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Centralia Chronicle: Thursday, October 3, 1889 - Page 1

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   Centralia Chronicle (Newspaper) - October 3, 1889, Centralia, Washington                             VOL. 1. CENTRALIA, LEWIS COUNTY, WASHINGTON, THUESDAY, OCTOBEB, LAST WOBDS. Ths '.i' ty tol IP' rm- v'.'j a jm i u' 11 e w .1 -L l ujiedeiul Congress when the party caucus waved the whip and led by an ex-confederate, who be- lieved in slave labor, passed a bill which the then deinooralic President was pledged to sign and which, among other things, aholiehed'the duty upon lumber. Nothing but a narrow majority for the republicans in the federal senate pre- vented that from becom- ing a law. The democrats noiv. eeck to remove that troublesome, though small majority, in the senate, by electing two democratic senators from Washington. "Will you help them do it? We think not. Docs any man believe that if the dem- ocrats had succeeded in malting that law, that tho mills of Ocntralia would now be manufacturing lumber? Does any man believe that if that bill had reached the President the new mills that have been built in Centralin in the past year would now be here? Wo think not. Does any Lewis" county termer believe that if the tariff was removed from wheat, oats, potatoes, or hops he could obtain the prices he now obtains for his farm products? Does he believe that he could blot out the cities that protection has built up here and on the Sound, ship his produce to England, chip hig- goods back here, paying two profits and the freight both ways over a route ten thous- and miles in length, and make farming pny? We think not. Tl; highe the fa Liverpool. But they would rather do that than to work at Liverpool or Man- chester wages. It is better for the work- man to make a month, even if he ptiye for board than to work for u month even if he pays only (10 per month for hie living. For what good is it to attempt to ex- clude Chinese laborers if the lumber in Canada, made by Chinese labor, is to be Admitted here free of duty? In that case it would be better to have the Chi- nese here, for we would at leapt have the mille with us and there is some part of the work that Chinese) cannot do. For what good is it to invest money in hop fields if the great breweries of the country buy hops free of duly that were cultivated and picked in Germany by j labor that does not cost one-third it does in Washington territory It is a "dead open and chut" in that case that the hop fields must be abandoned or that wages must come down. The fact of it all is that tho democratic party is dominated by a class of fine gentlemen theoriy.ers who .never did n day's work for wages in their lives. The majority of the party is from tho Boulh, men were bi-ought up with slaves to tectioh. The tariffon calico, forinetajice, hjis indeed shut out foreign calico, but it built up fiiciories in this country v.-h'u are able to supply the whole demand at priced less than tho duty on the arti- cle. Thiatariffisnotataxand.it fur- nishes very little revenue. The tariff on sugar raises an enormous revenue, drawn from the pockets of every man who uses Hugar. It gives in return, unlike nearly every tariff tax, nothing to the country atlarge. Thetariffon nearly eve- ry other product has increased the produc- tion in this country and provided em- ployment to a great population. "Under the exorbitant tariff on sugar, retained by the Milla' bill for the benefit of a few Louisana democrats, has failed to at all increase the production of sugar and is not a protective duty in the national sense at all. It must come off, and we are satisfied that every thinkingrepubli- can in Washington is in favor of the ab- olition of the sugar duty. The sugar industry docs furnish employment to a small amount of labor, but it is of the servile, unskilled sort. light on the tariff with which the country never was favored be- fore. Republicans of Wabhington aie right in calling the democratic party a free trade party, since it piopoBes free trade in material, under which terms all the leading products of Washington are in- cluded. True, the democratic party has not proposed free trade for Eastern man- ufacturers and Southern but it has proposed free trade for elates like Oregon and Washington, whose products fall chiefly under the denomination of "raw materials." The people of Wash- ington, if we mistake see this very plainly, and they will show by their voles that they see it. The Bonnd-Up at Chelmlis. Saturday night was a veritable terror. They were brave men who went to Che- halie to attend the last grand .rally of the campaign in that city. Several car- riages, filled with republicans whose en- thusiasm could not be dampened, went out through the fearful night and joined the republicans of Chehalib'. Democrats and Monopoly. These latter turned out in force, with omw near depot. banners, transparencies and torches, amid the booming of canuon, and pa- raded in the first rainstorm of the seas- on. They are enthusiastic, those repub- licens of Chehaiie. The walla of the opera house were cov- The Centralia News, like a full-bloom appropriate banners and mot- demagogue that it is, repeals the stale cry: "The ivpublicnn party is the party toes, and the stage was a bower of flags. District Attorney Reynolds presided and CARDS. EO. E. RHODES, ATT'Y-At-LAW. 