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Centralia Daily Chronicle Examiner: Tuesday, January 21, 1913 - Page 1

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   Centralia Daily Chronicle-Examiner (Newspaper) - January 21, 1913, Centralia, Washington                             CENTRAL! CHRONICLE EXAMINER 1MIRSS I.KAHED WIKK EVENING LOCAL FIT TO WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JAXUAKV 21, 1013 XU.MilKK TOLCANO CO LIMA IS KIU'I'TJN'G s (JL'AXTITIKS OK day this sold City Attorney lleul, "and 1 saw men there playing poker. In my own mind I Iniow they were tut, of course, there was no way o[ proving it, because there utts no money in sight. I ad- Ihat the iiroiiosod ordinance is pret-i ly drastic, Lu ft we are to pvoiiib- j it ganVbllng in .saloons, (he only way i aermnplisli is hy tile I nssnge of tl-e ordinnnccy. Mayor Thompson aliii litlle to the subject, except that lie would like; another In whk-h to think and AND I'OISONOl.'S CASSIJS oi' COAST vii.fiAoi'.s AIM: INTO IN LIVDS talk over the matter. I CAMPS AM) MILLS I'ommisshm meeting one of I tho shortest on record, tnsUng only about 15 minutes ANOTHER MILL NOW ASSURED LlvUlS COUN- TY HITIIKH SUIT IIOXVN OH CltllTLKI) IIY STOKM IN 120 S II PE E! t I r OF LEWIS COUNTY. Another iii Lewis roiinty low a ccoi tliiii; u> ChoFi- SIHJ'.V, v.'ho n incrcail- e r-si.iblishmcrt at Lltlnll, and' i who is tho principal backer of thei CltilCCI'JL. I slat-1.-- tl.at is tio in-1 -on cf .loiiu in nr.il him ftP VHT EC. If to rri'ot .1 UO.iKiO c aracity saw- I LU n'J Li at llic new station o: Hunker on j v.ili be up-: v. ill ho' IBTFRFITim IlilLriLuMu! CHOWM Ol-' TKACHKUS AM) I'AKKXTS TL'HX Ol'T TO IIKIJ) AT HIGH SCHOOL of humanity on rod through Cnstle 11 union employment niul houses in this country was made np ot tho asriculinnil class f mm Nnvlhoru 10 u rope. Pros- csiant In religion, strong in body healthy in tn'nnl, they speedily ilaUM our ways and are today l the strong Bulwarks of A institutions. 1 n jilace of the liiond ffotn the K en nil i an v inn Pc- [nnsula, Duniimrk and (1tjriiinuy, an: getting (ho short, dark man from Austria, Hungary, Ualy and the I'cnltisuta. Xot stroni? their uorthern neighbors they arot nevLTlheiess, vjistly inferior in iral and KOt'Lal virtiicn, but, ns an I eminent author lias said, "this is flue to ami not brain (juality. Why arc- iheso peoply of, j Southern ICarojio KO different today ivliKion, sentiment and niunlalily V Jf- {1 U W from ;ipop3o of Northern and i UlTrMU. Western iLEO 3E1IE iiciiiKU iiorsi: VOTKS nowx 1SII.I. PliOVMHNC; J-'Olt THU> OP KXTIIU-; TO TUB STAT1-: INSTITUTIONS l-'OJii'KI) TO Ol'KJlA- TIONS-- i-'oi'i; i.v HILLS IX I.Vf lli'S AT NAPAViNI-: HVNIHIMIIS I1KAI) OV LIVH- sioi K MAV1-; UAILUO.UI TMACKS AHIC DKKI'- LY lil'IUKI) (Uiiiteil J'rusa Leased Wire) .MEXICO CITY. .Ian. 21 --The vol- cano Coliiu.l, located on the sea coast south of here, io vomiting eaoi'nious quantiticH of lava, sand and poisoti- ons passes, and one ot" the Cost dis- astrous eruptions in the history of Mexico is feared. The eruption has sent thousands of inhabitants from numerous villages on the coast (lee- Ing to the inland in fear of their As far as known there have been jio fatalities, although hundreds of .head of livestock have heen killed. The railroad tracks in the vicinity of the volcano are covered to the depth of -several feet with lava, and it Is feared that several towns In the vicinity will be wiped out. J. W. Prichett, who recently mov- ed to Centralia from Mexico, lived for some time In the vicinity of tho erupting volcano, going there at the conclusion of the recent rebellion When Interviewed this afternoon Mr. Prichett stated that Mt. Colima was accustomed to erupt periodically, al- though during the time that he lived at its base, none occurred of such as the one reported to- MAY PASS ORDINANCE PROHIBITING PLAYING CARDS IN SALOONS Tho city commission allowed one bill, listened to the reading of reports from the city engineer and from