Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Centralia Weekly Chronicle Newspaper Archive: February 8, 1911 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Centralia Weekly Chronicle

Location: Centralia, Washington

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Centralia Weekly Chronicle (Newspaper) - February 8, 1911, Centralia, Washington                             VoL L CENTRALIA, WASHINGTON, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY No. 13. MILDRED BANNING REPEATS CHARGES OF CRUEIIY WHAT THEY THINK ABOUT THE "PROBE" School is Picked to Pieces By Pro- minent Citizens Who Denounce Unfair and Biased Methods BITTER ARE THE COMPLAINTS school, or the "violation of womanly' modesty. "No, I do not think the so-called far as I may judge from the Friday ;.t was lop-sided "from start to finish, and almost everyone there knows the same thing." Deplores Flogging of Girls The Rev. Robert J. Reid, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Centralia, says: am not familiar with condi- tions at the State Training School from personal observation, and know nothing beyond what I have beard and read. "I must say, however, that the flogging of girls in the manner described la a fearful thing, and no one can deplore a thing more than myself. Apart from whatever cruelty may have entered into such punishment, the moral effect calls for a remedy. I hope ithe charges are not true." ASPINWALL'S CLAIM SHE HAD RETRACTED CHARGES COMPLETELY SHATTERED Saturday's Proceedings at School Further Substantiated Hay Objects to Use of Steno- graphic Report Before it Has First Passed Through His Hands Paddling" of Young Women and Cruelty Are Grilled bru 7 to show me that the so-called invest- From a storm of protest and in- igatlon of the Training School was a dlgnatlon expressed by leading clti- square deal to the people or the In- zens against the unfair methods of mates. the so-called "investigation" of the "When a confessed woman-beater State Training School, the Chrolncle a violator .of womanly mod- selects the following opinions, and esty, at gets a pat on the will continue to publish others from; back for making bad girls worse, by time to time whenever space permits, j the state officials, It is time to expect An Outrage! anything. The Rev. H. W. Thompson, pas-j tor of the Presbyterian church of ing on Friday, and want Centralia who was present In the af-j right here, that it was an outrage. ternoon at the court house proceed- There was no effort at all to get the ings says it to him that the in- facts or give the case a fair hearing. vestlgatlon was entirely biased in! It was all on the side of Asplnwall present at that farclal hear- to say, of the officials of the reforma- ;and Brlffett, to do anything ui ____ _____ KI..W tory. to i smooth over the affair and bluff the "I think the methods of punish- people Into believing that the allega- ment of young methods tlons were without foundation, that were admitted by the adminls- "But even the hardest efforts of tratlon of the Training the 'Investigators" failed to deny an outrage It seems reprehensible that young women were Immodestly that the immodest beating of young beaten; that gross brutality had been women by a male official should go practiced: and that the Training unchecked and, like many School administration in the past haa citizens who attended the bearing, been a blot upon Justice." I cannot see how the offense can be "A Lop-Sided InvestiR officially condoned." "Investigation" Rotten, He Says Lop-Sided Investigation1' Theodore HOBS, one of the best known men In these parts, and a The way the investigation was man ot unquestioned fairness, conducted was rotten. From the frankly declares the investigation, testimony 1 heard at the hearing, IJ BO far as he saw it. unfair and wholly am satisfied there was sufficient evl-, biased. In part, he says: dence to warrant the discharge of j "From my own observation I both Asplnwall and Briffett. The'must say that the kind of punishment these men In- especially Friday afternoon's hesr- flicted shows the mto be unfit. The. the Training School ca proceeding was rotten. The gov-jwas unfair, wholly biased, one- the attorney general and the sided and something to be ashamed prosecuting attorney apparently "doing all they could to up and conceal T. Official Sanction of BrlltttUrjr W. H. "Prom ilie start 'there was an ttti- mlstakable indication of prejudice in favor of the Training School nd- I'lerk of Cen-1 ministration filing in with the tralla aiid tu6 best known, cltl-; strong ftnd utter ignoring of the Sens of the city Is plain-Spoken on j weak ftrti friendless. There was ills of the Wanner In which, not t ham) stirred, officially, to make Th8 investigation was conducted, case for the inmates; not an effort far as he saw it in the court by the Attorney-Geneva! of He says In Prosecuting Attorney lUlxton to get present nt fy at the bottom of or even to United Press, Leaned Wire) MANILA, Feb. largest in- dustrial exhibition ever held in the Philippines was opened at Zamboan- ga today by Brigadier General Pershing, governor of the Moro pro- vince and commanding general of the department of Mindanao. He was assisted by Governor W. Camer- on Forbes, Major General J. Frank- lin Bell, commanding the Philip- pines division and Rear Admirai John Hubbard, commandef-in-chie! of the V. S. Aslaatic fleet who also re- view the land parade participated in by thre regiments of infantry, one of