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Charleston Daily Mail Newspaper Archive: February 3, 1952 - Page 1

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   Charleston Daily Mail (Newspaper) - February 3, 1952, Charleston, West Virginia                                The Weather CITY Rain today, tonight and Monday, followed by colder, STATE Mild, rain Sunday and Monday. Colder Monday night. 5 Sections General. Sports, Society, Classified, Comics "for Democracy, Decency, Dependability" ASSOCIATED PRESS WIREPHOTOS CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA, SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 3, 1952 NECKING FEATURES PICTURES VOL. 34 NEWS, TRUNK, SPORTS WIRES Morris Pledges 'No Whitewash' City Set To Welcome Taf t Monday Russian Truce 5 Demand Fails To Draw Top W.Va. Figures Rescue Workers Bring Out Mine Victim More Than Expected To Jam Auditorium Here PARIS, Feb. 2 (AP) A special United Nations committee, ignoring a Soviet declaration that "World War III has already today overwhelmingly re- jected Russia's demand for U. N. intervention in Korean truce talks. The Russian proposal was smothered 52 to S Aj A crowd wnich will western counter-plan calling for postponement ol RepubiiCan dignitaries rean debate until a truce has been it becomes from throughout necessary to extend the approved 51 to 5. Allies Seek Compromise U.N Eases'Truce Supervision Stand TOKYO, Sunday, Feb. 3 Allied staff officers today sought a compromise with the Commu nists on supervision of a armistice. Korean: The staff officers were making progress of a sort as they studied for the second time a United Na- tions draft of a plan for super- vising an armistice, but they were leaving untouched the major Is- of air fields dur- ing an armistice. The Allied officers firmly reject- ed the Communist move to draw the Iron Curtain around the Yalu River by trimming North Korean Inspection ports to three. The Reds hoped to place two observer teams on the east coast and one at Sinuiju across from Antung, Manchuria, thus cloaking some 400 miles of Manchurian border. The Reds at the same time sug- gested that neutral teams be sta- tioned on the Allied side at Pu- san, Inchon and Suwon. This brought an Allied protest that Seoul's air -fields would become useless. However the Allies agreed on a flexible radius around the ports of entry. Three points of difference faced the negotiators as they met today: 1. Troop rotation. Agreement on See ALLIES SEEK (Page 6, Column 7) Unidentified Craft The committee vote was far In excess of the two-thirds majority the western resolution will need when it comes before the full assembly. Delegates from Russia and Its satellites hurled anti-American charges during the debate which Anglo-French Aid Seen PARIS, Feb. 2 Prance and Britain have agreed they will join the United States in warning Red China against vio- lating any Korean armistice and if such a violation will join in asking the United Nations for punitive action, a highly placed informant said tonight. There was no indication of the extent of the punitive action the three powers might ask a full- scale attack, an air-sea war or more limited measures. Respon- sible authorities in Washington said three weeks ago America's allies in Korea had substantially agreed to a United States pro- posal to back up any truce pact with a warning of military ac- tion directly against.Communist China if the pact was broken. proceeded the vote. Russia's Ja- cob Malik offered atrocity cry a the only new charge thai West Virginia is expected to be present here tomorrow night to hear Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio address a Lincoln day rally in Municipal auditorium. Roy H. Pierson, chairman of the Kanawha county Republican executive committee, who Is In charge of arrangements, said yesterday that the anticipated attendance had prompted him to order some several hundred chairs placed on the vast audi- torium stage. This will increase the overall seating capacity to more than In the auditor- ium. Sen. Taft's address will begin at 8 p. in. and will last for 30 min-l utes. It will be followed by an open 'orum during which members of he audience may address ques- tions to the man many consider almost certain of the nomination for the presidency. Numerous inquiries have been received by Pierson concerning tickets, he said, and