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Charleston Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 6, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Charleston Gazette

Location: Charleston, West Virginia

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   Charleston Gazette (Newspaper) - October 6, 1954, Charleston, West Virginia                                Chemical Center Of The World The Charleston Gazette The State You Read or Sec the Big INS, I7P FOEECA8T Meetly cloudy cooler with Wednesday. (Details on Pace Wednesday Morning, October 6, 1954 Alt 24 Cents Mayor. Slaps Broad Scale Of Book Ban Copenhaver Says He'll Battle Ordinance Originally Intended to Curb Extremes In 'Comic Books9 Available to Children By Don Seagle (Staff Writer for The Gazette) Mayor Copenhaver said he was surprised yes- terday at the broad scope of a proposed ordinance regulating reading material in Charleston anc added he would "vigorously oppose" city council "'adopting it. The mayor said introduction at Monday's "was one of said neither Flags Wave As Trieste Hails Italy of Port Tito Terms Settlement Reasonable TRIESTE, Oct. cheers of citizens massed in a great waterfront square proclaimed to- day that Trieste is Italian again. The citizens gathered in Unity Square of this port city to rejoice over the announcement in Lon- don that Italian and Yugoslavia diplomats had initialed an agree- ment dividing the disputed free territory of Trieste between the two countries. The emotional out- burst here carried a note of relief that the long quarrel which some- times threatened to draw Italians and Yugoslavs into a shooting war was over. mayor of the ordinance meeting of council those things" and he nor a citizens' study commit tee had considered a measure so far reaching in authority. The ordinance, as presented, he continued, was lifted almost verbatim from that used in an- other city and had neither been studied nor proposed by the citixens' group. Originally, a number of private individuals had formed an "In decent and Objectionable Comic Books Committee" based on elim ance would be council meeting. ination of books from undersiirable comii city news stands. Mayor Copenhaver endorsee that aim and promised an ordin introduced at a HE SAID he was "as surprise artment declined to 'outside may in the demonstrations. Reporters who visited schools public schools in W; found no sign of a dii vancement of White I That organization ought desegregation i _ind now is campaignin Maryland, of Negro pupils has not b The name of the ne tion is a take-off on 1 Assn. for the Advancei ored People, whose o: mixed schools. children home to prevent (Please Tarn to Page 8 Col. 3) Inside Today (Please Turn to Page 8 Col. 3) Burdett Denies Union Pressure State Orders Painting Boss Off County Courthouse Job By Bayard F. Ennis (Staff Waiter for The Gazette) Local labor leaders who lost which, he said, li thur to completion job which he reportedly waiting tor oct. s wv- man- c yn Monroe, bedded upstairs with c y which upset and a virus, sued p o be DiMaggio for divorce today >ns, the former baseball hero p ito himself comfortable down- s vhere in the home they still share. a jody stayed nd suit, filed in nearby Santa a lite through her attorney, such mental cruelty but cited j specific instances. r former star outfielder of e New York Yankees caused j on screen's No.' 1 box office at- j The "grievous mental suffer- from and anguish" through no the of hers, the action said. be as her attorney had pre- j "ecent it was an "innocuous" com- sregation of the type often filed by Hollywood folk. The briel lent said which spelled an end to the of the year's most celebrated esman gave the date of the rights last Jan. 14 in San Fran- >ss any fed-4- date of the separation, Sept. st. The just before DiMaggio went East say w nether be cover the World Series for a syndicate, and said are no ed the and no community of the jshington ect link THE PRINCIPALS have the recently for the in seclusion in their English-style Beverly Hills home since Deople. successfully n Dalaware ig in Monroe surprised Hollywooc with the news of their breakup yesterday. ept for actress' attorney, Jerry white held an hour and a half een w the cnent of fficers headed by rlington, and Marilyn -esistance Split Club officials Break's Wake nts keeping, 'vent YORK, Oct. 5 W) The Monroe-Joe DiMaggio split e 8 Col. had severe repercussions in today the combined Fan Club also the parting of the ways. Simakow, head of the DiMaggio group, said they entirely with reports that was irked about Marilyn's pictures. "Too reveal- for a married she 5 a reporter. Martin Balan, chief of the Marilyn enthusiasts (all males) in the said he had personally spent dted on long distance telephone f an inside orHv trying to reacn Marilyn in conference with Miss Monroe to- day and later reported her "upset ihysically and emotionally." When he served the divorce pa- pers on DiMaggio in the down- stairs living room the ex-athlete accepte'd them "very complacently and very Giesler said. The attorney told newsmen there no need for a property settle- ment "because there is no prop- erty