cavalry, five battalions of Philip- pine scouts and eight companies and ;he band of the Philippine constab- ulary. In the parade were many high of- ficials of the insular government, nembers of the consular corps and representatives of thirteen of the wild tribes of Nindanao, who were brought together for the flrst time, The warships of fleet will take part in a water parade tomor- 3W. The exhibits in the fair grounds represent the work of the gevera tribes of Moros, the Manobos, Ma- gobos, etc., during the past year and samples of the agricultural products raised by American planters in Da- ALL EVIDENCE IN REBUTTAL FROM INTERESTED PARTIES Not One Witness Secured By County Attorney Buxton- Committee Told Some Unpleasant But Pointed Facts February 6. Mildred Running Reiterates Among the girls who were questioned by the Investigating committee Saturday morning was Mildred Banning. On the witness stand in the courthouse the day before, Superintendent Asplnwall testified, or tried to bnt was called down, that she 4 had retracted completely every 4 damaging statement she had made against the school. In her testimony before the com- mittee she reiterated every charge she has made, with the qualification, however, that she might have been in error as to the size, of the dungeon. Saturday's proceedings of the com- mittee investigating the State Train- ing School were all held In the Chapel of the school, beginning at 10 o'clock in the morning and last- ing until o'clock in the evening with an intermission at noon. A few more boys were examined and then for .from the state, report of the proceedings would show were placed in the witness chair and this to be the case; and that he was given an opportunity to tell the nice willing to. let the committee select things they know of the school. i any twenty men who attended the hearing in Chebalis Friday Newspaper Men Testify Following that, the newspaper believing such a committee would .ex- men present were called in turn Jo j testify and Dan Bush, postmastjl Chehalis, and Interested In the' halls Bee-Nugget, took advantage of 'hearine at the courthouse was pre- the opportunity to ally himself with iadiced and asked wltnes3 to name the committee then raised the con- e_ i tention that the crowd attending the the strong and against the weak. any- persons who had gone to the Harry Dunckley, of the Centralia 'bearing unprejudiced, or believing News-Examiner, was asked whether' the school is being properly con- he thought the investigation hadiducted- bad afterward thought been fairly conducted, and said committee was unfair. In its pro- he believed it had. and that he eeedtags. The started to name a tew such persons, but that could not think of anything the com- mittee had not done. A newspaper man named Barnes, cut off before he was through. v An attempt was made to get the a number of girls were also ques- tioned. From both the boys and girls further testimony extremely severe punish- representing the Tacoma Ledger was to W that he believed the also called. He said he had reported offenBes merlted punishments, lots of investigations, many of them He rePlfed ttot insofar the punish- more important than the one at hand. ment the was concerned, it in fact he appeared to wish to Have was for toe committee to it understood that he is the real in- that the committee thought it all vestigating kid, and that the present ri8ht to Punlsn until they had investigation met with his hearty on their _bodies for two or proval. Said He Would Whitewash He later told the representative of ments was elicited. Especially did the girls insist that punishments of Ollehnlis, "Anyone Ing could not fftll to %at It was a one-sided affair. two officials whoso duty wnsj lp sli in the prosecu- tion worked on tfce other side, ho BDpiivcnt 'effort wna dfnclnllj' mado to a case for tYio inmates even h} rt.c face of a mnss of tlmt was easily accessible by subpoenas. V outcome of the heftr'lhK wna n disappointment to alt lovers of fnlr piny ami justice, ft moans that the Rovernor nml tlW state sanction brutality, and plWfa tho official seal of approval wanton cnlblty to helpless girls It publicly'approves of rotnlnlng such men as a 'fconrpiwort h'oater of chft dren, nf.t'l a flogRcr young wojtmr In nn 'office where ho can do Ineffnhlo, Yiarm and Irrepftrablo Injury io thi young by brutalizing methods. "The out and speak fo themselves. It tlint Is justice ai some ot our state officials BOO It Veil and good, but .H Is hardly th nverftRO mnn or woman's Idea of jus tlco 'or humanity.'' "A Whitewash Affnlr" 'a. W. Burtpn haa this to sny: "H will take a lot of otplnlnlng estlgate fafcU outlined siglied tatemeutB, Tlmt there wnA plenty f was Indlrii'tcd by tho olmVio of reports thftt were ready 6 bo'brought out, yet there was not lie faintest ftttirt put forth to get witnesses by subpoena. With nn irray of fritnds ready to do their >est for the Training School ndmin- strnttoll, t'lie only thing done was to 'nil for rbstlmony from the crowd. "On the confession of Asplnwall himself, young women had boon floggod In an Immodest manner Tliit, alone, Is enough to qall for tho sternest censure. "If the boating of young women by n a man who haa the skirts of tho women I, for one, cnnnot see what on earth good tho institution Is to tho state or society as n place for tho build" Ing up of erring characters. "Tho whole ixffalr nppoara to TVo nicely patched up nnd smoothed over, but It will tnko (V good deal