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Centralia Weekly Chronicle: Wednesday, January 25, 1911 - Page 1

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   Centralia Weekly Chronicle (Newspaper) - January 25, 1911, Centralia, Washington                             OEHTBALU, WASHINGTON, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1911. GUY STEPHENS TAKES MEDICINE AND IJEAVES FOB HOMJE TO BE CAKED FOB IN AILING CONDITION, AND DROPS OUT OF SIGHT- NOBODY KNOWS WHERE HE MAN MAY BE DRIFTING AIMLESSLY ABOUT THE WOODS IN BITING COLD, OR MAY BE VICTIM OF EXPOSURE. LOCAL EX-WARRIORS OF SPAN- ISH-AMERICAN WAR AND PHIL- IPPINES INSURRECTION ARE PLANNING TO ORGANIZE BRANCH WITH MEMBERSHIP IN CENTRALIA AND CHEHALIS. Where is Gny Stephens? He disappeared In a mysterious manner last night after leaving for his borne at the Hawley House, and has not been seen since. A serious aspect to his case lies in the fact that he was 111 when he started home from his newly bought business place on South Tower ave- nue, and It Is believed that he wan- dered off In a dellrous condition. Stephens, who was about 26 years of age, Is the son of T. J. Stephens, a news agent, who lives at Main and King streets. He had been In ailing health for several days, and Dr. Du- mon last night administered medi- cine with the advice that the patient go home at once. The young man tooh the medicine and seemed bet- ter. Soon after, he left with a suit1 case, either in the direction of his rooming house, or the home of his father and step-mother. Nothing has been heard of him since. The young mnn was of good hab- Its and was not known to be of un- balanced mind, but It Is believed by his friends that his mind become de- lirious with lUtreBs and he wandered aimlessly off In a delirious state. If he has gone to Chehalls he will probably be picked up by the police, but there IB nothing to show that he took either a street car or a train, and nobody knows what direction he took. If he left for the Is situation is grave for the extreme cold of last night and have been rofflcJent to cause death from exposure. Friends of the missing man have started search parties in all direc- tions, 'and the father Is almost dis- tracted with grief. Mrs. Stephens, the step-mother of the young man, stated to the Dally Chronicle this afternoon that the "missing of the S'oung man was causing both herself and Mr. Stephens the deepest con- cern, and ehe bitterly blamed the friends of the ailing man for letting him go away in his condition. While It Is possible that Guy Ste- phens has b een picked up by some good Samaritan and being cared for until his Identity Is learned, there is dark doubt of his present safety, and the affair an unhappy se- quel. Mr. Stephens was a tnan of cor- habits and there IB no suspicion whatever .of his fault In the matter. January 24 Centralia is aiming at having a Spanish-American War Veteran's Post Or, to be more correct, it is aimed to establish a camp for the younger veterans with a membership from Chehalls and Centralia and other places near-by. The material seems to be of the best to start with, and it seems that" there would be no difficulty in gett- ing together' twice the number of highly eligible men to start the char- ter with. Among those who are eligible to enter, and who are known In both cities are Representative William Scales, now also a National Guard officer, Attorney Ben Rhodes, who recently resigned his office as County Court Commissioner, Cap- tain E. Storer-Tice, manager of the Twin City Light Traction Company, Superintendent Turner of the same corporation, J. J. Lynch, who still re- tains a commission In the California guard. W. J. Williams, the lumber man, and .a number of other veterans of the Spanish-American war and Philippines Insurrection now living In this vicinity. It has been suggested that the name of the new post should be giv- en after General Marions P. Maus, the doughty Indian fighter who is head of the Department of the Col- umbia, and who has been chosen by the President to remain with head- quarters at Vancouver Barracks in, view of his intimate knowledge of' Alaskan conditions and familiarity with Pacific Coast conditions. The matter of christening the new camp will come up later. NINE MEN AND WOMEN ARE SUM- MARILY EXECUTED Japanese Government Puts to Death Ten Persons Alleged to Have Plotted Against Life of Mikado Execu- tions Caiae as Surprise Following Star Chamber Sessions EVIDENCE SLIGHT, HAVE BEEN INNOCENT World-Wide Protest Made