involved. What she has earned hers. What he has earned is his.' If DiMaggio decides not to con- gest the divorce it could go to trial in six weeks, Giesler said. If he BEFORE HE TOOK the stand his attorney, Daniel B. Maher, told the committee that Powell is under subpoena to appear before a fed- eral grand jury tomorrow. The grand jury probe of Powell's ac- tivities was ordered by Atty. Gen Brownell. Cassel said Powell demanded the payment when he went to Powell's office seeking an in creased loan commitment oh May Strike Idles Gotham's Port 71 Vessels Walkout May Spread NEW YORK, Oct. 5 In Police ternational Longshoremen's Assn all but done for a few months ago, struck the New York waterfront today in a bold display of oldtime power. Seventy-one ships were caught in port. There was no violence. The in two by interunion rivalry less than five months to the- sndden strike call with the smooth, shoulder to shoulder precision that was an ILA trade- mark during the union's heyday. Tugs were not struck at the ou set and the huge liners Queer Mary and the Independence were docked routinely. However, water borne picket lines were being or 3ride 's Kin Slay Groom At Beckley Couple Packing to Go To Texas; Her Father, Brother Held by Cops BECKLEY, Oct. 5 young x-Army corporal was shot to death oday 20 hours after his wedding nd State Police -aid the father nd brother of the bride would be barged with murder. The victim was Andrew Garcia Miramontez, 27, of Lubbock, Tex., who formerly was stationed near Beckley with (he 1428th Army Engineer Co. Miramom- tez and Miss Nina Eva Woiceho- vich, 21, ef nearby Lanark, were married last night in the First Christian Church here. State Trooper C. M. England aid the bride's father, Charles Voicehovich, 64, and his son Joe ifoicehovich, 31, orally admitted he shooting. The father and son. Doth coal miners, were placed in Raleigh County jail here tonight after lengthy questioning by State ganized to try to turn back th tugs. "There is a strong possibility that the men in other ports from Portland, Me., to Hampton Roads fair Mansions. He said Powell tol  i 'i 13 Kids Admit Damaging Auto In Gang Fight Thirteen young children, all be- tween the ages of six and eight, told Sgt. Frank Riddle yesterday long." He said DiMaggio has been living downstairs since the sepa- ration. Miss Monroe missed work at her studio yesterday and again today and there was no indication when she would go back. Giesler said the matter of a news conference at which one or both members of the famed couple might cite reasons for their split is still up in the air pending Miss Monroe's recovery. In her announcement yesterday Marilyn blamed "incompatibility" and career conflict. DiMaggio has remained silent. Supporters Plead 'Tough Fight9 Ahead out last Friday in a showdown before being taken away' under with the Kanawha County two-to-10 year sentence for Page Amusements 17 Astrological Forecast Bob Considihe Comic Pages 18-1! Crossword Puzzle 18 Editorials, Columns 6, ._ _ ____ Gazette Want Ads 20-23 standing, McArthur, a Charles- Market Reports over the use of prison labor for repairs to the courthouse yester- day appeared to have scored a partial victory. The boss of the paint job, George McArthur, was sum- marily removed from the coun- ty jail and transferred to the Huttonsville medium security prison by order of the State Board of Control. According to a prior under- forgery. "It was agreeable with me that McArthur be returned to do that Burdett stated. "When they put him to work on the outside of the building, I that the inside job was done, and ordered his trans- fer." 20 Obituary, Funerals 8 Radio-Television 17 Sports Pages.............. 14-15 Women's Activities..........9-11 tonian, would have been avail- able for work here until Nov. 6. Joe F. Burdett, president of the board, charged the county with violating an agreement with, him BURDETT DENIED that labor union objections to the use of prison labor by the County Court had anything to do with his action though he admitted that it was union representatives Tun to CM. the marriage going. HE FAILED, but he said he thought the girls should have at least a try at reaching Joe on a similar mission. The clubs combined nine months ago, when Joe and Mar- ilyn were married. In time, Bal- an and Miss Simakow began keeping company themselves. Whether their friendship was at an end because of the differences over Joe and Marilyn was not quite clear. But Balan said, "I just hope Rosylyn comes to her senses about me, that is." they were guilty of seriously dam- aging the automobile of a hospital- ized man. James Britt of Kirk Ct., Little- page Terrace, discovered the seemingly wanton vandalism after he returned from a hospital where he had been receiving treatment for a broken leg. He said he left his car on a parking lot at the housing project and when he returned found it had smashed headlights, broken grill, three shattered windows, a broken windshield, broken spot- please Turn to Page 8 Col. 7) FEDERAL mediators were striv ing for a truce as customs tabi lators said practically the whol port was at a standstill. Fiftee ships were being worked at Arm