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Appleton Post Crescent Newspaper Archive: January 5, 1959 - Page 1

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Publication: Appleton Post Crescent

Location: Appleton, Wisconsin

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   Post Crescent, The (Newspaper) - January 5, 1959, Appleton, Wisconsin                             APPLETON POST CRESCENT VOLXLDCNo.54 34 Pages-factions A. B WIS. MONDAY, JANUAtY WUUE Price Seven Onto Mostof Nation Held in Grip OfColdWave Frigid Air Moves Steadily Toward South and East 'By the Associated Press Most of the nation was en- veloped in the season's est weather today. A massive blast of icy air, which was spawned in the Arctic region and moved into the northern Rockies with the new year, continued its slow but steady sweep south and eastward across the country By early morning the frigid air, powered by brisk norther- ly winds, reached the Atlan tic coast and gulf coasta areas. Winds from 20 to 35 rn.p.h. whipped the cold air from the tower Great Lakes region southward to the Vir- ginias and- eastward to New Jailed After Silence on News Source England. Bitter cold clung to wide areas in the mid-continent and sections of the Rockies. The cold and snow was blamed for at least 15 deaths. New York Newspa- per columnist Marie Torre surrendered today to begin serving a 10- day jail sen- tence rather than disclose a news source. Miss Torre, who writes a synd i c a t e d television and radio column for the New Miss Tone York Herald Tribune, appeared before Federal District Judge Syl- vester J. Ryan and was re- manded to custody of a mar- shal at a.m. "I have great hope that this action will lead to legis- lation which will protect newsman's she told reporters as she arrived at the courthouse. The 34-year-old mother of two children was accompan- ed to the courthouse by her husband, Hal Friedman, television producer. Ryan had found Miss Torre in contempt for refusing disclose the source of a story she wrote in 1957 concerning movie star Judy Garland. Nelson Says Higher Taxes Needed for Public Services At. least three persons were found frozen to death. Others died from over-exertion while shoveling snow and in traffic accidents on ice-slicked high- ways. Florida Awaits Freeze Farmers in Florida as far south as Ocala, in the north- central region, got their smudgepots ready when they heard the cold wave forecast Southeast Florida basked in summer-like climes, with an- other day of 70-degree weath- er in sight. Below freezing forecasts in the normally sub-tropical low- er Rio Grande valley worried owners of citrus and vegeta- ble farms. Most of the deep south braced for below freezing weather. Schools closed in some Tex- as communities. Industry was hit in Texas and Colorado. Natural gas consumption was curtailed to several cities in Texas, in- Position Not Changed Miss Torre was dressed in black as she stood silently be- fore Judge Ryan. "Has the defendant chang- ed her position in this mat- the judge asked. "Her position remains the said Mathias Correa, her attorney. "It is no differ- ent than that taken before." Judge Ryan immediately ordered: 'The defendant is remand- ed to the custody of the mar- shal to begin serving her sen- tence.' Youth Dies as Speeding Car Skids Of (Road Walter Guyette Promises to Work For Entire State The Shattered Remains of a 1955 car in which Walter H. Guyette, 17, 313 Elm street, New London, met death rest on an embankment just off Highway 47 about 1V4 miles south of Black Creek. Guyette died instantly Sunday night as he was thrown from the hurtling car. Police said he lost control as he attempted to pass another auto. Three youths in Guyette's car received cuts and bruises. BY JOHN WYNGAARD Text of Speech on Page A9 Gaylord Nelson today assumed the duties of chief executive of Wisconsin with the solemn _ r warning that the people of Wisconsin must be prepared Owtagamie County s to sacrifjce some Of their resources for higher taxes to First 1959 Fatality support modern governmental service demands. The inaugural speech of the first Democrat to take Waiter H. Guyette, 17, 313 Qver controi of the state in 26 years was a somber one, Elm street, New London, was! containing expressions of humility before challenges he killed instantly about p caned great and difficult, but which he said also he m. Sunday when