Service to Alternate With Oshkosh Port BY RICHARD P. POWERS Washington North Central Airlines objects to serving Outagamie County airport by way of Eau Claire and Marshfield and is asking the civil aeronautics board to consider another route. The airlines has told the CAB it believes the only log- ical way to serve the Fox Cit- ies is to alternate some flights now stopping at Winnebago County' airport on Minneapo- lis Green Bay routes. There is no indication how soon the board will rule on the request for reconsideration of its Dec. 9 order. The order was to become effective Feb 16. The board will make its decision without formal hearing. Others Possible If it should reopen this par! of the case involving local service in seven states, their! inhabitants are known to be Ike Challenges Congress to Stay In Budget, Work for Tax Relief Fear 300 Dead as Dam Bursts and Engulfs Village Catastrophe in Spain Said To be Worst in Recent History Zamora, roar- ing wall of water, unleashed by a dam break on Lake San- abria, engulfed the sleeping village of Rivadelago today. Less than 200 of the town's 500 alive. Only 12 hours after what is believed to be the worst catas- trophe in recent Spanish his- tory were rescue workers able to enter the ruins of Rivadela- go as the waters receded. Not even a hurricane could have done more damage. Engineers of the Monaca- Delays Hearing On Teamsters Letts Puts Off Action On Monitors' Plea For Added Power Washington District Judge F. U, S. Dickinson Letts today delayed a bearing on a request of court-appoint- ed monitors lor broader pow- ers to force a cleanup of the teamsters union. Letts put off the hearing on his own motion pending the outcome of an action in the U. S. Court require him union to hold a new conven- tion, elect officers, and there- by get rid of the monitors. Leaves Group Edward Bennett Williams, attorney for the disavowed any man was seriously killed and another injured Thursday night when an ammonia tank exploded at a fertilizer plant. Two policemen were made ill by the gas. Raymond Phillipps, 58, of Prairie du Chien, was killed. Joseph Matosuek, 40, also of Prairie du Chien, was injur- ed. The explosion tore out one wall of a 100 by 150 foot sheet metal building owned by the Wisconsin Farmco Service co- operative. A. C. Tichenor, police chief, said patrolmen blocked o f i several surrounding streets until the ammonia gas clear- ed. Donald Lyons and Frank Benish, two policemen work- ing in the area, were treat- ed for lung irritation after breathing the fumes. Tichenor said the cause ol the blast was unknown and that no estimate of damage was made. Widow of Adm. Horthyj Succumbs in Portugal Lisbon Madeleine de Horthy, widow of Hungary's pro-axis regent, died in the British hospital during the night. She was 77 and bad been ill for weeks. connection with the court oi appeals action. He said he will join Martin F. O'Dono- ghue, chairman of the moni- tors, in asking its dismissal. The court of appeals action was filed earlier this week by John Cunningham of New York and Anthony Distinti, in dividually and as president o New York Teamsters' Loca! 277. of to Appeals to permit the teamsters, teamsters' Cunningham, once a bitter foe of teamster Presiden James R. Hoffa, in recen months has disassociatec himself from a group of New York rank and file members who brought suit last fall to bar Hoffa from taking office >ril Hydroelectric company istimated more than 230 mil- ion cubic feet of water had wept down the drop onto the village shortly after midnight. The roar from the bursting dam and swirling wa- ter was heard in the villages ive miles away. Pouring rain, flooding the dam for the last month, added to the horror of the scene. Houses in Rivadelago, a .own of 500 inhabitants, were swept away as if made cardboard. The dam broke at a. m. Most villagers were asleep. All fire trucks and ambu- ances, troops garrisoned in Zamora and members of the alange party youth front were immediately ordered to :he scene. The Monacabril Power sta- ion, on the western edge of the lake, and employes on duty there also were engulf- ed by the wall of water. The disaster occurred in one of the most inaccessible sec- ions of Spain. It posed no :hreat to American forces, whose nearest base is at Ma- drid, 190 miles to the south- east. Telephone and telegraph connections with Rivadelago were out, and the road from the village to Pueblo de San- abria was washed out in a number of places, making rescue operations difficult. Cabinet Meets Provincial Gov. Juan Muril- Lo took personal charge of the rescue operations. The Vega de Tera dam, the one which broke, was 112 feet high with a capacity of 234 million cubic feet of water. The difference in level be- tween the dam and Rivadela- go is feet. Troops and members of the falange youth front were try- ing to reach Rivadelago by boat. In Madrid the cabinet met