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Bluefield Daily Telegraph Newspaper Archive: February 16, 1937 - Page 1

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Publication: Bluefield Daily Telegraph

Location: Bluefield, West Virginia

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   Bluefield Daily Telegraph (Newspaper) - February 16, 1937, Bluefield, West Virginia                                Pictorial Reporting.... The Dally Telegraph has recently established an art department and Is prepared to do enflraving, make drawlnfls, produce halftones and line cuts, and execute all kinds of pictorial and Illustrated prlnt-_   ino and reportlnfl. Volume XHV. No. 32. WEATHER WEST VIROINIA: Light rain changing to snow and colder Tuesday. Wednesday fair. Bluefield, W. Va., Tuesday Morning, Feb. 16, 1937. -Twelve Pages DEIIDLIMES SET  II Degree Slaying Figures Oil TO ISOLIITE " SPilSUOIlFLlGT Protests Of Major Powers Force Showdown On Outside Aid In Civil War BAN ON VOLUNTEERS MUST BE EFFECTIVE BY FEB. 20 Neutral Observers And Neutral Blockade Must Be Brought Into Operation By March 6, Group Decides; Ratification Expected Tod'ay (By The Associated Press) London, Feb. 15. (^P)-Representatives of Europe's major powers tonight set two deadlines in their drive to isolate the Spanish civil war in Spain. Sitting as a sub-committe of the International "hands-off-S pain" committee, they decided: 1. The ban on the flow of foreign volunteers to Spain must be made effective at midnight Saturday, Feb. 20; 2. Plans for complete isolation of the war, including the stationing of neutral observers and a naval blockade, must be perfected by the same time and bust be brought into operation by midnight, March 6. Will Not Meet Today Tlie full non-intervention com-mitee was called to meet at 3:30 p. m. tomorrow to ratify the decisions. The sub-committee, composed of representatives of Great Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Russia and Portugal, acted in f&ce of Por,-tugaVs continued refusal to cooperate In the complete control plan. Portugal's delegate said he awaited a decision by his government, which has turned a deaf ear to the plan thus far. Informed sources asserted there was little doubt the full committee would ratify the sub-committee's decision at a meeting tomorrow. The naval patrol program resulted from refusal of both the Valencia government and the insurgent administration to permit neutral observers to be stationed on their territory. Would Report Movements The ships, while having no authority to stop and search suspected vessels, would report their move-mentis to the international !om-mittee and goyernments would be asked to -A'nalize the owners. Ships e� route to Spain would be compelled to stop at certain ports where committee representatives would examine them to ascertain that they contained neither war materials nor volunteers. French Premier Leon Blum's belligerent stand regarding Italian aid to the Spanish insurgents was believed to have influenced the sub-commltee to take serious action. Two British destroyers flred on an airplane, "believed to be an in-surent Spanish plane," which attempted to bomb them off the (Turn 'to Pass Ten) tlCE SEEK N Honolulu Naval Lieutenant's Wife Charges Unidentified Man Attacked Her; Physician Disclaims Story Honolulu, Feb. 15. (/P)-A. reported criminal attack upon a naval lieutenant's wife sent police hunting tonight for an unidentified white man who dropped an initialed hankerchlef in the garage where she said she was assaulted. A doctor who examined slight 24-year-old Mrs. Bennett S. Copping said ;she had not been attacked. Mrs. Copping told Police Captain Don Hays she was seized early today in her residential apartment building when she stepped outside her room, was dragged 75 feet across an open yard and Into the garage. The woman, whose husband is attached to, the submarine S28, was questioned by officers and underwent two examinations. Dr. Henry M. Akina, assistant city-county physician, said he found no evidence Mrs. Copping had been harmed and that he would not testify in support of an attack charge. Police found a man's handkerchief In the garage bearing the Initial "H." The handkerchief was believed to have navy laundry marks. Police said they ordered laboratory tests. Lieut. Copping refused to comment when asked for a statement as he left the police station after questioning. Hays, said Mrs. Copplng's throat, lower arms and feet were brutsdS, but there was no dirt on the house coftt she wore. The yard was sUghtly disturbed, he added. Hays said Mrs. Copping returned to her room about 5:15 a.m. and told Copping she had been attacked. He at first disbelieved her, but later called police. She said a gag prevented her screaming. Hays said police had been Investigating a series of parties in the apartment