his speeding .pr0p0ses to face without delay or equivocation. car hurtled off Highway 47 Central to the problem, he told an audience in the about li miles south of Black statphouse rotunda for the inaugural ceremonies at noon, Creek. is the fact that the state must pay for "critically needed Guyette apparently lost services out of a revenue structure producing insufficient control of the car as he at-'dollars." tempted to pass another He didn't mention specific figures, but most of his northbound auto, county po- audience was aware that his recent budget healings dis- lice said. The youth died as closed spending demands far higher than current state Torre turned to courtroom, the As Miss leave the judge said: "If you change your mind, Cosmic Rocket Due to Enter Orbit of Sun This Week Turn to Page 12, Col. 1 West Germany Rejects Soviet Plan for Berlin eluding Dallas Worth, because and Fort of heavier than normal domestic de- mands for the fuel. Temperatures dropped to 25 degrees below zero yesterday in the Texas'panhandle. How- ever, there was a general moderation and the worst of the cold snap appeared end- ed. Oklahoma had its coldest weather in 12 years over the weekend and not much relief was reported today. One of the lowest readings was -19 Turn to Page B12, Col. 2 Traffic Deaths Increase to 376 By The Associated Press The count of traffic deaths during the New Year's holi- day neared its end today with indications that the 4-day toll would be smaller than expect- ed. Delayed reports of fatal traffic accidents that occur- red up to midnight Sunday were expected to add a few Bonn West Germany today rejected Russia's pro- posal to turn West Berlin into i demilitarized free city and called on Moscow to restore the city to its place as capital of a united Germany. In a note delivered in Mos- cow the government stressed :he 4-power responsibility for German reunification and backed up the previous re- jection of the Soviet proposal by the western Big three. Berlin's future can be dis- cussed only within the frame- work of the whole German question, which is indissolubly bound up with the problems of security and disarmament, the note said. West Germany is ready to contribute toward the solu- tion of all these problems "in frank discussions which are not burdened by preconditions and ultimalive it continued. The 25-page note said point- edly that the Soviet proposal would place isolated Berlin at Observations Now Completed, Moscow Announcement States BY K. MILKS Moscow The Soviet Union's rocket contin- ued its headlong dash toward a solar orbit today in man's greatest conquest of space. Its radio signals ceased as the li ton called Mechta (dream) went past miles in its plunge away from the earth. It had then been in flight 62 hours. Resources for feeding the radio equipment had become exhausted, the Soviet news agency Tass said. "The program of observa- tions and scientific investiga- tions of the rocket has been an announcement said. Maximum Orbit This' predicted ttie rocket will finally enter an orbit around the sun Wednesday or Thursday. It is due to go into orbit between the orbits of the earth and Mars. Mechta is due to take 15 months to go around the sun, traveling el- liptically. The Russians calculate this orbit would have a maximum diameter of 214J million ing it lunik, a combination of iuna (moon) and sputnik. Scientists here figured that it was travelling at a maxi- mum speed of 2.45 kilometers (1.52 miles) a second when it passed the moon yesterday at a distance of miles. Results of radio transmis- sions between the rocket and ground stations will be pub- lished as soon as they are an- alyzed, Tass said. The 62 hours of radio com- munication enabled observa- tions to be made of the rock- et's movements, and on the work of the scientific instru- ments aboard. The actual number of days that will be required for the solar orbit will be 447, scien- deaths to the tabulation. Traffic took 376 lives, the mercy of the communist East German regime. Bonn said that not even the pres- ence of U.N. observers, sug- gested by Moscow, would less- en the danger because it is 60 well-known that no U.N. group persons died in fire accidents ever had been permitted to and 113 in miscellaneous acci- operate in Communist tern- dents, a total of 549. Sergeant Held in Hit-and-Run Death Tokyo Master Sgt. James W. Fields, Jr., 35, Mad- ison, Wis., was held by U.S. Air Force authorities today in connection with the hit- and-run death of a Japanese maid on New Year's day. Fields was taken into cus- tody by air police at Yokota Air Force base outside Tokyo, authorities said, after U.S. and Japanese police discover- ed his damaged car in a ga- rage near the base. Fields then admitting hit- ting Miss Meiko Sukizaki. 