under the presidency of Gen Francisco Franco and sent Lt Gen. Jorge Vigon, minister of Economy, Safety At Stake, He Says Eisenhower today chal- lenged the heavily Democratic new congress to meet the communist threat by living within his billion budget and working toward tax relief ''in the foreseeable fu- ture." In a state of the Union message outlining administra- tion plans for building a better and stronger America in this space age of catastrophic war possibilities, the pres- ident said his formula is designed to preserve this na- tion's way of life. Useless expenditures, he said, "might tend to under- mine the economy and therefore the nation's safe- Turn to Page 5, Col. 4 Drunken Drivers Since Jan. 1 AP Wlrtph.it" President Eisenhower Delivered His State of the Union message before a joint session of congress this morning. Vice President Nixon and Speaker Rayburn are seated behind him. Eastern Rail Mergers Seen New York Central Directors Favor Additional New York A possibili- ty of other Eastern railroad mergers arose today from the short-lived and busted ro- mance of the New York Cen- tral and Pennsylvania rail- Johnson Plan Wins First Senate Test Vote Is 60 to 36 for Compromise on Filibusters Want Larger Part in Policy House Republicans Seek Recognition From White House ty." His address, delivered in person at a joint session, of the senate and house, also set forth these other highlight proposals calling for: 1. Enactment of new civil rights legislation to be sub- mitted to congress soon. With- out being specific about the legislation, the president de- _ plored closing of some public i tie newjscnools in tne inlegration con- jtroversy, and pledged anew Washington Republican leaders in house are calling for rnorejh JU t u recognition by the W h i t action nee House in formulating future legislative policy. Notice that the Republican minority in congress does not intend to be a White House "rubber stamp" came from Rep. Charles A. Halleck, newly elected the house. Halleck told newsmen yes- terday that one of his objec- Photo of New Governor In Today's Paper A full-color photo of GOT. Mrs. Nelson can be found on A-12 in to- day's society section. Tak- en at Madison during the inauguration ceremonies by a Post-Crescent newt service photographer it is an example of the color work possible on the press. This photo Is another of the carried ftjnt- to help fva4ert keep roads. The Central directors sug- gested yesterday that a study be made to create three or four rail systems in the east. Pending that, they added, no further steps should be taken toward a corporate merger of the Central with the Pennsyl- vania. This was a fairly bitter bill for the Pennsylvania, al- though the Central directors sweetened it with the state- ment that they were pleased with results of the merger study and urged immediate "appropriate coordination of facilities which would result in substantial savings." Discussed for Years James Symes, president of the Pennsylvania, said he was "amazed" the Central wasn't 7. Clifford WHke, 32, of 400lgoing to go on with steps to- ward merger. Washington The sen- ate today turned down a key proposal desinged by civil rights advocates to clear the way for a tight new curb on filibusters. The roll call vote, 60-36, was the first test of strength in the swirling battle over rules touched off with the start of the new senate session two days ago. It marked a striking victory for Democratic Leader Lyn- don B. Johnson (D-Tcxas) and other Democratic and Re- publican senate leaders back- ing a compromise offered by Johnson. ton P. Anderson An- derson's aim was to establish that each new scnate has the right to adopt its own rules by majority vote at the start of a session. The anti-filibuster forces were still far from giving up. They said that if they lost out on this first round, they would essary to enforce the law as interpreted by the courts. 2. New laws aimed at wip- ing out "corruption, racket- eering, and abuse of power and trust in labor-manage- ment affairs." Eisenhower ex pressed disappointment the last congress, also Democrat- ic-controlled, did not act in this field despite disclosures lives was a "real close coop- by the senale rackets lnvest' cration" between congress and the White house in the future. No Rubber Stamp Halleck underscored his po- sition by designating the pres- ident's programs as "Rcpubli- can-Kisenhower" programs. "The Republican minority in the house is not going to be Main Points in Ike's Message on State of Union Washington Here i n outline are the main points of rubber he President Eisenhower' Hmo- i of the Union message I adding: "By that, I mean that in s state message today: Over-all objective: "To pro- change ihe next iwi years we are -trength and .county. more to their liking Johnson's I 
                            

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