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Bluefield Daily Telegraph Newspaper Archive: January 2, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Bluefield Daily Telegraph

Location: Bluefield, West Virginia

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   Bluefield Daily Telegraph (Newspaper) - January 2, 1938, Bluefield, West Virginia                                READ Paul Mallon's column In The Telegraph Dally, Volume XLIV. No. 314. I WEATHER WE8T VIRGINIA: Generally fair 8unday and Monday except pot-tlbly light mow flurries in north east and evtreine north portion* Sunday. Colder and Sunday night. V----� Bluefield, W. Va., Sunday Morning, Jan. 2, 1938. pM>=~ Price, Five Cents Interest Keen In FDR's Message To Congress Monday PRESIDENT TO GO1 f BEFORE SOLONS Tax Relief, Anti-Trust Laws Will Get Emphasis FOREIGN POLICY EYED Regular Session Convenes Tomorrow^. With Important * Problems To Be Solved Washington, Jan. 1. (AP)- President Roosevelt worked today on an annual message to congress which seemed likely to bear down heavily upon the notes of tax relief, budget balancing and stronger anti-trust laws. The chief executive discussed the general legislative situation at a "pot luck" luncheon with Speaker Bankhead at which arrangements were completed tor Mr. Roosevelt to deliver the message perosnally to congress Monday. No Limits Yet 1 Although Bankhead said he talked of numerous subjects with the president "up and down the lirie," the Alabaman gave no hint of what new legislative proposals, if any, the message would contain. However, blistering attacks of big business and monopolistic practices earlier this week by two administration stalwarts, Secretary Ickes and Robert H. Jackson, assis-tant attorney-general, inspired widespread belief that the president would have considerable to say to congress along- this line. Senator Borah (R-Irado) Arch Foe of Monopoly, said "action" was needed to meet the problem/adding "it Is time to legislate." Demands for revision of the corporate tax structure, particularly the undistributed profits and capital gains Jevies, reached a crescendo during.the recent special session .and admisitration leaders have indicated compliance will be one of the major tasks of the regular session. A special house tax subcommittee has been working for weeks on a bill to effect the changes. Move For Defense Bankhead told newsmen there was a disposition In congress to "economize as much as possible" but that the troubled international situation "might make some difference" in appropriations for national defense. The president already has Informed congress that world events which were causing him "concern" might Impel him to recommend a naval construction program which would substantially exceed one on Which a house appropriations subcommittee has been working for weeks. This would provide for construction of 18 new warships and would increase the naval appropriation bill $50,000,000 beyond, the current $516,000,000 figure. Uncertainty over the probable effect of the current economic setback on government revenues and relief needs added to the task of the president and his aides in charting the financial course of the government. In suggesting curtailment of federal highway expenditures recently, the president told congressional Democrats that, because of their huge majority, they would have to assume full responsibility for ,i,y expenditiures in excess of his reconnendations. A note of opposition to any attempt to reduce relief expenditures (Turn to Page Four) Girl, 15, Walks Again After 2 Years Of Helplessness, Charleston, W. Va.. Jan. 1. UP)- Fifteen-year-old Betty Jean Boggs celebrated New Year's day by walking around the garage while her father greased the car, and then went to a movie. That isn't anything unusual for the ordinary girl, but to Betty Jean they are still thrilling experiences -She is able to walk' normally again after two years and four months of lyinR face down. Even more exciting is the prospect of returning to school this month after an absence of three years. Because she studied while she was in bed. she doesn't expect to lose more than a year. Betty Jean suffered deep burns on her back from her neck to her heels. January 4, 1935, when her pajamas and bathrobe caught fire from a gas stove. Physicians despaired of her life but managed to save her with seven blood transfusions. Her mother. Mrs. N. D, Boggs. commenting on Betty Jean's slow recovery, said: "She even had to learn how to eat sitting up all over again, she was so accustomed to eating while lying on her stomach. She added her daughter is expected to be "as good as new" in time, although one burn still is not healed. " Betty Jean spent the weary months in bed knitting, writing and reading letters from correspondents in 23 states and a Presbyterian missionary in Africa, and