tho city treasurer and approving a couple of bonds, and that was tho sum and substance of tho doings at tho meet- ing of the city commissioners this at- It is evident from rmarks passed, that the commission is con- templating the passage of on ordin- ance prohibiting card playing in sal- oons. Th.e matter wins 'discussed In- formally a tew moments hoforo ad- journment. ".I was In a saloon one mi') n'pst of ChftiP.li Creek. Le ont miles 3 [itai- the month of: i have made I; nuclei-: ro.Mi'AXV TO i'i r ntii'iihK SIIIKT THIS rr MIS TALK liALKAX QI'KHTIOX Ml'I.L'A-j ix MAST, i i.v i.vsTitui rivi: i ii i ith i-s, fur .he] Ol' i 10 BS5MU. (United Press Leased Wire) I The and mills Lewis county have all been rill: Cluh, held at tlie hlKli school was attended by with tiie Mill' Leasing Company ot; for logs, wliiih will be do'.i-.' I etreJ at he mill boom in tho Che-: ia river. It is not necessary to rlrivo the as the losging road, re-aches the rivt-r at a point opiiosite sllllt liowu or badly crippled by the leacllcl's cini' the rail! site. The site is considered snow storm. The Coal Creek scl'00' furnished the one of tho best on the South Bend company of Chehalis ia still running] f.or ttlc and Miss and ,v3tli nn ample supply of ts lind iogg1ngi ,f ls rendered a voral solo. Prof. a; of tiu; v.-arld. Tin kr-y wiih ;i [on at' n-varly forty Dillions, on side, and iiul- with ;i population ttiree and one-half millions; .Sorvia witli two and one-half millions; .Montcne- I irro wiiti two hundtccl fifty thousand, [rind Urc-oco with three millions, com- The meeting of the Monday Night i posing the Balkan stales on the oth- SKXIOU nv JVMOItK 10 TO 15 JUMOliS i.osi: FAST TO SNMOIt.S iicu.M TO EF- T SALONS SAVK STATi-; MOlIi; THAN IH Sl'KX'L1 is VISITIM; IXSTITTTIOXS ILL USIER Al STAMl-OIV IIKTWKKtf Ll-XilSLA- (T IS NOW l'l> TO CiOVKIl- NOR TO DKC1MK last' cr Iliu'p In the1 general public. The I this death struggle. logs- Tile Snow proposition looks good to al] who havo investigated it. BOY SHOOTS HIMSELF any more snow- it will have to quit. The logging operations of the Yeo- mans lumber company of Pe Ell have Darkness Kave a talk on current events and Judge Dysart spoke on Lialkiin Question." WHILE OUT HUNTING. had to ceaseowin g to some 20 inches- At the conclusion of the meeting Hoy Bennett, the eight-year-old son of A. N. Bennett, a Newaukuiu Val- ley farmer, accidentally shot himself in the shoulder Ittat Saturday while trying to bring down a squirrel. CHESTER H. ALDR1CH. Republican Governor of Nebraska, Whom Democrat Will Succeed. of snow in '.Po and from three to I'our feot In the hills. The 'McCormicfc Lumber company tit McCormtclt expected to put a double shift the l3Ui of this month, "but ow- ing to the storm Is much Imndicapped two fast intcrclass games were play- ed in tlie high school gymnasium. In the opener the Senior girls de- feated tlie Junior girls hy a score of 1G to 15, the Junior's running up too big a lead in the opening period to lenls to overtake m running even one shift.' There their "PPo 16 inches of snow there, with htout ttiem- In tne secontl game fho Sen- wiith same amount in the hills as boys secured revenge on tho Jun- Po Ell. Yesterday it Nvns reported raining ftard at JlcCormick. Ml -XapavOie there 4s over 18 Incho Df snow and yseterday morning the fall was unusually heavy from 7 o'- clock to noon, possibly throe inches more. Jn Chehalis and this city tho snow fell for a short time yesterday, out soon ceased. There was a biting southerly w-lnd all day. The Robinson- Brown camp Is still logging but under Emery Nelson's mill at Napavino is closet! Jown completely. The logging opera- tions have been stopped as well. Trucking in the -mill yards is an im- posslbiUy. The HIM Logging compan plant at Adna is nlso shut down for :he present. Thcs big log and drift jam at tho logging road trestle of the Wisconsin iors for the girls' defeat, running up a total of 3S to 21 on tho under classmen. Temple's basket shoot- ing and Haney's work from the