building. An attack upon a naval officer's wife in 1931 led to the famous Massle case in which Lieut. Thomas H. Massle, his mother-ln-iaw. Mrs. Granville Portescue, and two naval enlisted men, were tried for murder In the death of one of five youths charged with attacking Mrs. MaHsie. The four were convicted of manslaughter, but sentences were commuted. Violent death at the hands of officials in a 'third degree' proceeding on the stabbing of a county detective was the fate of Frank C. Monaghan, 64, right above, the state contends in the trial of Stacey Gunderman, state trooper, left. Gunderman is the first on trial of seven indicted on first degree murder charges In Monaghan's death. TESTIFf lifiil iTH POL 1 JL Reporter Tells Of Hearing Alleged Victim Of Third Degree Beg Captors To Give Him A Chance Somerset, Pa., Feb. 14. (^)-A Uniontown newspaper reporter testified today he heard Frank C. Monaghan plead "give me a chance," in Fayette county dectec-tive' bertlllon room the morning of Sept. 12. The commonwealth called the reporter, Joe Dickson, as a witness against State Policeman Stacey Gunderman, charged with murder for what It calls the "third degree" death of the 64-year-old Union-town hotel man.  He testified: "I heard 'my God, don't do that, I can't stand that. Give me a chance.' You didn't give Wall a chance." Noises sounded as tough blows were being struck, and grunts, groans and repeated pleas, of, 'don't put me under there. I can't stand it.'" Sought Confession This, the commonwealth charges, was one of the scenes enacted in the room In what Attorney General Charles J. Margiotti contends was the ''deliberate beating to death" of the prisoner to make him confess cutting Detective John C. Wall a few hours before. Dickson testified District Attorney James A. Reilly, Assistant County Dectective Wilbert Mlnerd and Jack Hann, a former detective, all indicted for murder In the Managhan case, were in the room some time during Monaghan's questioning. Patrolman Lewis Ford, who arrested Monaghan, said Gunderman and Trooper Anthony Sanute, another defendant, were In the bertlllon room. He testified Monaghan was taken to the bertlllon room from the police station on Reilly's order: "Bring him over to my office. You nor no one else will take him away. Nobody is going to get him. He is my prisoner." Ford continued: "Gunderman came up In front of me. He said to Monaghan: 'You're a hard guy * * *.'" Monaghan lay on a bed in the room. Ford related, adding: "Officer Gunderman said, 'take off that coat, take off that tie, take oflT that shirt,' In a rough manner *  *." Ford said he demonstrated with the officers, then walked out and slammed the door. Dickson said he overheard Gunderman tell Monagham In the police station, "you'll damn soon know who .1 am." He later saw Monagham in the bertlllon room, Dickson said, testifying: "(He was) taking off his shoes or socks. He was stripped to the waist, with either shirt and underwear or underwear hanging loose on his trousers. "(Monaghan's face) * *  was disfigured. His nose was ordinarily prominent and arched. At that time It was fiattened like a pug nose. It was not In the center of his face. It was sort of crossed   *." Reporter said Reilly "opened the door and motioned" him to leave. Later, he said, he sat on the coping of a window of the bertlllon room and overheard Monaghan's pleas for "a chance." "What was the nature of Mo-nagham's voice," Margiotti asked. "Imploring and pleading. I heard someone say, 'we want to sober you up.    One time I heard water running.  * " "How many times did you hear what you thought was blows?" " *  Five or six   *." Later, he testified: "I heard what I thought were blows, then groans, and the voice (Turn to Page Ten) ESCAPED CONVicfs FREE 3 HOSTAGES IN FLIGHT Raleigh, N. C, Feb. 15. (yP)-Prison officials said seven desperate escaped convicts from the Cale-dona prison farm released their three hostages imharmed near Vass, in Moore county. Chester O. Bell, handling the search for the convicts from here for the penal division, said he received a telephone call from Captain I. D. Hinton of Calendonla, one of the hostages, saying Hinton, Steward W. L. Roberts and Walter H. Wlllard of Raleigh had been freed. Bell said Hinton told him they were put out on the highway three miles from Vass and the seven convicts then headed south. Hinton said the men planned to steal another car or rob someone to get money to continue their flight, Bell continued. "The three were put ont safe and unharmed but without a penny in their pockets," Bell said. NER8 lllE T US Policy Committee, Enraged Because afl Chief Called Strike Settlement 'Surrender,' Instructs Recall Of Card Washington. Feb. 15 (iT")-William Green, who rose from manual labor In coal mines to the presidency of the American Federation of Labor, appeared destined tonight to