'NOTARY PUBLIC. Offlcc on West Front Street, Cciitraliu, M. T. OUnKY, ATTORNEY AT LAW, Centralin, V.'ofihingtou. Office near N.'P. depot. G. G. ICITEL. ,HS. T. 0. IIKISE. D CRSTBALIA, WASH. over Wi.ird'3 Drug Store. H. J. MILLER, -NOTARY PUBLIC. Office on JiOrth Tower avenue. TOIIX A. TAYLOR, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE NOTARY PUBLIC. OIUcc on Tower Ave., south of Jlain St. TANDRUM i LANDR05I ATT'YS-AT-LAW and REAL ESTATE AGENTS. CEXTEAIJA, WASH, 1YK. JAMES MISKLER, PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, OBice in MinUer'a block, South five. of monopoly, and ours, the democracy, ,lfter mu6ic excellent baud is the party form." Let us see about that: at this .f u'trcnchmcnt and re- j the 60ngj "jrnrching to was given with tremendous enthusiasm. The first speaker, Hon. Waller Thom- son, of Taeoma, took for his text tliis va n. RUSSELL, M. n. Qredunte of Trinity College, Dublin. Me Assistant Surgeon in Her Majesty's East India service. Office over A Pprutruc's Unaware store. of women niul chil- dren .1 specialty: alFO nl! chronic Bong, w hich he heard for the first time, list below and tell us if they are not and if they are not dem- ocrats CALVEN S. BKICE, Chairman of the Democratic Kiitionul Committee, Com-1 raid that if the soi'g could have been miiuder-in-Cliief of tho hist Democratic I sung throughout tho territory it would although the air. "Marching Through was familiar enough. He dent of Hie Standard Oil Compauy, the monopoly that uHliets this coun- try, is a Democrat. JIESUY li. PAYXK, the Iwodler mil- lionaire Senator from Ohio, who itfused to bo investigated for buying Legislators, if? a Democrat. land last Friday night. To be a state will be a great thing for us. Tiro republican senators and John L. Wilson in the house will be able lo rectify our demoralized postal service. They will be able to snciirc proper de- fenses for our miles of coast line j imd improvements lor out rivers and WILLIAM C. WHITNEY, Clove- h.Jrbore. Do you know that the satr.e Secretary of the Savy, owed his j expended on the Chehalis river promineiice to the fact that he is j annually expends on insig- 1'AYNE'S b-on-ii-.-law, and owns n block i nificant southern rivers, would make it ly 1- UNDERWOOD. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW. couth Tower aremie. CEXTRALIA, WASH. B. McIJOSALD, M. D. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. of Harvard University. lJUC sur- pof.ii u. S. A. Ollice i-ornyr V.'alimt stree: :iutl Tower avenue, cemralin, Washington. T11L T. r. fRASCIS, PHYSICIAN AND SUKGECN. From JCew York. IF now located in Contralto. ResMcn.jp In honso, on Main ytrcet. (in Tower ft venue, over Zimmcr it Foole's 5tore. Office hpnrs from 7 to 9 a. m., to 4 p. m. and 7 to'.' evenings. n T. SWASEY, ATTORXEY-AT-LAW. OHiepnrith I.. II. Norihey, Tov.-er avenue, Cen- trnlia, WiiKhin-ti'ii. of Standard Oil stock. navigable all the way from here to the CiEOUijE HEAK.ST, of California, j ocean. He denounced 'he unpatriotic a millionaire who bought his way into j speech cf Charles P. Yoorheis the prev- thc Senate, and wlnwo j ions nigiit advising democrats to vole started the agitation to have the Chinese let in again, "EO that Califor- nia fruM should lie is a Democrat. DAVIS, of Mississippi, who was the champion of slavery, the worst monopoly that ever crushed out free labor, and made it impossible in the .south for fifty years, is a Democrat, LINCOLN and GAKFIELD, two whom the Ucpublicans recently raised to the Presidency, were poor. I1ESHY. WILSON, who was elected vice-President a few- years ago, was at that lime so poor that he hud to borrow money to buy a decent suit of clothes to inaugurated in. The leaders of the party arc poor men com- pared with such men as Brice, who was against the new constitution and against statehood. He paid another tribute to that grand old leader, Ciov. Ferry, v.ho at the time of the Whitman county massacre sent word: "I am coming, with men and arms." When asked to put down a dis- turbance of Norther.) Pacific laborers clamoring for their nay, he said to the mcn contractors, "First pay your men, then come to inc." Eugene Sample, said Mr. Thompson, is not worthy to bo governor of thie new state. Shame to him that he should seek the position. .In the time of our nation's trouble lie was not true to the i do all the work, slaves who worked for nothing and who made it impossible for any man to work for wages without go- ing down to ther level of degradation, just MONOPOLISTS, as the Chinese would have done on this coast if they had not been checked. It is useless for the democrats to pay that r  for and was received with cheers A, F, ROSS, and Jewelry. JtKVAIUINO A Oontvaiia, Wash. NO OUODS MISHIjritKrtKN'.ri''li. C.-1SC.-I.I1E 15 lion- mskinj; il the SHOKTKST BEST AST) Ql'lCKKST. Dry XCL Dry Goods House EXCLUSIVE CBNTEALIA, Buchanan Block, Tower Avs. TACOMA GROCERY COMPANY, WHOLESALE GSOOERS, TACOMA, WASHIA'GTOJV. iinnuit: Cur lint1 FrisU-st Tlio n're rv viUlO'.ls can In- jcouix-.l in To East-Honmt JSverything Now. every piece of good? in the 'Hoiis.i fresh. Mrignt and Ni-w, right from the Eastern Market. We in- vite inspection of our Stock. We men- tion DB.SSS GOODS, 1'oreigu and Domestic, in all the. New No i Makes and Wears. The latest Styles ami Trimmings and .Buttons to match, lu HOUSE LINENS, We. have, a very Kiue Stock 'Mom-h iPav.iask, Unbleachc-l, Tiu'kev K. GOODS OF EVERY UKSCUIFTIOK, NovtluTii Taeilic Kailroad, o (lint ymir 
                            

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