re-re-reading a letter from President Roosevelt. \ �-t "She's trying to make up 'for lost time now." Mrs. Boggs laughed happily. "Nobody can leave the house unless Betty Jean goes along. "But that's just all right with us." IN SHANTUNG AREA Converge On Yenchow In Effort To Get Control Of Important Railway YENCHOW'S FALL WOULD CUT OFF FOES' ESCAPE Loyalists Hold Teruel Against Rebels In One Of War's Worst Battles Insurgent Efforts To Reoccupy City Said To Have Been Beaten Back; Rebels, However, Claim They Dominate City s T AS Hll. 11 L Nippon's Forces Move To Complete Conquest; Extensive Bombing , Operations Carried On By Jap Planes In Taishan And Suchow Declares He Will Support FDR Plea For Road Cut SAYS DEFICIT WILL GROW Presidential Declaration On International Affairs Will Be Broadcast To Every Point Of War-Torn Globe By JOHN LEAR Associated Press Staff Writer President Roosevelt's message to the opening session of. the 78th congress on Monday will be hammered home to a war-worried world as the words of no other president have been. Whatever he has to. say about America's views on international affairs will go to every nook and comer of the globe in a record-breaking radio broadcast. Without knowing what the president planned to include in his speech, acting only on the assump tlon that something of worldwide importance was bound to follow recent   white   pronouncements   on world rearmament and the Japanese situation, the National Broadcasting company began Fri day to send out short wave mes sages informing the peoples of the world "hat they could hear the president. In. 10 separate broadcasts, in (even different languages, linguists drummed up an audience over the New Year's week-end with announcements of when and where to listen. By Monday noon, the broadcasters were confident, the world in general would be tuned in. The International hook-up was bo arranged that when President Roosevelt began his message In Washington about l p.m. (eastern standard tunc) his words would go .(Turn to Page Four). Avers Spending For Prosperity 'Myth' Has Been Exploded By U.S. Experience Washington. Jan. 1. (/P)-Senator Harry F. Byrd fD-Va) coupled a statement today that he would support President Roosevelt's proposed reduction, in the-federal appropriation for roads with a demand that at the same time "the extravagances and luxuries of government get the ax, and by a major operation." Since July 1, he said, the federal government had spent $300,000,000 more than in the same period of last year, exnlnding "the myth of spending ourselves into prosperity. limes Are Worse "We are spending as much or more than ever, and times are getting worse." he said. "Our revenue will not reach the estimates because of the business recession. I predict that the deficit for the fiscal year, 1938. will be more than double the estimate made. "The crisis is great, and drastic and determined action is necessary to avoid a huge increase in general taxation, because our financial solvency demands that the budget be balanced soon." Senator Byrd said he not only would support the proposed reduction in federal road funds but would support "any other expenditure reduction program he (the president) proposes." "I am confident," he said, "that those in the senate with whom I have been cooperating for four years in support of a balanced budget will do likewise, as we recog-(Turn to Page Four) (By The Associated Press) Shanghai, Jan. 2.-(Sunday) -Two Japanese columns moving rapidly southward to complete the conquest of Shantung province today were converging-on Yenchow, important railway junction near the province's southern border. Japanese dispatches' said the two clumns, skirting a Chinese resistance center around Taishan, the sacred mountain, already had captured Pingyin and Feicheng, west of the Tientsin-Pukow railway, which marks the main line of the Japanese advance.' Would Bar Escape Capture of Yenchow, it was believed, would cut off escape for the Chinese forces still battling the invaders around Taishan and the nearby city of Taian. Yenchow is 70 miles south of Tslnan, the captured provincial capital, and about 100 miles north of Suchow, junction of the Tientsin-Pukow and Lunghai railways, the latter being the main east-west trunk line of China. The Chinese at Taishan were reported led bv the famous "Christian general," Feng Yu-Hsiang, long among the most bitterly anti-Japanese of China's military men. Japanese airplanes were said to have dropped more than 700 bombs in the Taishan area, destroying or damaging many of the famous temples that crown the mountain i or nestle on its slopes. Suchow also I has been heavily bombed by the Japanese airforces. Two hundred Chinese civilians were Reported killed or wounded in the raids. The Shanghai municipal, council, ruling the International 'Settlement, took stern measures to cope