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Centralia Weekly Chronicle Newspaper Archive: December 28, 1910 - Page 1

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Publication: Centralia Weekly Chronicle

Location: Centralia, Washington

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   Centralia Weekly Chronicle (Newspaper) - December 28, 1910, Centralia, Washington                             Weekly Chronicle VoL I OEMTBAUA, WASHINGTON, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 28, 1910 No. LOS ANGELES ARE FATAL WHILE DANCE IS IN PROGRESS CIGARETTE IS DROPPED INTO OPEN KEG O ARE DEAD AND THREE NOT EXPECTED TO LIVE CAUSE MAY HAVE BEEN MALICIOUS- NESS. GRBBN'SBURG, Pa., Dee. Three persons are dead, eight in danger of death from their injuries and 10 more are in the Westmore- land hbspiU4-wlth serious burns as a penalty for somebody's carelessness o.r somebody's vengeance while min- ers were holding a Christmas celebra- tion at Keystone shaft near here late Christmas Eve. The accident occurred at the home of Michael Wilding while he was en- tertaining a party of about 25 men and women. It Is believed that on of the men while a dance was in progress carelessly threw a clgarete butt und- er the stairway. Twenty-flvo pounds of black mining powder are said to have been stored there In an open can. Flames from the powd- er shot through the room and the acid smoke blinded the dancers as ftiey tried to escifje. The clotlng on nearly all the dancers took fire from the explos- ion, and although tho room .was burned and blackened, the house was not seriously damaged. Men In ad- joining houses rushed In with blan- kets and wrapped them about the burning women, saving many from death. A special train brought the in- inred to this city. TERRIFIC EXPLOSION .DOER SLI- GHT DAMAGE TO IRON WORKS HAS BEEN ACTIVE AGAINST REORGANIZATION OF UNION LABOR AND THAT IS BELIEVED TO PROVIDE MO- TIVE. LOS ANGELES, Cal., Dec. dynamite explosion yesterday morn- ing did damage to the Llewellyn Iron works. The explosion occurred at o'clock a. m. The police are looking for three len who were seen running from the building a short time before the ex- plosion. J. E. Ashbury, a night watchman who was in the office of the building, was slightly injured. Windows of the adjoining plants of the Lacy Manufacturing company, the Johnson Machine works and the Stearns Gas Engine company Were blown out and minor damage was done. Residents of the Westlake district, two miles away, were awakened by the force I of tho explosion which shook the whole neighborhood. Who placed the supposed -charge j of dynamite is unknown, but It is tie- llc.ved to be the outcome of the gen- rnl labor troubles ot Los Angeles, In which the Llewellyn company has been prominently Involved, TWO BOMBS EXPLODED IN VICI- NITY OF NEW YORK GAMBLING HOUSE DENIZENS OF DANCE HALL THROWN INTO CONFUS- ION EXPLOSIONS FIVE MINU- TES APART. NEW YOriK, Dec. the cul- mination, the police say, of a feud of long standing among Harlem gamb- lers, two dynamite bombs were ex- ploded within five minutes of each other early this morning In vestibules of Harlem houses. Several thous- and dollars' damage was done and the I Centralia, Dec. 27. A personal message was sent by the Governor of Virginia to Governor Hay yesterday asking that William McClenahan be held on extradition until officers are sent to the County seat Of Lewis to bring the man to the scene of his alleged crime. The message was transmitted to Sheriff Urquhart who has custody of the wantea man.- McGlenahan, It will be remember- ed, was arrested in Chehtlis two weeks ago while the Rebekahs were in convention, and taken to the county jail by Sheriff Urquhart on a murder charge dating back to 1906. The authorities were notified in Vir- ginia and the grand jury there press- ed the charge. McClenahan came to Lewis County soon after his flight fol- lowing the killing of a man named Richardson, and settled in the coun- try where he prospered as a farmer. His arrest on the murder charge astounded all -who knew him In this county as a quiet, unassuming man, and he had no lack of friends to pro- test that he was innocent. The ac- neighborhoods were thrown into an uproar. Both bombs went off shortly be- fore 3 o'clock this morning a block apart on 116th street. The only clue the police have to the Identy of the pr-rpetrator Is the statement of a j policeman who described a mysteri- ous man who raced through the street In a black taxlcab shortly be- fore the explosion. On one side of the place of the ex- plosion is a new social club and i the otber Is a dance hall. The windows of these buildings were shat- tered and the club members and a body of dancers were thrown Into confusion. An IniTant later there came another violent crash a block away. It blew out both the inner and outer doors and routed nearby residents from their beds. nth places are near a which -vas raided not long ngo by Deputy Police Commissioner Driscoll. After the raid the commissioner announced 'hat gamblers had raised a fund of to kill