be expelled from his old union, the United Mine Workers. Enraged because Green called the outcome of the recent General Motors strike a "surrender" by John L. Lewis, the policy committee of the mine workers shouted unanimous approval of a resolution directing the union's officers to take away Green's card. Conflict Is Bitter Lewis is president of tli^ mine workers and is head of the committee for industrial organization. There Is bifter conflict between the federation leadership and the Lewis committee, which is seeking to build up huge industrial unions in mass production industries. The miners' policy committee said Green, a member of the mine union since it was founded in 1890. and secretary-treasurer from 1912 to 1924, was guilty of "treason" and a "betrayal of labor." Green called the committee's order "Hitlerlsm" and added: "I won't take it laying down." Throughout the General Motors strike. Green insisted that General Motors should make no agreement with the United Automobile Workers that would freeze A. F. of L. craft unions out of the auto industry. Lewis, director of the auto strike, is trying to bring every auto worker into the United Automobile Workers Union, regardless of craft lines. Split Grows Today's action widened a split between Lewis and Green that began behind the scenes many years ago and broke into the open In November, 1935, when Lewis organized his committee for Industrial organization. Green, now 64 years old, went to work in the mines near his Coshocton, O., home before he was 10. He became a local union leader in his 'teens, and rose through the various offices of the United Mine Workers until he was elected secretary-treasurer In 1912. He held that post until he was elected A. F. of L. president, after Lewis nominated him, in 1924. Green is still a dues-paying member of the Coshocton local of the U. M. W. IITILLS STUDIEmoySE No Conclusive Action Taken; Will Decide Today Whether To Hold Additional Public Hearings Washington, Feb. 15. {JF)-House members studied two widely divergent proposals for federal regulation of the soft coal Industry today but took no conclusive action on either. The ways and means committee turned its attention for the third time to the Guffey-VInson control bill and after three hours discussion agreed to decide tomorrow whether to hold additional public hearings. A small group of coal producers met with Representative Casey (D. Mass.) to consider his bill to create a federal coal trade commission. In contrast to formed years, coal operators were conspicuously absent when the ways and means committee began its sessions. Informed persons said both friends and foes of the measure had decided to spend no more money flghting or supporting It. Committee members quoted So-llctor-General Stanley Reed as believing the Guffey-Vinson bill was constitutional. Chairman Doughton (D. N. C.) said the committee would hear further testimony from justice department representatives tomorrow, but both he and Representative Vinson (D. Ky.), co-author of the bill, expressed belief further public hearings were unnecessary. "Committees of the house and senate have held 21 hearings since 1913 dealing witli coal, coal control, coal prices and conditions in the IndustiT." Vinson told reporters. "I can't see that any purpose would be served by holding any more." Except for revised labor provi-(Turo To Page Two) cmc, NiON OPEN LEYS TODIl! ON mmm issoes Corporation To Seek Fina Settlement Of Controverted Points With UAWA Price, Five Cents TWO BODY MAKERS GRANT PAY BOOSTS TO WORKERS 75,000 Men Back At Work In GMO Plants, As Efforts Being Made To Regain Capacity Production; Important Issues At Stake In New Conferences Detroit, Feb. 15. ^jT")-General Motors corporation, many of its production lines already humming in a drive to regain output lost during prolonged strikes, will seek tomorrow a final settlement of Issues with the United Automobile Workers of America. Only two of eight union demands -collective bargaining and union recognition-were settled in the agreement that ended the strikes last Thursday. Six others remain for negotiations starting tomorrow morning. Wage Increases Developments on the automotive labor front today brought wage increases for hourly workers of two body manufacturing concerns not connected with General Motors. The Briggs Manufacturing company put into effect today an indefinite increase, based on merit, for some 27,-000 hourly-rate employes. The Murray Corporation of America announced it would increase hourly wage minlmums tomorrow to 75 cents for men and 65 cents for women, and grant a five-cent increase to all workers now earning these minimums or more. The action affects about 10,000 employes. General Motors counted some 75,-000 employes back at work In its automotive plants after varying periods of idleness because of strikes and