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Charleston Daily Mail: Wednesday, May 18, 1966 - Page 1

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   Charleston Daily Mail (Newspaper) - May 18, 1966, Charleston, West Virginia                             THE WEATHER SCATTERED showers and thun- djwhowers tontfht, tow near 60. unxlay partly ckwdy, (Jharlrston FINAL EDITION CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 18, 1966 TEN cam STUCK TACHOMETER AND SPEEDOMETER IN FATAL ACCIDENT -DaDy Man Phato by Chester Bawn Motorcycle Crash In City Kills Two A young man and woman died instantly today at a. m. when their motorcycle crashed at high speed into an automobile at Morris and Virginia streets. Pronounced dead on arrival at Charleston General Hospital were Mrs. Mary Fern (Gilienwater) Withrow, 26, of 8 White Ave., Armor Park, South Charleston, and Frederick C. Helm, 24, of 1311 Mac- Corkle Ave. SE. Helm was graduated Jan. 22 from Morris Harvey College ADDITIONAL PHOTO ON PG. I With a and a had been employed by die State Department of Welfare. His tame town is Bradfordwood.. Pa., and college rftord. list his parents as Mr. tod Mrs. Rich- ard C. Helm. The motorcycle driven Helm east on Virginia Street til it crashed into the right front by of the car. The motorcycle catapulted to Ut a car gotag south on Morris the steps leading into the front driven by Marvjfr Jordon, 23, of New York City, aooomMnietf by investigating officer, said Jor- ttoo and visiting in Mont- gomery. Neither suffered injury, bat Cochran said the tragedy caused Jordon to go into mo- Red Chinese Links Advised By McNamara mentary shock and become hysterical. Charleston Memorial Hospital said Jordon was admitted at Cocbran said was in no condition to make a state- ment. He added out ugbt and that neither Jordon saw the motorcycle un- entrance of Mountain State- Hos- pital. The cycle speedometer tjUUUlas M hatr. and dw tachometer stuck at Patrolman C. R. Cochran, die revolutions per minute. Both occupants were thrown don and Malham are on vaca- into die street. Mrs. Withrow's left leg was severed. She also bad a crushed skull and crushed chest. Helm had neck, leg and jaw fractures and a ruptured liver. Capt. Lawrence Morris of the police Accident Investigation Bureau said die deaths made a total of four traffic fatalities this year in Charleston. They were the first Involving motor- cycle riders. However, six cycle riders were injured in April and four have been hurt this month, some of them seriously. The deaths made a total of 27 traffic fatalities this year in Ka- MONTREAL W) U S Sec- County and 159 in West rotary of Defense Robert S. Me Virginia. On this date a year Namara called today for steps to "build bridges" toward Red China as a means of avoiding war. "We can do so with properly balanced trade relations, diplo- matic contacts, and in som cases even by exchanges of mili tary McNamara said In a speech prepared for the American Society of Newspaper Editors, McNamara spoke hi philosophical terms of U.S. rela tionships with potential enemies as well as with underdevelppet countries and with allied nations He made only bare mention o Viet Nam and then only indirect ly. SAIGON Rebel fire brought down a small US. spotter plane hi Da Nang late today after Premier Nguyen Cao Ky's opponents poured 500 more antigovemment troops into that dissident northern not bed. Ky made a brief visit to Da Nang earlier to rally support and The defense secretary said swear in his new military commander for the northern provinces. "breaching the isolation of grea nations like Red China re- duces the danger of potentially catastrophic misunderstandings and increases the incentive on both sides to resolve disputes by reason rather than by force.' As a step toward devetopmen of a worldwide "community o McNamara suggested that every young person in the United two years of service, whether hi the military, the Peace Corps or "some other volunteer develop- ment work at home and abroad." CHARLEY WEST SAYS: at ON a day, See CRASH, Pg. I, CoL 4 FREDERICK C. HELM PREMIER VISITS DA NANG Anti-Ky Troops Bag U.S. Plane The plane, carrying a U.S. two miles outside die city after he was confident he would avoid taking seven hits from antigovern- a civil war by "political rattier Hardman up at die River Bend ment troops near one of die said he had been under no obll- Thomas Memorial and Young DONT H 'NMVOUJ LBJ UXOII VIET CRITICS SMT m gatkn to forewarn U.S. officials of his sunrise move of troops to Charleston hospital to Charles- widow Mrs. Ethel Hardman, 67, of 404 34di St., North Charles- ton General. James Wright, wbo was at- tendant at a service station in was in- nuns 'began a 4Wiour hunger St Albans earlier this year, Da Nang Sunday. To the sound of States should be asked to give pagodas controlled by the reb- gongs, 20 Buddhist monks and jured. strike at noon hi Saigot. to pro- said that between 6 and The rebel soldiers aimed auto- test the government's attempt to p. m. on die evening of Feb. matic weapons and rifle fire