him. I cused man himself has nothing to say, and bears his plight with stoi- cism. 1 The arrest of this man was purely upon a brief description Issued years ago, and it was largely due to Sheriff's retentive memory and close obsevation of details that led to the apprehension. SOF IPIECK IS LARGEST DEAL EVER RECORDED IN LEWIS COUNTY IS FILED THIS AND SULPHUR SPRING MAY BE AF- FECTED WITH RAILROAD BUILDING Centralla, Dec., 27. The largest deal ever recorded in Lewis County, and one of the largest in the history of the state of Wash- ington, was filed this morning with Auditor Swoiford at the Court House when the deed of the big railroad merger went on record. The amount entailed IB 000. The parties to the deed are the Oregon Washington Railroad Company to the Oregon Washing- ton Railroad Navigation Company. The document bears the following signatures: W. W. Cotton, J. G. Wil- son, John B. Harmon, B. T. Riter, Sr., J. D. Farrell and R. C. Spencer. Mention has already been made ol this merger in the Centralia Dally Chronicle, but a new and significant phase is lent to the transaction by article No. 4 of the deed which makes specific reference to the ter- ritory covered "at or near Winlock UNLESS COLORADO MEN DO NOT HACK DOWN AN DFORGET PRO- V POSED LAW DISFRANCHISING WOMEN, WOMEN MEMBERS OP MAY DEPUIVK MKX OK HALI.OT. (Vnilort Press Ix-nsoil Wire.) DENVER, Colo., Dec bill to deprive men of the right to vote will bo Introduced in the state legls- Inture, If the mensure now being fratnd by men, Intended to disfran- chise women, Is Introduced. The framers of the latter measure con- tend thnt the women of. the state have not proved themselves good voters and thnt women suffrage has proven a fnllure. A bill depriving men of the right to vote Is tho answer the suffragettes make. Uoth men and women nro membera of tho legislature which soon meets and n hot fight Is predict- ed. (I'm ed Press I .cased Wtro.) VICTORIA, 11. C., Dec wire- less the steamer Tecs stating (lint, they had found the cabin and life-boats of tho nilsMng steamer St. Denis In the neighborhood of is taken as continuation that the ship was wrecked.' The hoot formerly piled between Victoria and Northern lirilish Colum- bia. She carried a crew of fourteen men under Capt. Dnvls. Their fate Is unknown. The ship left Vancouver, Nov. IS M.UOK GENERAL WOOD TELLS UtH'SK COMMITTEE OX MILI- TARY AFFAIKS HAS XOT ARMS XOR Gl XS KXOCGH KOR EVEX ONE BIG COM Ql'ES- TIOX OF BRAVERY. (United Press Leased Wire.) Dec. LIMPIA GE1S BUILDING (United Press Leased Wire.) OLYMPIA, Wash., Dec. T. Cavanaugh, postmaster here, who has just returned from Washington, D. C. announces that before the Summer is over work will be started on the new postofllce in this city. Olympia is the only state capital in the United States that has no public building, and Mr. Cavanaugh says that the au- thorities conceded that the postoffice surveyor-general, forestry bransh and Federal land oSBce in Olympia should have a home of their OWL. He alsb announced that he -'111 neeJ no additional help to handle the postal savings bank branch, whlsh will open in Olympia, January 'i. The department wall accept deposits from none who does not get his mall through the Olympia postofflce. Oth- ers may buy stamps each, and de- posit them when a branch bank is opened "at th postofflce in their com- munity. When the new postoffice is built Mr. Cavanaugh hopes to have provision made for the handling of the postal savings bank business. SERGEANT MARKLEY, ONE OF FEW SURVIVORS OF BALANGI- GA SLAUGHTER, SETTLES WITH FAMILY COUNTY. IN LEWIS Centralia, Dec. 27. An echo of the massaeree of Balan- glga on Samar Island, when a com- pany of the 9th Infantry were near- ly all slaughtered by the treach- erous Filippine in 1901, is wafted to Centralia by the visit of former- Sergent G. F. Markley who is buying a ranch at Mossy Rock. Markley is a survivor of one of modern his- tory's most appalling tragedies of warfare. It will be remembered that the Company of soldiers were seated at breakfast on the morning of September 29, 1901, when they were surprised by ten times their number of dusky foemen who seized all the arms and ammunition, and slew nearly fifty of the soldiers. After a furious fight between the armed Filippinos and the Americans, to Sulphur Spif.ngs." This is inter- who seized improvised weapons such preted to mean that something new as shovels and clubs, the survivors is contemplated in the plans to affect those places which may be included in other construction operations to follow. In any event, the transaction is one of sufficient magnitude to make it of strong local interest. (United Press Leased Wire.) j CHICAGO, Dec. settlement of the demands made by mem- bers of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and the Order of Hallway Conductors, employed on sixty-one Western railroads ,is looked for with- in a few days after the Erst of the i new year. A ten per cent increase is considered probable. The railroad conference which was suspended ever Christmas was resum-. ed today. made