By Socialists, Who Claim Victims Were Not Anarchists and Had Advocated Only Peaceable Change in Form of Government (United Press, Leased AVire) TOKIO, Jan. Donjiro Koto- ku; his mistress, Snga Knuno; and ten other socialists, who by the gov- ernment are called anarchists, were hanged today, following star chamber sessions in which they were convicted of plotting against the life of the Mikado. The hangings started at 9 o'clock this morning and ended at 1 o'clock NEW NATIONAL POT LEAGUE NATIONAL REPUBLICAN PRO- make a nation-wide, systematic flght GRESSIVE LEAGUE COMPOS- for popular government Kl> OF INSURGENTS, ELECTS The plans for the organization OFFICERS AND PLANS NATION- which had been under wav the I WIDE CAMPAIG.-s FOR PO1T. opening of congress, were consura-i LAR" GOVERNMENT SENA- mated at a meeting Saturday night! TOR BOI'ILVK. OF OREGON. IS when a declaration of principle, and PRESIDENT ALL a constitution were signed. The! HOLDING OFFICE KXCKIT PIN- following were elected officers: Sena-i Bourne, of Oregon, Gov. Oaborn, vice-presi-1 dent; Charles Crane of Chicago, vice-i i president. WASHINGTON-, Jan. j The executive board is announcement was made today of jot Ex-Forester Plnchot: this afternoon. Not one of the ten appeared fright- ened, but bravely and with a firm step, marched to the scaffold, at the same time declaring their willingness to die for the cause of liberty. Socialists all over the world had sent protests to the Mikado's govern- ment against the executions and It was understood that the sentences of all the original twenty-sir would eventually be commuted to imprison- ment. The executions came as a sur- prise. Socialists declare that there was no evidence against the accused; that they were socialists and not anarch- ists, and at no time had advocated any but peaceful means of changing the form, of government; and that no plot against the life of the Mikado had ever been considered. COUNTY ATTORNEY SAYS INVESTIGATION SO FAR SHOWS BAD CONDITION ENTERPRISE OF CROOKKD TOI.K, LEAVING FOR OLU COUNTRY, LANDS HIM IN JAIL FOR FORG- 1XG BOSSES' IS PATCHED UP BY PAYMENT. (United Press, Leased Wire) UA-vuicIBli-, the organization of the National Pro-man Kent, of California; George' gresslve Republican League, formed by progressive senators and congress- men nnd others. The plan Is to Record, of New Jersey; and Senators Clapp, of Minnesota, Rrlstow of Kansas, and Lenroot, of Wisconsin. NOVELIST IS SHOT DOWN IN DOOR OF LEADING NEW YORK CLUB _ ASSAILANT COMMITS SUICIDE WITHOUT RKVKAL- ING PHILLIPS IN CRITICAL CONDITION. (UnftM ProM, Loaned Wire) NEW YORK, Jan, Graham the novelist, was today fired upon and ferloualy wounded by an unknown aiiallant, who afterwards committed suicide by firing the last shot of his revolver Into his own body. Phillips was attacked while standing in the door of ono of the principal clubs of the city. The man fired five shots at him. Phillips was rushed to Bel- lovito hospital. His condition Is critical. His assailant who died without revealing his Idenlty, was well dress- ed and of destlngulihed appearance. January 24 Putting the finishing touches to his American education acquired af- ter' a couple of years' sojourn on these shores. John WHtkowski, a Pole of Dryad, tried a little frenzied finance before leaving for his native shores with the savings of his work here on Saturday. The effort was fairly .well planned along modern lines, but the arrangements went awry owing to the acumen of Sheriff Urquhart who is ubiquitous on such occasions. Mr. Wlttkowski's plan was to get some raiment on the easy system be- fore fleeing across the ocean and this is how he tried It: Walking into the clothing store of Huber Sulllcan, he explained that he wanted some clothes but had no money. But, he svarred, he had plenty of money com- ing from the Doty Shingle Mill Com- pany. Would the tailors accept his order for payment on the company. The firm would. Whereupon, Mr. Wlttkowskl wrote out an order for the price of a quantity of glad rags and bore off the goods In triumph. His farewell to his compatriots In Doty and Wlnlock proved his undo- ing, for Sheriff Urquhart was hot on the trail a few hours Inter, and land- ed the enterprising Pole In the latter tor named city as he was bidding a farewell to his friends. The matter was patched up yester- day by payment of the Amount from the hoard of savings, and the culprit was allowed to proceed on hli way. SUPERINTENDENT OF TWIN CITY LIGHT TRACTION COMPANY ESCAPES THIS TIME AVITH .MANGLED LAST