with terrorism following Saturday's bombing in which four Japanese soldiers were wounded. Five grenades were thrown at the group by unidentified persons, probably from a Chinese hotel at a busy settlement corner. Several Chinese pedestrians including a woman, also were wounded. To Search For Arms The council gave the police sweeping authority to search public or private property for unauthorized arms, threatening to expel from the settlement anyone committing armed crime and offering rewards up to $1,500 to anyone supplying information leading to the arrest of terrorists or seizure of unauthorized arms. Settlement authorities, American and Briton, hoped to prevent development of a terroristic campaign against Japan's domination of the Shanghai area. Friday Lo Pah-Hong, eminent Chinese Catholic layman and philanthropist, was assassinated in the French concession shortly after he assumed leadership of a Chinese committee co operating with the Japanese in restoring normal conditions here. Tsingtao, the Shanghai port to ward which a Japanese army is driving from the west, was quiet. A public safety commission having restored order after two weeks of destruction and looting of Japan ese property by Chinese forces, which departed Friday. 182 Remain One hundred eighty-two Ameri cans remained in Tsingtao and its vicinity, and Samuel Sokobin, the United States consul, reported all safe and all American property undamaged. The destroyer Pope arrived at Shanghai from Tsingtao, bringing five children of American residents of the Shantung port. About 70 Americans have left Tsingtao since Chinese began burning Japanese cotton mills and the Japanese invasion of Shantung began in earnest. Canton Bombed Hongkong   dispatches   reported Japanese airplanes heavily bombed (Turn to Page Four) Madrid, Jan. 1. (fP)-A government war communique late tonight declared government troops still held blizzard-slashed Teruel where Insurgent attempts to reoccupy the strategic city were said to have been beaten back. Terrific pressure from Insurgent planes and artillery forced the government to give ground, the announcement said, but later one position was recovered. (Dispatches to the French frontier said the Insurgents were celebrating recapture of Teruel, object surprise government offensive two of bitter winter fighting since a weeks ago. Insurgents reported they dominated the city completely.) The communique said mechanized Insurgent columns, assisted by great masses of aviation and artillery, moved at dawn across the snowbanked plains outside Teruel forcing government forces to give ground. Two powerful Insurgent attacks captured one strategic hill, but the communique said government troops regained it later. The battle, one of the greatest of the civil war, raged in heavy winter weather that Impeded all operations in deep snow. Troops of both armies suffered from the cold, and communications virtually were at a stand-still around the contested city, 135 miles east of Madrid. Madrilenos celebrated New Year's day by receiving the gift of 100 grams of sugar (about 3.5 ounces) and the right to purchase one egg each with their dally food rations. The heaviest snow in seven years blocked street car traffic and blanketed the gaping shell holes in downtown buildings. Many citizens suffered from the cold since Madrll-eons were foraed to surrender all blankets except two apiece last fall for the use of soldiers. Barcelona dispatches said a terrific snowstorm handicapped gov ernment efforts to send supplies and reinforcements to halt the Insurgent counter-offensive. Forty armored cars, three big guns and over 100 trucks were stalled In snow dlfts waiting better weather. Communiques declared govern-(Turn to Page Four) Golden Bears Beat Tide 13-0; Mountaineers Get 7-6 Victory Over Texas Tech BOWL GAMES RING DOWN CURTAIN ON GRID GAMES East-West Qridders Tie At O-O; Santa Clara Trounces L.S.U. 6-0 In Sugar Bowl Bice Takes Colorado 28-14 And Auburn Beats Michigan (Complete stories on the bowl football games will be found in the sport section of tills edition.) 10 Million Jobless In V. 5. Indicated In National Count FIRST "FIGURES OF CEKOSJPO 7,822,912 Report Themselves As Unemployed Man WinsLiar Crown With Story About Wife's Inertia IDDEDJEMHEHS Intensive Drive To Enlarge Trade Body Planned TO PUBLICIZE BLUEFIELD Additional Revenue Will Be Put Into Effort To Advertise City ICG TO RESUME COALJATE CASE Operators Seeking Lower Rail Rate To Hampton Roads MARKETS   ENDANGERED The, chamber of commerce's carefully-planned campaign to raise a sizeable fund to publicize Greater Bluefield will start this week. Every cent of money raised by en- larging the membership of the trade Virginia, Virginia and Eastern Ken- Present Charges Favor All-Bail .Shipping To Eastern Markets, Is Claimed Washington, Jan. 1. (JP)-The Interstate commerce commission will resume Wednesday consideration of a complaint agaiflst rail rates on bituminous coal from points in West body will be spent to advertise Blue field's attractions from two stand-points-ras' avietaH center and as an ideal place In which to live and lear a family. Three media will be used-a dally radio program, an attractive booklet and space in out-of-town newspapers. It is the most ambitious community-advertising program Blue-field has ever attempted, G. L. Furr, chamber president, said. It is believed that the program will mean thousands of dollars In new business for Bluefield and many new residents, particularly from the coalfields. "This canvass for new members to raise funds to publicize Blue-field. W. Va.