foul line were the features of the game. Judge Dysart's talk at the club meeting previous to the games was a decidedly instructive and interest- ing one. He outlined the present situation in the far east in detail, his dealing with his subject IjcinR a comprehensive one. Judge Dysart spoke as follows: A new social problem is soon to be presented to the people of the Pa- cific coast. Upon the completion of the Panama Canal in 1913, the horde of immigrants now descending upon the shores of the Atlantic will In a great measurn, he unloaded at Lumber company at LHtell haa all Los Angeles, San I'rancisco and Se- Dtcn cleaned out, but the bridgo was attic. These people, dull and stipnr- weakened so that it is feared a Chin- ook Would mean thf> bridgo would bo swept out. The 'inlM. Is also being ing operated. At Morton there Is two and a. stitious, lawless with a disposition to criminality; servile for genera- tions, without conception of politi- cal rights, are bound to ho a potent factor in the development of the half'oct snow and more falling-.. Tho'Western half of the United States wcathor is cold and tho urospect Is j and will in time, change the status for. more snow. iBear canyon haa ot American citizenship. some fcot of snow. Thirty years ago the gulf stream Ttiu Balkan question has heon a: nightmare to Western Kuropo----for! more than a century. To get any- thing like an intelligent idea of this question it is necessary to briefly re- view the history of Europe for ttie past fifteen hundred years, and for the purpose of this article we will start with the downfall of the West- ern Roman Empire. The Roman world was repeating the oft told tale of the past, and sinking into the lifeless formalism of which Egypt was the type. In short, the Roman and Greecian rac- es had become impotent and decrep- it. The destiny of man lay not with them, but witti the younger race, for whom nil earlier civilization had but prepared the The Teutons, of the cold North- ern forests, had developed something (Continued on Page Five) DUKE OF THE ABRUZZI. Mist Katherine Elkina' Suitor May Be King of Albania. .J-- (I'nlrt Press Leased OLYMPA, .Inn. ssato Semite today voted UiL. plan ot Imth house-, of the k-gislnttiro rein- the to tiikinj; n junket trip to visit the various sfjito institutions. OLY.MPIA, Jan. the eenata concurs and tllo governor is willing, tho state legislature next Friday will be off for a six-day trip over the stata to visit all the state insti'.utiotis ask- ing appropriations. Following a debute yesterday that took practically all of the after- noon session, tlie house by a vote of 01 to 41 passed the uill introduced by Sims appropriating for a jun- ket. Tlie bill was ordered Immediate- ly transmitted to the senate. If pass- ed hy that body immediately and. signed by the governor without delay it would ho possible for the legisla- tors to start next Friday. The itinerary planned is from Olympia to Centralia. where tha needs of the So-uhwcst Washington, fair are to be considered; to Chehalla to inspect the state training school; Vancouver, to visit the Institution, for the deaf, dumb and blind and look over he plans for the proposed Pacific Highway bridge over tho Columbia river; to Walla Walla and the state penitentiary; to Lewiston, to investigate as to an appropriation for a bridge across the Columbia to .the Idaho side; to Pullman to inspect, needs of the Washington State Col- lege; thence to .Medical Lake, where. is located the state hospital for the insane; to the Cheney normal school at Cheney; to Xortti Yaklma to look into appropriations for ttie stato fair; to Kllensburg to Investigate I be wants ot the normal school; to the Orting Soldiers Home: thence to the Ilellingham state normal; to Sodro Woolloy to inspect the needs of the hospital for the insane; to Snotiomish and thep.co to Kverect to see as to the needs of ttie vocationl school planned; to the state reform- (Continued on Pago Eight)   

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