some have In- quired if there is an admission price. He said there would be no tickets and no admission and no. special seating arrangement. "It will be a case of first come, first served, with everybody wel- come and he said. See TAFT TO SPEAK (Page 6, Column 4) U. S. warplanes in Korea are us- ing "toxic' bullets. THE SOVIET delegate said American planes sprayed a "peace :ul" hamlet in Red Korea with explosive and poisonous bullets in, f a raid early this month, "heavily LOUlSVllle 1 Old wounding" five persons and poison Can Break South, ins 83 but killing none. Malik also launched the charge McGrath Held Not 'Immune' By The Associated Press Newbold Morris said tonight there would be "no whitewash" in his probe of federal corruption and that would "go to the very top if necessary." Morris, who accepted yesterday the job from Presi- .ent Truman of heading the search for wrongdoers in he federal government, said his investigation would not top short of-Attorney General J. Howard McGrath, himself, if evidence warranted it.______________ Freight Jams Truck Depots Rescue workers carry out the first body of six miners who were killed Saturday ki a pre-dawn explosion 300 feet under- ground at the Carpentertown No. 2-mine of the Carpenter- town Coal and Coke Co. near Greensburg, Pa. The blast also injured four others, three of them seriously.' that the third world war already islpredicted here Saturday that ne'0f American and Ali being fought. could break the "solid in.strategy in that part of Formosan Forces Feared Crumbling WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 China's neutralized forces on the island of Formosa are rapidly nearing the point of deterioration, according to reports received by the state and defense departments. Carey Enters Sheriff Race With this and other problems In mind some officials responsible LOUISVILLE, Ky., Feb. 2 Far Eastern policies are trying Robert A. Taft obtain top level reconsideration the world. purpose is to see whether nations cannot switch JoQtmllv defensive stratesv a basically efensive strategy V.N. Troops SEOUL, Korea, Sunday. Feb. 3 a presidential campaign against Their Concrete evidence has b e e id t Truman. produced here about the Anglo- American bloc's preparations for a1 "I believe that I could carry third world he said. "This five southern states against fynairnc po toes which third world war has in fact begun.! man _ the five that President would put the Chinese Reds more The war is being waged in Korea (Hoover carried in Taft said on reDorted to have rhino m Mniovo KcrvntW o rnnference. He namr.dl This question is reponeaio nave China, in Malaya, Tunisia and Morocco." (KOREA and Malaya are unidentified planes bombed ters of communist aggression.1 and strafed Allied troops on the There have been strong hints that Central Korean Front Saturday. communist influence lay behind A U S Fifth Air Force spokes-1 See VOTE SMOTHERS man said' Saturday he didn't have] (Page 6, Column 1) "anything to say one way or an- other" whether the planes were! Communist. If they were, it was the largest number of Red air-i craft to attack Allied ground troops thus far in the Korean War. I battlefront otherwise was quiet Saturday, except for brief pa- trol contacts. In Northwest Koreai r-86 Sabre jet pilots reported three See PLANES ATTACK (Page 6, Column 1) a news conference. He named I I the five as Virginia, North lina, Florida, Texas and cen- -p., imander see. into conferences held by Radford, com- of the Pacific 6 Miners Die In Pa. Blast "There will be no he said. "That would imply that I had discovered something wrong and then repressed it. is a fighting word to me." Morris said: "If there's misconduct anywhere, t's the top official who is re- sponsible. When there was a war n Europe, Gen. Eisenhower got he credit for winning. If we had .ost, he would have got the blame." MORRIS was asked if that meant McGrath would be blamed if cor- ruption were discovered m the de- f justice. Communities Left Without Service (Combined from AP and UP Wlrei) A management representa- tive said Saturday the strike of AFL truck drivers has left 000 southern communities with- adding: Mr. McGrath, himself t o 1 d out freight service, me to let the chips fall where, they may." I in Washington Sen. Nixon (R-Calif) today assailed the selec- tion of Newbold Morris to head the search for wrong-doers in