-Va., is not a charitable campaign but an emest effort to enlist new recruits i"� the chamber of commerce which' has for its sole purpose the promotion of the city's business and commercial welfare," Edward Steel, secretary-manager said. "We are not going out to solicit funds for the promotion of the interest of any one group no matter how worthy; our purpose is one dedicated to the advancement of Greater Bluefield's prosperity-the prosperity of every man and woman earning his or her livelihood in the city. "We have no apologies to make; our approach to the person who is not a member of the chamber is in the nature of presenting an offer to assist in a worthy undertaking-an endeavor which yields a return to every individual earning his livelihood in Bluefield. "the secretary concluded. In the last month the chamber's membership has been increased 60 per cent, thus assurinj sufficient revenue to take care of all of its other activities except the proposed advertising campaign. Miss Martha Jane Williams of the WHIS staff has been loaned to the chamber of commerce to assist with the drive. She will work under the direction of chamber officials in obtaining the new members. Still 1937 As French Deputies Wrestle With Budget Figures Nation Counts 164 New Year Dead; W. Va. Road Toll Drops Autos Take Highest Toll As Celebrants Greet 1938; State Has 9 Percent Decrease In Auto Deaths, With None Reported For New^Year's Day By The Associated Press At least 164 persons died with the old year in the United States. Automobiles skidding and careening on damp and ice-sheated streets took the heaviest toll, accounting for 137 of the fatalities reported from 32 states. �West Virginia's constabulary wiped the slate clean Saturday after a year which brought a 9 per cent decrease in highway fatalities, and looked hopefully for a larger reduction in 1938. Sergeant W. B. Tyree, statistician for the department of public safety, announced 465 persons were killed in 1937 automobile accidents as compared with 503 the previous vear. Kanawha was outstanding among counties, Tyree said, with a decrease of 16 per cent over 1936. The 1937 death toll In the county from highway mishaps was 54. While the state recovered from New Year's celebrations, the police department credited to a vigilant campaign by West Virginia, county and local officers against drunken driving the failure to receive, a report of a single fatal accident. Twelve were killed over the Christmas week-end. Superintendent C. C. Tallman had appealed to celebrants to stay from behind steering wheels after drinking and police visited night clubs and dance halls at intervals to remind crowds of the warning. Lewisburg, in Greenbrier county, celebrated the New Year today (Saturday) with the traditional "Shanghai" parade. A steady rain failed to dampen enthusiasm of participants in the 78th annual event Celebrants throughout the state awoke to find similar weather. Uain fell in several sections and cloudy skies augured anything but aa (Turn to Page Tour). Paris, Jan. 1 (/P)-It still was officially 1937 today in the French parliament, whose two chambers were wrestling with the 1938 budget. Clocks were stopped 10 minutes before last midnight and the shuttling of the budget bill between the chamber of deputies and the senate continued. Late today the chamber finished the third reading and sent the budget to the senate. This showed an anticipated deficit of nearly 400,000,000 francs ($13,350,000). France's dangerous strike situation remained unchanged, with arbitrators and union leaders alike celebrating the New Year. There remained, however, several points of dispute between unions and employers upon which may hinge the question of whether the pro-labor Communist party will continue to support the people's front govern-nietn. tucky to Hampton Roads ports, for trans-shipment outside the Virginia capes. The complaint, filed with the commission early In the year, said the rates were unreasonable and in violation of the interstate commerce act. Hearings were begun in June, and continued until Wednesday. Rates Protected The rates are $2.52 per gross ton from the