piers or docks where longshoreme are not needed. Mayor Robert F. Wagner offere his assistance in the, dispute. I said he understood the strikers an the shipping firms were "not to far apart." On the face of it, a contract di pute over retroactivity and arb tration touched off the strike. Bu it also appeared to be a gesture of defiance toward the New Yor New Jersey Waterfront Commi sion, a state-originated agency 1 police and control the docks. The commission's executive d rector, Samuel M. Lane, only la: Saturday renewed the old accusa tion that the ILA is gangste dominated. Similar charges wer made by the AFL more than year ago in ousting the ILA. THE STRIKE began at midnigh The few longshoremen crews wor. ing the night shift-walked off th (Please Turn 5) Today's Definition Schoolboy A lad who thinks that five daj of school make one weak. s Ike, GOP Chiefs to Huddle on Election; President Urged to Beef Up Campaign DENVER, Oct. 5 Eisenhower today called Republic- an congressional leaders to a po- strategy conference here Friday amid signs he may heed party chiefs and step up his per- sonal campaign for election of a GOP Congress. The Denver White House an- nounced the chief executive and a group of lop Republicans in the legislative branch will meet about two hours in advance of the President's nationwide radio- television campaign address Fri- day night p, m., EST. The leaders and Vice President Nixon, who also will be on the coast to coast program, all are scheduled to be on the speakers platform with Eisenhower at a big political rally in Municipal Audi- originate from the au- ditorium. Eisenhower aides are saying the President's address will be his hardest hitting effort of the cam- on the basis of in- creasing reports from GOP lead- ers that the party faces a "tough fight" to maintain control of Con- gress. ENGLAND SAID a grand jury would be asked to indict both on murder charges. Investigating State Police gave this account: Miramontez and Miss Woice- wanted to marry while he still was in the Army and stationed at nearby Prince, but her parents objected. Since his discharge, Mir- amontez has been employed by the IVest Texas Compress Co. at bock. State Police said Miss vich now has a 14-month-oM baby, of whom Miramontez is the father. Miramontez, accompan- ied by his sister, returned here from Texas Sunday to marry the Lanark girl. After Miramontez visited the Woicehovich home at Lanark, the couple obtained from Circuit Judge Norman Knapp a waiver of the state's three day waiting period so they could marry and Mira- (Please Turn to Page 8 Col. 4) leck did on Sunday, Simpson made it plain to newsmen hi would like to see the Presiden make more campaign speeches than the two now Friday night and the mainly a get-out-the-vote ap- Nov. 1, election eve. The White House indicated to- day that Eisenhower may decide to play a more active role. Murray Snyder, assistant press secretary, said the President is considering "several" invitations to make ad- ditional political addresses. Snyder made the statement in re- CIO to Purge Fund Rackets WASHINGTON, Oct. CIO today created a standing com- mittee to search out any irregular handling of rich union welfare funds and to oust any racketeers discovered. The action taken unanimously by the CIO Executive Board also pledged cooperation mth federal and state investigators and said if additional legislation is found necessary, as President Eisen- hower has suggested, the CIO will support it. CIO President Walter Reuther said the standing committee was charged with ferreting out any "unethical practices" whereby un- ion leaders might enrich them- selves unjustly and still not be technically violating any law. "The the board said, "fur- thermore will not delay action to prevent or remedy abuses until a case has been formally established in the courts. Just as we did in expelling Communist unions, we will, in accordance with our own democratic procedures, take prompt and effective action on our own initiative against financial cor- ruption by union officials." (Please Turn to Page 8 Col. J) Sell Your "Don't With a Gazette Want Ad Scores are selling no-longer-used, items for cash via Gazette Want Ads. It's so easy to insert an ad that will sell these, lor instance: TYPEWRITER SOLD THE LATEST SUCH report was put before the President today by Rep. Richard Simpson of Pennsyl- vania, chairman of the Republican Congressional Campaign Commit- jsponse to inquiries about Nixon s tee. But Simpson said after last night that Eisenhow- meeting with Eisenhower while the going will be rough, he looks for the party to gain 15 to 20 seats in the House. torium here. The broadcast will As House Majority Leader Hal- er probably would make a major campaign address in the Washing- ton (D. C.) area about Oct. 20. (Please Turn to Page 8 Col. 8) SMITH-CORONA 0-0000._________ portable typewriter. TUB-LAVATORY SOLD BATH tub lavatory. Good 0-0000. DOZEN WANTED COUCH COUCH (double bed Oood. 0-0000. _ SHOTGUN SOLD GAUGE pump. 0-0000. GAS RANGE SOLD GAS range, good cond. 0-0000. You'll get quick cash results with. GAZETTE Want Dial   

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