28, the air force said. New Democrat ic Administration Featured Today A look at Wisconsin's first Democratic administration, in almost M years is tanrf la today Included are stories on the of Nelson, hss staff, Ms Turn to Page 12, Col. 1 Truman Invited to Address Pres ident Truman has been invit ed to address a 13-state Demo- cratic Midwest conference in Milwaukee March 5-7, Mrs miles. The rocket would get no nearer the sun than million miles. The sun is 93 million miles from the earth. The name Mechta was ap- plied to the rocket today by Pravda. When it was an- nounced last Saturday that the rocket was headed toward the moon Russians began call- Urnitia ty vice chairman said Sun- day. She also told the state Dem- ocratic Administrative com- mittee that ten Democratic governors also are expected for the sessions. The commitU Milwaukee the 1960 Demo- cratic state convention to be held in May or June. wflMr? ef eflke to Qeytartf Havana Under Martial Law Put Into Effect Pending Arrival of Provisional Chief Havana Havana pro- vince was proclaimed under martial law temporarily to- d a y pending the arrival of provis i o n a 1 Pre s i d e n t Manuel Urru- tia. Urrutia was reported a 1- ready in the province, but his arrival in the city itself apparently was being delayed while revolutionary groups straighten out jurisdiction over the presidential palace. Earlier today Urrutia was erroneously reported to have arrived by plane at Havana's international airport for a triumphal entry into the city. The revolutionary leader, Fidel Castro, who rooted Dic- tator-President Fulgencia Ba- tista from power on New Year's day and proclaimed Urrutia the provisional execu- tive, meanwhile, was making a leisurely but victorious ap- proach to the capital through the eastern provinces. For the first time since the departure of Batista the cap- ital looked almost normal, with stores open and traffic flourishing. 3 Persons Dead Of Charcoal, Vehicle Fumes Milwaukee T u m e si from charcoal burners and an automobile engine took the lives of three persons during Wisconsin's weekend of frigid weather. Dale ITeaston, 15, Bcloit, died Sunday when a charcoal he oxygen he fell from the skidding car income, when it hit a post. He was dragged to the center of a side road. He received crush- ing chest and head injuries, Outagamie County Coroner Bernard H. Kemps said. Guyette became the first 1990 highway death in Outa- gamie county. Last year the first fatality occurred Feb. 1ft. His death was the twelfth on Wisconsin highways over the New Year holiday weekend and brought the 1959 state toll to 9, compared with 11 on Jan. 5 a year ago. j Three teenagers in Guy- ette's car were injured, none critically. The car which Guy- ette was attempting to pass was not involved in the crash. County police said Guyette's MikoyanSet To See Dulles No Indicated for Their Conference Washington Old bol shevik Anastas 1. Mikoyan insisting he 18 just on vaca tion, set up a no-holds-barred talk about the cold war with1 Sec. of State Dulles today. The 63-year-old Soviet first car skidded 143 feet off the flew into New highway to a power pole, v Nelson said that his long- range goal is to encourage he expansion of the Wis- consin economy to such an extent that taxes won't be ncreased "too sharply." But he said the senate needs jreat sums of new money im- mediately. Proposes Reforms "We can close our eyes but the problem will not go away. To those who would neglect our schools, or colleges, and public welfare activities and broke off a 6-inch supporting pole, rolled end over end 25 feet to an embankment (where Guyette's body fell from the hurtled 67 feet York City yesterday and drove directly to Washington. At New York's airport, he studiously ignored a group of Turri to Page B12, Co. 6 Geneva Parley Back in Session Geneva Negotiations of the BJg Three powers for a controlled suspension of nu- clear weapons trsts resumed today after a 2-week holiday recess. Representatives of the Unit- ed States, Britain and the So- viet