the government as "a complete phony Freight jammed truck termi- nals in scores of cities in the 11-state strike by about long-haul truck drivers. In its second day, the walkout's impact already was being felt at the consumer level in many cities and towns. IN TEXAS alone, truck line op- Four Injured Saved; Methane Gas Blamed i OREENSBURG, Pa., Feb. 2 Payment." Six miners were killed and four injured today in an explosion which Operators Warned WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 The bureau of mines warned op- erators three times in 1951 that the Carpentertown, Pa., mine where six men w ere killed today, was "gassy" and danger- ous, Secretary of the Interior Oscar L. Chapman said. Chapman issued a formal statement saying the Pennsyl- vania tragedy "emphasizes anew the urgent need for a revision of federal mine safety laws such as is now under consideration by the congress." by the White House." "Morris took over with a state- ment praising Atty. Gen. McGrath. issued efore he had even started erators communities his Nixon told a dependent entirely on trucks porter, "and theey prejudiced; for freight, himself in any investigation Another j 000 communlties, they McGrath. depend solely on trucks in "Yet he says he is going to start Arkansas anc. Loulsl. out investigating the Jjstic-e Other states hit by the strike were Tennessee, Kentucky, Mis- sissippi, Alabama, Georgia, Flor- ida and Ohio. AT CHICAGO, Federal Concili- ator William Murray reported that settlements had been reached cov- ering thousands of over-the-road drivers in all midwestern states except Ohio. WASHINGTON, Feh. 2 Wl-The He said at Cnicago te possibility arose today that the Qhjo walkout had been bold Morris, the administration s u d ff but probabiy be new No. 1 anti-corruption investi- gator, may himself come under public scrutiny by a Senate corn- See McGRATH INCLUDED (Page 6, Column Morris May Face Ships Deal Quiz Taft said prospects for Republi- See CAN BREAK SOUTH (Page 6, Column 3) Presidential Aspirant Lincoln Speaker Daily Almanac THE GROUNDHOG took his place in the sun today. At least he took a place where the sun should have been. But Walter Wolfe, air- port meteorologist, said only a few beams burst through a heavy over- cast and that even fewer shadows were seen. So, according to the old belief, the remainder of winter should be mild as the little wood chuck himself. Son and Moon 12-Hour Range Ended 6 p. m. Barometer Reading p. m......... 28.90 falling Kanawha Airport 1 m m m a. m p. m p. m p. m p. m 50 p. m. 49 p. m. 51 p. m. 50 p. m. 50j p. m. 51 p. m. p. m. p. m. i. Feet, when lie was here last week. It may be taken up when MaJ. Gen. William Chase, mission chief on Formosa, comes here next week for talks with Pentagon and State Department officials. CITES POLICY NEED John Foster Dulles, Republican adviser in the State department, told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee recently in testifying See FORMOSA PLIGHT (Page 6, Column 3) G.O.P. Nomination Sought By Sign Man Al Carey, widely-known business- man of Charleston for the last 30 M- years, has filed certificate of one section of didacy on the Republican ticket the heart of Western for sheriff of Kanawha county. Carey Is 51, head of the Carey System, outdoor advertising resumed in Ohio. Officials of the striking AFL Teamsters' union said individual mmee- agreements had been reached The name of Morris, New York wjth per cent.. tne Onlo attorney appointed by Atty. Gen. But at Columbus. O., McGrath yesterday as head of the j James Rjley spokesman for the Idrlve to search out wrong-doers in ohjo operatorSf said that "less See MORRIS MAY FACE (Page 6, Column 8) a mine In Pennsylva- nia's soft coal fields. Sixty-five men were in the mine, 300 feet undergound when the ex- pjml Better Help plosion occurred. t Although choking gas and debris por AllV Position handicapped the efforts of some. J of the men they scrambled to safe-i Have a help problem, not before rescuing the housekeeper, waitress, four injured. Three of those hurt or truck driver. These were hospitalized. other than 10 firms have signed." TRUCK OWNERS scheduled meeting at Columbus for Sunday afternoon to "discuss the whole Rilcy said. Despite the fact that a general trucking walkout had been avert- ed in the Midwest, a wildcat walk- cut of about loading dock many hands in Chicago disrupted many