on each of die plane's two low passes over die politically divided city. There was no im- mediate explanation of the rea- son for spotter's flight which followed shortly after a Viet- namese air force plane dropped areas. U. S. Marines quietly took over a Da Nang River bridge disputed between rebel and government troops. The Marines won control negotiations. of the bridge by Their commander, W. Walt, taked marines into letting the Ameri- cans take over die west end and others negotiated a withdrawal of rebel troops holding die east end. While both rides jockeyed troops in the political power struggle, for DMrafBterr BBnVfnirtl the Buddhists said they wanted to dffl war. h drums and See PREMIER, Pg. Col. 3 Malaysia Ready For Peace Talks KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia government leaflets on die rebel ui The Malaysian cabinet an- nounced today that it is ready to open peace talks immediate- ly with Indonesia's new govern- ment. The cabinet proposed that Deputy Prime Minister Tun Ab- Gen. Lewis dul Razak meet with Indonesian Vietnamese Foreign Minister Adam "to make use of the present fa- vorable and hopeful atmos- phere. The Malaysian announcement was la response to recent Indo- nesian peace feelers and re- ap- ports from Jakarta that die gov. last amment thare was ready lor a sod PJrolfB masttax to seek ways to end die Ihreeyaar Mad Kidnaper Killed; Girl Hostage Rescued Farm Bay's Shotgun Blast Stops Sniper SHADE GAP, Pa. W A mad kidnapiiller was shot to death today in a desperate attempt to break through a police cordon with Ids 17-year-old hostage, Peggy Ann Bradnlck. William Diller Hollenbangh, 44, fen dying in a farm yard with a slug through the neck after a dash for freedom in the commandeered car of a deputy sheriff he had critically wounded. The girl Bed to the shelter of the farmhouse. She was not hurt. Jack Conmy, press secretary to Gov. Wflliam W. Scran ton, said the slug was fired from a shotgun by Larry Rubeck, 15, son of the farm owner. HoIIenbaugh, who yesterday killed a pursuing FBI agent, triggered two shots at oncoming state troopers before he collapsed, bleeding heavily. The final gunfight climaxed a massive manhunt hi the Tuscarora Mountains 70 miles southwest of Harrisburgh after HoIIenbaugh once an inmate of an asylum for the criminal Insane snatched Peggy Ann on her way home from school last Wednesday. A force of 2SO state troopers which had surrounded baugh's mountain hideout down, throughout the night began clos- er and the gm in a cabin. "Young Larry fired his shot- as another state trooper at Conmy "It is believeJ HoIIen- baugh was struck simultaneous- Conmy said HoUenbaugn shot jy by rounds from the troop- Sharp in the stomach and, push- ing the girl into the back seat of the car, forced the deputy to drive toward Highway 522, a quarter of a mile away down a nead er's gun and the shot by Larry." Conmy said he believed Hoi- lenbaugh died as he fell to the ground. He farm lane. At the Rubeck farm, HoIIen- baugh ordered the bleeding dep- uty to get out and open the gate to the highway. GIRL BREAKS AWAY Conmy said young Rubeck pointed a shotgun loaded with a slug out the window of his home and fired. As the sing spun HoI- Ienbaugh around the girl broke away and ran. A state police car pulled up and Hollenbaugh fired two shots at the oHteers. They returned the and HoDenbaugh went was pronounced at Fulton Med- in nearby McCon- ical Center neUsburg. DEPUTY OPERATED ON Deputy Sharp was taken to a hospital in Chambersburg, where he underwent surgery. His condition was described as serious. Dr. G. T. Lorentz, who exam- ined Peggy Ann at die McCon- nellsburg Medical Center, said be found no evidence that she bad been physically molested. She bore some scratches and Bas KIDNAPPER. Pg. f, Col. IN BENNETT TRIAL Woman Called Murder Plotter By JACK GREENE Of The DaHy Man Staff Two doctors, two ambulance drivers and a service station attendant today testified for the prosecution in the Intermediate Court murder trial of Mary E. Bennett Prosecutor Charles M. Walker, hi his opening statement, pic- tured her as part of a diabolical plot to kill her stepfather, Justin H. Hardman. He attributed to her the role of a prime mover in the killing of Hardman, 69, at his summer borne to the River Bend Addi- tion near St. Albans. Dr. Peter Ledewig, patholn- 10 he sow Hiss Bennett at the station. He said she was walking to- ward a telephone booth when he saw her, but he was unable to gist at Charleston General Hos- pital, and Dr. James L. Steele, wbo treated Hardman at Thomas Memorial Hospital, bodi told die jurors that multi- ple shotgun pellets were imbed- ded in the skull and brain of Hardman. Dr. Ladewig per- formed an autopsy on die Hard- man body hours after his death Feb. 1L Dr. Steele said, based on his examination of Hardman die night of Feb. 10, be expected the shotgun wounds to produce solve. death. Donald Oasdorph of St. Al- bans and James V. Young Jr. lance drivers. Casdorph picked pressure." He also summer home and took him to transported him from