their escape to canoes and to sea, leaving the ground cover- ed with the dead and dying. Hun- dreds of the natives were killed Ja the fray and in the summary ven- geance that followed, General "Jakle" Smith earned his title of "Hell Fire Jake" with his slogan ol "Make the place a howling wilder- ness." General Smith was dropped from the service in the investigation that ensued, and such of the soldiers of the decim Stated company as sur- vived their wounds, either remain- ed in the service or went their ways in civil life. A number of the Old Guard have since died and nobody seems to Know just how many now living. Marklev distinguished himself bv defending the stairway to cartridge room, like the Zulu Umslepogas of Haggard, with an axe handle and a shovel, and killed many before he fell. He recovered from his wounds and has now a missing and other scars as souvenirs of the occassion. Markley is now visiting Chehalis with his brother W. A. Markley, and the pair will buy an eighty acre ranch this week. The gas motor follows tho even tenor of Itn wny day nml still It has n bnd record. Widow's woods sometimes boar Hood, but they never -become olmox- loun. MT. E1NA ml passed Cape Flattery Nov. 21, j the house committee on military af- nnd since then nothing has been fairs, Major V.eneral Wood, chief of hoard of her. She was loaded with j staff, declared the nation to be unpre- coal and Mexico wns her destination, i .ared to meet the hostile moves of j lirst class nations. The testimony >s made public today. He testified that the arms and ammunition at the disposal of the government at this time is Insufficient for a single en- gagement of combat. Ho declared tlint lie feared an 1m- mediate emergency', and explained his plan for roorsunlziiiK tho military forces of tho country so thny would bo more mobile. "There Is no use talking about our patriotism and fighting ho told tho committee. "We have thorn, but of tho bravo men engaged In the Spanish-American war, we. lost about j (I'nllocl Press Len.-ioil Wire.) PARIS, dispatch from Naples today says Mt. IStna la In oruptlon. Few details nro glvon, but tho eruption Is Raid to be tho worst In yearn, 20ft volunteers, but burled four thou- sand who died of disease." Ho doclaroil that he feared the artillery Is useless, but that ho believed the Son Const well fortified. NEW YORK. Dec. threats coming from all over tho country, In open defiance of the Klack H.ind wrath, Judge Fawcott to- day passed sentence upon tho reput- ed Rlack Hand kidnappers of Michael Hlzzla and Louise Kffto Longo, aged S years, to tho extreme limit of tho law. Tho looder, Spennlffo receiv- ed tho death sentence. Pappengo and Mary Raphael were sent to pris- on for Indeterminate terms of from 25 to 4fl years. The announcement of tho sentence was grootod by groat demonstration In court. Tho kid- nappers hold their victims for 20 days and only released them on pny- tnont of he'ivy ransom. TICK ACTS AS CONDUCTOR FOR j SEVERAL TRIPS I Ceutralia, Dec. 2V. I Passengers on the night service of cars on the Twin City Light Trac- j tion Company last night were treat- j ed to the unusual sight of the gener- al manager collecting fares in place of the regular conductor. This hap- pened because the staff was short- when the night run came on. One of the" conductors was on leave, and the other, who was expected to take the car out. was taken 111 nt the last moment. The day men had gone off shift and there was nobody there to take the car. Manager Tice was equal to the situation by donning the coin belt and punch, and worked several runs himself. m is in 01 LISI OF PRAISE FROM MERCHANT ST. JOHN. OREGON Centralin, Dee. Mr. nml Mrs. Alexander Scales, of St. Johns. Oregon, are spending the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. William Scales of this city. Mr. Scales is n brother of the grocer of Centralia and Is himself a prosperous mer- chant In Portland's suburban neigh- bor. Centralia always did look good to tho visiting Mr. Scales who renews his felicitations on'bis latest visit. Ho believes Contralla has everything a .sniiR central city needs for pro- gress and sayn It Is no 'wonder that Contralla finds Itne'f tho fastest grow- ing city In Washington. (United Press leased Wire.') WASHINGTON. Dec. suit to dissolve the so-called Electrical Trust will be instituted as soon as the papers can be drawn up. It was semi-officially announced today that Wade Ellis, former assistant attorney general, is handling the cast for the government, and that he will not wait for the supremo court decisions on th Standard Oil case, or that of the American Tobacco company, which now being but will start a now Issue. Tho companies to bo made defend- ant In the now suit arc th General Klctrlc, tho Wcstlnghouso and sever- al others. They will be charged with conspiracy to restrict trade through the operation of tho patent laws. There aro still ns big fish In the sea ns havo ovor been rniiKht ......but none as big nstho ntorlt-n thnt havo been toltl.   

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