v rav midwestern shipments. About 75 per cent of all truck Need a I NO FIRE company, has ever Britain Hands Egypt Terms i LONDON, Feb. 2 Revealed today that she has told the new Egyptian government (what steps should be taken to clear the way for another attempt to Foreigners Calmed CAIRO, Ezypt, Feb. 2 Foreigners in Egypt were reas- sured tonight by Egypt's new Permier Aly Maher Pasha that the government will "spare no effort to insure their security and protect their interests and liberties." The assurance was given fol- lowing the first meeting of Ma- her's new cabinet and just one week after the city was swept by bloody riots and incendiary fires. The government announced the arrest today of Ahmed Hus- sein, extreme Socialist leader, and said he was being ques- tioned about the riots. Incumbent Judge Julian F. ;endj__ settle the bitter dispute over con- chelle, also a Democrat, said Richard E. Maize, veteran Penn- through the HELP in Chicago, isylVania secretary of mines, of the Daily Ma1. These B trucking terminal. isonallv directed rescue operations. How cost ads really (ill the bill m J d After a quick examination, he good! selection of had the pre-dawn blast apparently was; Phcants so >ou can make a Slmday_ howeveri and umon caused by methane gas. choice. j officials predicted that members Competent ad-takers are on duty wouid approve settlement terms Monday through Saturday from ;and encl the wildcat strike. Maize declared, however, that no a. m. to p. m. to assist gas had been reported in the mine'you in writing your ad. Phone for 10 years and that no electrical i 6-0311 and just say "Charge It. equipment was believed in opera-! rjariiel Boone, Service Sta- tion when the explosion occurred.'tion founcj a Wash man on the fjr.st Ha added: tnejr Daily Mail ad appeared. JUST BANG See TRUCKING TIEUP 'Pagfc 6, Column 7) What's Inside ut_; Tiller's Market filled their posi-' AL CAREY It Is the first time he sought public office. 'lust one big bang and a lot dust." ;f'rst In Washington, Sen. Humphrey cants who applied. chairman of a Senate' TO FIND BETTER HELP subcommittee on labor and labor-j phone 6-0311 i management relations, sent com-! mittee investigators Curtis Johnson; -T.I Daily Mail See 6 MINEP.S DIE I (Page 6, Column 4) I The Paper With The Want Ada He has been identified with com- munity activitied for many years. He served for years as a member of the advisory board of Boys Farm, is a member o fthe board of the Salvation Army, is a mem- ber of the city planning com- mission; member of the Kiwanis club and is a member also of! WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 Truman promised Masonic bodies Democrats Saturday that he will be a front-line fighter 1952 presidential election campaign. t He didn't say, however, wheth- IN ANNOUNCING candidacy for er he will be in there pitching a< Circuit Judge, Pros, Atty. .Frank j a candidate for re-election or as L. Taylor, who will run against the head of the party de- administration he has headed for the last seven yean. SECTION I (I'aKes 1 through Of All Roving the Valley Editorials Point of View 10) Truman Pledges Major Role In Democratic Campaigning Her St., is sons. ing the start of a party newspaper, the Democrat, for the duration of the campaign. U. S. SENATOR.ROBERT A. TAFT .1 trol of the Suez canal zone. he filed "after most careful con- This, It was revealed, represents sideration of all factors involved." "I am talcing this step humbly, See CAREt ENTERS a first step towards reopening ne- See BRITAIN HANDS (Page 6, Column 2) (Page 6, Column 8) Anticipating that the Republi- cans will have "unlimited funds" jto spend on an effort to "confuse and mislead" the people, the Presi- Mr. Truman made his pledge in said: letter to Democratic National Chairman Frank E. McKinney bail- See TRUMAN PLEDGES (Page 6, Column 7) 7 8 8 Deaths and Funerals 6 SECTION II (Pages 11 through 20) Sports New s................ It Warming L'p It Flashback 11 Outdoor 15 Schools and Colleges 37 Forrest Hull Feature....... 18 Hal Boyle 18 In Years Gone By 20 SECTION IH (Pages 21 through 30) Society News 21 Club Calendar 22 Very Small Talk 25 Talk About Teens 27 SECTION IV (Pages 31 through 40) City, State News............ 31 Theaters 32 Walter Wincheli............33 Radio and TV 33 Classified ArfJ ..............35   

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