Union met again in the palace of nations. Their discussions were ex- pected to center at once on the whole problem of control. The western powers want as- surances that the Russians will accept a truly internation- al inspection system to inves- tigate suspicious disturbances anywhere in the world without political interference. The Russians want veto power over the operation. The western plan calls for a network of 180 control posts and some international employees. No estimate of the cost has been made public. Hungarian refugees, some of tal cost of your statc govern. whom yelled "murderer and 'communist dog" at him. A larger contingent waited in in the fast pace of this mod. vain at the Soviet U. N. mis- sion headquarters on Park avenue, which he by-passed to travel to Washington. Today, however, some of the same determined picket- ers arranged to march with placards outside the state de- partment, where Mikoyan had his appointment with Dul- les. Both Mikoyan and state department officials indicated Drunken Drivers Since Jon. 1 4. Thomas Quinitcy, route J, Chllton. (Story on B-12) For an account of job patronage prospects under the new Democratic state administration, see John Wyngaard's column on the editorial page toddy. institutions, our highways and conservation resources, I say spend more money on cigarcts. liquor, cosmetics and other luxuries than the to- ment. If we have not com- pletely lost our sense of values Turn to Page 12, Col. 3 ern world, then the question in its proper perspective is real- ly this are you willing to give up a few personal luxur- ies In exchange for a creative investment in our Nelson said that his new ad- ministration will be handicap- ped by archaic state and lo- cal governmental _organiza- tion. and proposed reorganiz- ation reforms. But he said also that he docs not propose action or change "for the sake of doing something different." The new governor had a promise for his political oppo- sition. No Simple Solution "To who were disap- pointed in the outcome (of election) I give my assurance that this administration will Anastas Mikoyan Parents Awaif News About Kidnaped Baby Turn to Page 3, Col. 5 Smallpox Booster Shots at Embassy Bonn All U S. em- bassy personnel have been asked to get smallpox boost- er shots as a result of the out- break of the disease in West Germany. Minister William C. Trim- ble in a memo suggested the vaccinations as a protective measure and said there was nothing to be alarmed about. No Americans have fallen ill with tne disease, but some 10 Germans have contracted it in the Heidelberg and Kai- serslautem areas. 49th Sf of e Has New York Mr. on the alert for Nothing On Us frtA frit waited a heavy-set bleached blonde supply in a closed car as waited for his father and twin for some news to- brother, Dean, to finish Ing for small near A Spraguc, Juneau county th ,nxiety. Dennis Dickhut, 17, Milwau- kee, suffocated Saturday when charcoal burner set fire to ttie cardboa-d shack he was while Ice fishing on the f.oek rirer near Jefferson. He WM vtnlUng his grandparents, Mr. Mn. Joseph Dickhut, Tho toody of Bee Miller, 77, Ortea, wes la hto Greet Caeaty Weektaf aaid An intense, a g o n i r. i n g search by po- lice and FBI agents contln- for the mining Infant. She was taken from a fourth- floor nursery of 9t. Peter's hospital hi Brooklyn Friday aluht, With. MM Mt BMWtfay y aftilMin trtt MM ft 1 V rOHCW Ml Si town after sjo leees, believed to be the kidnaper.1 She was seen loitering in the! hospital before the kidnaping. Transportation employes kcptj an especially watchful look-i out. tVaWlfelti San Francisco police sent! here a description of a woman who took a baby from Mt.i Zlon hospital there three years ago. The description fit-, the woman seen at St. Peter's. The California woman was Mentitted as Mrs. Betty Jean! Bewcetcto, 919 who is wanted wt jws OTIO Wisconsin Fair and continued cold today with afternoon tempera t u r c s ranging around icro. Clear and cold tonight, with lows below zero. Outlook for Wednesday, cloudy and warmer. Aeetetoa Tempera- tures for the 24-hour period ending at 9 o'clock: High, 6 below, low. 12 below. Temperature at 11 o'clock, tero. South wind at It miles per hour. Barometer, 30.47 inches. Weather map on Page Sun sets at p.m., ris- es Tuesday at a.m.: IS.CM.S IN FW SPA PERI IF.WSPA.PFJ   

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