parts shortages, and pushed toward its goal of restoring full capacity operations next week. By March the corporation expects to produce 225,000 cars and trucks a month. General Motors announced increases for Its wage earners last week, as did Chrysler corporation and the Packard Motor Car company. Seek End Picce-Work The union denfands will be considered by tomorrow's conferees as agreed upon in the strike settlement, were listed by Homer Martin, U. A. W. A. president, on Jan. 4 as: "Abolition of all piece work systems of pay, and the adoption of a straight hourly rate In its place. "30-hour work week and six-hour day and time and one-half for all time worked over the basic work day and work week. "Establishment of a minimum rate of pay commensurate with an American standard of living. "Reinstatement of all employes who have been unjustly discharged. "Seniority, based on length of service. "Speed of production shall be (Turn to Page Ten) union,1ion-union"men in anderson hide feud, go peacefully to jobs Anderson, Ind., Feb. 15. (/P)- Hiding their feud, which flared into violence Saturday and brought military rule to Anderson, imlon and non-union automotive craftsmen marched peacefully today to their jobs at the Guide Lamp and Delco-Remy divisions of General Motors. With tension easing? Col. Albert H. Whitcomb, troop commander, granted permission to the United Automobile Workers of America to hold two meetings, their first under the military rule, and to distribute their publications. National guardsmen, bayonets flxed, patrolled the streets around the two plants as about 2,400 employes resumed work In the Guide Lamp factory, scene of a recent "sit down" strike, and about 7,000 workers returned to their jobs in the Delco-Remy plant. The guard was Increased as shifts In the factories changed. Citizens went about their business as usual. Union leaders planned a meeting of their strategy board and a session of their women's auxiliary. Victor Reuther, youthful union organizer, complained that thirteen union men arrested Saturday were being held in jail without bond. Colonel Whitcomb replied that military authorities were proceeding as rapidly as possible to Investigate what part, if any, the prisoners had in Saturday's clash, in which ten men were wounded. Egg ComplexiC'-3 Absorb Delegates In House Debate Charleston, W. Va, Feb. 15 (JP) -The house of delegates asked Itself riddles about hens today but quit without flnding any answer. It also brought on some bitter comment from Delegate Taylor (D) of Fayette that "we are making ourselves ridiculous in the eyes of the state." Delegate Brotherton (D) of Kanawha had a bill up to require the grade of eggs to be stamped on all crates. Delegate Heath (D) of Marshall wanted to know why a chicken crossed the road, and If a hen was frightened when It flapped Its wings. Said Brotherton: "A hen has a right to cross the road and I insisst it isn't frightened when it flaps its wings- It Is only saying hello. I ough to know-I've been selling hens for 35 years." Delegate Russek (D) Ohio, then put In an amendment to require farmers to attach on each hen a printing device which would stamp "fresh" on each egg (Turn To Page Two) SENATE VOTES 110 FLOOyHEIlS Bill To Allow State Department Of Public Assistance To Help Stricken Counties With Funds Passed, Sent To House Charleston, W. Va.. Feb. 15 (!P)- Tlie senate voted today to help counties visited by the January flood by passing a bill to allow the public assistance department to provide them with additional funds. The bill set out that during the emergency counties were forced to spend large sums for relief and rehabilitation and would be unable to provide the 15 per cent of their revenues required under the law for participation in public assistance. It would permit the counties to file with the department a statement of fiscal affairs and an application which if approved would allow additional funds for relief and aid to the Indigent. The senate approved the measure within an hour after the judiciary committee reported it out. It now goes to the house. Recess Held Tlie death of Delegate Wever (D) of Berkeley brought 15-mlnute recesses in both houses and the legislature will be adjourned Wednesday while a committee of fifteen attends the funeral services at Martinsburg. Resolutions were passed on the deaths of Wever and of Robert Horner, veteran political writer of the Charleston Daily Mail. Several members of the house and senate had just returned fi-om services at Parkersburg for Delegate Ben H. Butcher, who died on Friday. A resolution of commendation for President Roosevelt's program to reorganize the federal judiciary was sent to the house judiciary committee amid a protest by the sponsor. Delegate Bosworth, (D) of Randolph, that It was a move to kill the resolution. The senate judlplary committee has a resolution opposing the reorganization, sponsored by Senator Curtis (R) of Roane. Defeat Lobby Bill By a vote of 55 to 21 the house turned down a bill which would have required all lobbyist to register with the secretary of state and pay a fee of $3 before they would be allowed to discuss legislation with members.    ' The author. Delegate McKlnley (D) of Wood, claimed lobbyists had been active in attempting to defeat the bill. Long Session Although the house took definite action on only one bill it was in session all afternoon discusieing amendments to a half dozen measures on the calendar. With the start of the last month of the regular session committee activity reached its height. The house taxation and finance committee went into a night session to speed its program of placing the $62,000,000 budget bill on the floor by the end of the week. Chairman Strouss (D) of Monongalia said no hearing had been asked for yet, but the comjptiittee was making an item-by-item study to see^ what amendments it will offer. There Is a movement on to eliminate a $500,000 annual item for free textbooks. Roads committees of both houses held a joint night session to discuss Governor Holt's bills for reorgani-(Turn to Pa^e Five) Dust Blinds Southwest As Snow Blocks Roads In North By The Associated Press       i Brisk winds whlbped dust and! snow across a l,0C:-mile tier of western states yesterday (Monday). The snow drifted over highways in North and South Dakota while clouds of soil billowed through four states to the south, Kansas, Colorado, Oklahdina and Texas. A storm left roads blocked throughout North Dakota. Snow plows were brought out in some sections in an attempt to clear the way for travelers. Gusts of 30-mile-an-hour velocity swept the snow through the eastern half of South Dakota. All highways in the aberdeen area were impassable. A complete blockade threatened the Huron section. Fresh snow fell in parts of Minnesota but most of the roads were cleared.      Dust limited visibility to 100 feet at Guymon, Okla. Twenty power lines snapped near Tulsa. Oklahoma panhandle planters plowed protective furrows in their fields to keep the soil from whisking away. One farmer near Hooker. Okla., reported his wheat was blowing out for the first time in years. While agriculturists In the "dust bowl" reported they needed rain "at once," clearing skies presaged an end of the excessive precipitation in central and southern California. Floods there subsided after Inundating homes and loosing landslides over highways and rail lines. A huge rotary plow slowly carved a path through 15-foot drifts ahead of a rescue party moving to the aid of 34 snowbound persons near the north rim of the Grand Canyon In Arizona. Ten or 12 miners were isolated in the northern California mountains and four persons were unreported in southwestern Oregon. Five deaths were attributed to the weather, two Im Minnesota and one each in Oregon, South Dakota and North Dakota. ATTORNEY GENERAL TE If W strenuous Fight Over Court Finds Sen. Minton Supporting President's Aim VIRGINIAN TAKES ISSUE WITHCUMMING'S SPEECH First Lady Enters Fray With Statement Opposition Comes From Upper Middle-Class Persons Opposed To Social Legislation (By The Associated Press) Washington, Feb. 15. - 'Die strenuous fight over" Pi-esident Roosevelt's proposal to revamp the judiciary found Senator Minton (D. Ind.) defending Mr. Roosevelt tonight as the servant of the masses and Senator Glass (D. Va.) assailing the president's attorney general as "evasive." Minton, In a radio speech, urged enactment of the president's proposal to name six new Justices to the supreme court. The senator declared it would strip "flve men" of "an absolute veto power over legislative policies of the people's chosen representatives." Hits Cummlngs Senator Glass, taking direct issue with Attorney General Cummlngs' speech last night defending the court reorganization charged Cummlngs with "evasive, disln-genious and misleading" statements and said the country seemed more in need of an attorney general than of additional supreme court members. (The president proposed that he be given power to name one new judge for each judge past 70 who failed to retire.) Mrs. Roosevelt entered the fray with a statement that opposition to the program apparently arose from upper middle class persons opposed to social legislation, "From what they say," she said, "they have sometliing material they fear to lose." The opposition camp in congress offered a compromise constitutional amendment requiring the retirement of federal judges at the ages of 75. while influential senate Democrats pushed a house approved-bill permitting retirement at full pay at 70. Says Amendment Needed The amendment idea was advanced by Senator Burke 
                            

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