die South she used die tele- phone. State evidence was to contin- ue ttris afternoon. A. T. CiccareUo, counsel for Miss Bennett, 39, of North Charletson, gave no hint hi his opening statement as to what his client's defense would be. However, he did say die evi- dence would take a "surprising turn" and that the case would have a mystery that die jury of LARRY RUBECK FIRED WILLIAM D. HOLLENBAUGH Sttlsar Gnmnd Don eight men and four women must of Charleston were die ambu- one of "lying in wait, premedi- See PLOTTER, Pg. f, Col. 1 LATE BULLETINS MOSCOW W A Soviet statement holds that U. S. ah- raids on North Viet Nam are threatening forelgi freighters visiting that can- try. As diptomiti here see It, this a Soviet fear that bombs might strike Soviet ships aad caue a cosfroita- Uoa tbat waaU play mto ChJ- kaios. WASHINGTON Ml Sei. Herman E. Talmadge. D-Ga., said taday he wffl m far gareraar If the yeayle Geargla wot htm to M. He IsM mmtmtM that "I have a nochilii that I cam kast MTVC my state mi Hi asspte fhesv ttyttf USMS as gareraar. rather thn thalMM States AUSTIN, Tex. W The Texas Cant at Criminal Ap- peals unanimously ruled to- day that Jack Ruby's trial Jidge did not disqualify him- self to sit as lodge in die case when be decided to write a beak about the trial. The case goes back to DaDas far a unity bearing. WASHINGTON W) Secre- tary of Labor W. Willard Wlrti w ordering the nation's federal-state employ- ment to classify mB- of ]ab by race, It was leaned today. The par- am Is ts keep a closer check to afamate Jah atthaafh Wirii has taseeded that K easM re- tf Okavf am MM TERRY RAY AND.ERSON FBI Man Slab 1st Hot -AP Wlrapholoi HOLLENBAUGffS BODY WHEELED AWAY KUnaper-KBer Goned Dam Trying To Etade Mufcmt Walker said the state will more than bombs from prove that the death of Hard- the Navy to help carry out its man, a retired pipefitter, was air strikes in Viet Nam, it was AF Forced To Borrow Navy Bombs WASHINGTON- (AP) The than bombs of various and sizes." ton is scheduled Tuesday. Robert Lee EDard, 27, of April 30, 1966 "The Navy made 1311 Kanawha Turnpike, South Jet Tanker's Crash Kills 5 AMARILLO, Tex. W-A jet tanker dug a wing into a run- way while landing at AmtriBo Air Force Base and cartwheeled hi flames last night, all four crewmen and a passenger. The Strategic Air Command craft, a KC135 assigned to the 909th Refueling Squadron here, was returning from a four-hour local mission. They listed the crew members Capt. Thomas W Burt, 34, available to the Ajr Force "from pound sizes'. .P'lot- from Fort Worth, learned today. The great bulk of this supply was turned over to the Air Force before this year, die The Defense Department pro-spokesman said. No breakdown tated, deliberate and planned." Four persons including Miss vided this figure m response Bennett and die victim's widow questions after the bomb diver- were indicted for murder in die sion came to light hi congres- Hardman death. Trial of thesional testimony released TuerV8rted last year. Ah- strikes day. were first launched in North A' Pentagon spokesman said Nam in Febra- that between Jan. 1, 1964 and ary Charleston, pleaded guilty last Navy inventories slightly more fnanv Crippled Man Saves Boy, 2, In Fiery Home NEW CARLISLE, Ohio IB- Calvin Toler got little Thomas Toler, 2. out of his playpen, scooted him across die kitchen floor and outside to safety from their burning home here yes- terday. "I'D never be able to figure out bow he did exclaimed New Carlisle's fire chief, Lode Baker-far Calvin Toler is M years old and lame. were The Navy uses 250-and Mu- of each were CaPl- "ax J- Force received from LMe N- Y I the Air and tons of ammu- MaJ- Richard H. Doughty, 35, navigator from New York City, and T. Sgt Harry L. Alexan- nition. The disclosure that the Air Force has borrowed the der, 29, boom operator from Authorities withheld die nama of die passenger pending notifi- cation of relatives. They said ha was an Air Force man. indicate that the Air Force has! been confronted with a signifi- cant, if not serious, problem of bomb supplies in die face of in- creased war activity. Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara said tons of bombs was on inventory in Southeast Asia last month, and with tons dropped in! PAGES-1 SECTIONS March alone against Communist FIRST-General News Iforces in Viet Nam. Obituaries Editorial Today's Index McNamara has said repeated- ly that no bomb shortage has adversely affected die war ef- fort. In response to press re- ports about such gaps he told Idle Senate Foreign Relations a walker to get [Committee in April that die lUnrted States this year will drop The old man got his grand- tons of bombs 91 per He uses around. out the back door before cent of die entire tonnage! Editorials collapsing from smoke nbala- dropped hi 37 months of titt Ko- Financial dot, War. t News, Conies, Sports, Women's, Classified Page Page Bridge .....32 Obituaries 4 Classified 28 Sports .....M Comics It Sr. Forum JS Crossword 14 Theaters a BTV It   

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