Pocahontas, New River, Winding Gulf and Greenbrier districts: $2.62 from Kenover-Thacker Kanawha and Logan districts: $2.75 from the big Sandy-Elkhorn district to Hampton Roads ports for trans-shipment and a five cent dumping charge. The complaint charged the Hampton Roads trans-shippers were "hampered, handicapped and prejudiced in meeting various forms of competition by excessive and unreasonable rates and charges; that they have lost a large tonnage for New England consumers by reason of maintenance of excessive and unreasonable rates and charges to Hampton Roads as compared to pll-rail rates maintained by the Pennsylvania railroad nad the New York Central railroad and their connections." The complaint was filed in the name of the property owners committee, composed of representatives of the Big Sandy-Elkhorn, Greenbrier, Kanawha. Logan, New. River, Williamson, Pocahontas, and Winding Gulf Operators associations. N. & W. Cited Defendants cited were the Chesapeake and Ohio, the Norfolk and Western, the Virginian, the Campbell's Creek, the Kanawha Central, the Kanawha, Glen Jean and Eastern, the Kellv's Creek and Northwestern, the Kelly's Creek, the New York Central, the Nicholas. Fayette and Greenbrier, and the Wlnifrede railroads. i Numerous leaves to Intervene In the case were granted by the commission. They included the New England Paper and Pulp Traffic association; the Port of Philadel-nhia Ocean Traffic bureau: the Boston Chamber of Commerce: the Portland, Me., chamber of commerce and the Maine Traffic association: Associated Industries of Maine: the Maine State chamber of commerce: numerous eastern railroads: the New England Traffic lea sue: the Pennsylvania Public utilities commission: Manufacturers Association of Connecticut: Associated Industries of Massachusetts: Western Pennsylvania Coal Traffic bureau and the Eastern Bituminous Coal association and the New Bedford board of commerce. (By The Associated Press) California's battering Bears and All-America Whizzer White lived up to all advance notices today as the one exploded the Alabama Rose Bowl myth sky high and the other fought his heart out in a losing cause in headline attractions of the annual New Year's day football bowl festivities. West Virginia university's Mountaineers held a one point lead for nearly three periods to defeat the Texas Tech Red Raiders by a 7-6 score in the Sun Bowl at El Pasco, Texas. 13,000 people saw the northerns outpassed and out-gained in their first invasion of the bowl yet emerge victorious. More than 262,000 fans turned out for the six games on the holiday card from coast to coast. Some 90,000 of them watched Stub Allison's "Wonder Team" hang a 13-0 beating on Alabama, thereby turning back the Crimson Tide for the first time in five Rose Bowl assignments. Fumble Beat Alabama By the simple means of taking advantage of Alabama fumbles, ripping the 'Bama line apart, and pouring their bruising backs, particularly Vic Bottarl and Sam Chapman, through the resulting holes, the Bears bulled over a touchdown each in the second and thlr periods to win. For individual achievement, however, the Cotton Bowl and its Rice-Colorado clash was the thriller for the day. White, leading the underdog Coloradans, astonished 37,000 fans by personally taking charge of two first-quarter touchdown drives to send the Rocky Mountain champions away to a flying 14-0 lead. That's where sophomore Ernie Lain, who turned out to be a whole lot of ball-player, entered the picture, and when he came in, Colorado's chances went out. Ernie scored one touchdown himself and passed for the other three as Rice shoved over three ttallies in a big second quarter, added another in the third, and waltzed In with a 28-14 decision over the Buffalo Brigade that had gone through its regular season unbeaten and untied. Santa Clara Upset L. S. V. Upsetters of the day were the Bucking Broncos of Santa Clara, who again whipped the stripes off Louisiana State's Bayou Tigers by opening a whole bag of tricks for a 6-0 victory in a repeat performance of last year's Sugar Bowl tilt. About 45,000 fans turned out for this year's showing. The picked teams of east and west, performing before 59,000 spectators at San Francisco, tussled all over the field, but wound up just where they started in a scoreless tie.  Auburn's second team shoved over a touchdown In the second quarter and topped Michigan State 6-0 before 18.700 in the Orange Bowl game at Miami. Chicago, Jan. 1   The accoslatlou is madi&up or'Sft salemen.  Harry  Cheatham, - and; Ben H>WUUams,.both of Blu^ttsM/ are on its governing board.     '''  This year the Blueileld chamber ot commerce Mi cooperating with the exhibit. This week it mailed out more than 700 letters to store pm* pie, inviting them to' the 87th buyers' week, hem* 3874 ?574 8?74   

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