TREE IT WAS WORSE. January 24 For the second time in as many months, the Grim Reaper took a grab at Superintendent G. M. Turner of the Twin City Light Traction Com- pany last night. The grab missed, but Mr. Turner left part of his flesh behind and Is now suffering from a I crippled hand. His right hand is badly mangled, with the thumb broken, and his wrist is also injured. However, he ,wlll be able to continue his duties, and his hand will be as i good as new in a few weeks. j Turner was looking after the start- ing of a car at the plant, and, with his usual Impetuous energy, essayed to rush things along with a willing hand. One of the willing hands got caught, and that is why it is in splinters today. About two months ago Turner was caught between two cars and was so badly crushed that his life was a toss-up for recovery for twenty min- utes. He recovered, however. and that was the last heard of the mis- hap so far as he went. Superintendent Turner, by the way, served in the Spanish-American war, and saw some real-thing active ser- vice chasing the elusive brown flea on the rice-paddles. Is Gathering Evidence Against Reform School Officials- Satisfied Nature of Punishment Inflicted Can Not Be Excused on Ground That Such Are Neces- sary Measures of Discipline WILL NOT WAIT FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL When Case Is in Shape for Action Prosecutions Will Be Started By Lewis County Officials Without Wait- ing for State to Take a Hand January 24 A snug little check for was handed over to Mrs. Flora Smith, widow of Policeman Smith who was killed on the railroad track lately, the payment being made by Secre- tary E. F Hughes yesterday after- noon. The money was due from the Brotherhood of American Toe- men, and the check came from head- quarters In Dea Molnes. Iowa. The prompt payment of this money, with- in a month after the death of the husband, was welcomed by Mrs. Smith and her young daughter. It Is not known at moment what other money she will receive as the result of Mr. Smith's death. January 24 "Undoubtedly boys in the State; Training School have been beaten! more severely and more unmercifully than can be excused as a measure for the maintenance of necessary discipline. These severe beatings seem more inexcusable by reason of the fact that they do not appear to' have corrected the evils for which they were applied. I am conducting an Investigation; have conferred with Sheriff Urquhart and others; and there will be developments In due time, or as soon as I have things In shape to take action. The fact that theTralning School Is a state institu- tion does not exempt It from the au- thority of the officers of Lewis county, and It Is not necessary to wait for the attorney general to conduct the prosecution." The foregoing are the words of J. R. Buxton, prosecuting attorney of Lewis county. There Is very little doubt now that things at the State Training school will be aired. The officers of the In- stitution state they are desirous of a thorough Investigation; they say that In view of the numerous rumors of outrages there, that they are on- ;ltled to a thorough and Impartial nvestlgatlon as the only way of dis- pelling the whlea BOW over them. Every day reports of outrages of various nature are brought to the ironicle office. While some ot them appear on the surface to have little foundation, the surfact indica- tions of others bear the marks of truth. But when the Chronicle has given these rumors editorial consid- eration, they have received no news- paper comment and will not until their authenticity is established. The only charges which have been pub- lished have been made under oath. One report, the correctness of which, it should be easy to establish or disprove Is that Detail Officer Baker, who is reported to weild the cruel paddle at the Training School which is becoming a matter of state- wide comment, met at the depot la Chehalis a runaway boy. who was be- ing returned. The youngster was a little feHow about arteea years old, bnt very small for his years. Haker. so report has It, struck this boj while they were on the street In Che- halls and befort. several witnesses. He struck the boy on the hw and knocked him down. It tit stated that the boy was kicked. v crowd gathered and witnesses ar> numer- ous. That was last Septe Is still In the Train Inn Scho. Jaw to still swollen and out condltlosi to hare bee ed by the Wow struck by t Ing School r He "I his "IllO- -nln-   

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