more patching up und smoothing over of this kind to make mo nee whore there !H any excuse for tho ad' mlttortly brutnllalnK methods of tho o nthe grounds, a fac of his palace In Jolo and Is ivin; there with several of his wives. The fair will close February 14. vao. Many of the cloths woven by I were too severe, and that they were natives are rich In design and color' beaten in aji inimodest manner by I and PiJHRl ifi brilliancy those hiariU- faetlll'ed in India or Turkey. The work in b rass and copper is unique and shows much originality. An Industrial school has been constructed on the fair grounds, where many evcellent samples of the crafts of the islands, are being turn- fed Olit; "The suliafi of Sulu has constructed three weeks was their matter. An attempt was made to dispute the fact that punishment had been that severe by referring to of the Chronicle that he Intended to Ithe testimony of the boys punished. give the school an unofficial white- wash in the Ledger. He carried out The committee admitted, however, that it had taken the boys' word'for his intention so far as his it and had not looked at their bodies. mltted. As to the punishment of the girls a man. ft. 0. AsplnWftl, tU8 tendent. in seVfifdl liistailces when girls had givSn testimony of this na- ture their records of misconduct, both before and after they had en- tered the school were exploited by the governor. Little or nothing was said of the records of girls wh6se testimony failed to discredit the school. I'nkers fo "the Goat-" A number of employes were oall- ed beforA the committee, including the two ttakers. As was indicated in the Vroceedings the flrst morning of the Investigation, it seems thnt an attempt will be made to make the Bakers "the goat" in the case, in- stead of the superintendent under .Practically All Charge? Substantiated, the witness said that the testimony H. A. gteele, 6ne of the editors ot .showed and the admissions of the of- the Chronicle, was called. After the ficers themselves was that Aspinwall preliminary questions as to residence j had beaten young women in an im- and business, cl cetera, he was ask- j modest manner, that since he had by GOrOTuor Hay why he had pub- admitted he had beaten young wom- In the Chronicle the stories that have appeared, He replied that en he was a woman-beater and that tie size of the instrument used had he had published them for the good no bearing on the case, the point to they would produce. He also stated !he considered being the manner and that with the exception of the size" of not the degree of punishment; and the dungeon, every charge publish- that if the committee wished to go ed had been substantiated by the Jon record as favoring keeping a worn- testimony before the committee. in charge of an institution effort wns then made by members of jot that kind, that also was up to the the committee to establish the fact committee. that the charges had been disproven, and the witness pointed out the fact Attention wns also called to the fact that during all the proceedings, that this evidence to disprove the governor, the attorney charges all came either from the of-1 general, nor the prosecuting attorney whoso charge they worked. The licors directly charged or from those j had ever asked either Asplnwall .or Bakers are young "men of good and absolutely under their nriffott whether or not the charges although they admitted: control. they had no experience in work of I Prosecution Xot Represented the kind they are now employed at. j Thfc witnosg alst, told the commit- They were working on a logging roail (cp aH ,iu.ough investigation at llordonux. before going to work nt luul not hoen repre- otTlCnio T) 1'ress, Wire) 'SKATTLK, Feb. Is holding her first recall election to- day. Tho wonther Is clear and much Interest is iioiiiK takou. Many wom- en   boys, that tho superintendent Ulnt Gov Hfty shown tho have known. In tho absence of any proof to the contrary the pre- sumption should lie that their em- ployer approved of their actions, fiut whether they approved or not, he certnlnhiR ia responsible. Ministers Testify Following the questioning of per- sons directly connected with tho In- stitution number of Chelmlta min- isters who take turn ahout snmo nttltiuio and had displayed bins all the way through. That the gov- ernor had been biased and that he ami tho attorney general and tho prosecuting attorney, Instead of do- ing nil they could to encourugv the giving of testimony In substantiation of, tlio charges, bad done all tlioy could to (Hsoourago It nnd to fltlffle Information, or to brenk down what- ever testimony of that nature thnt Ing sorvlwa on Sunday nt tho school was offered. Thnt tho stenographic igainst them were true or false Ask About Chronicle's Policy An attempt also was made to draw rom the witness what the policy of he Chronicle regarding the Training School would be in the future. Tha witness replied Unit whatever com- ment wns mado wonlil be substan- tiated by the records and that It possible the full stenographic report >f tho proceedings would he publish- ed, but that tho Chronicle's steno- grapher hnd tafcen only a partial re- port. Ho said thin report would published nnd that If tho committee would parmIt tho use of Its steno- graphic report. In that ovont, the en- tire proceedings would bo published. Did Not. rnhllHh All Sonntor Flshback asked If It wore (Continued on Pago Bight)   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication