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Centralia Chronicle Advertiser Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Centralia Chronicle Advertiser

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   Centralia Chronicle Advertiser (Newspaper) - August 30, 1935, Centralia, Washington                             "11 the Newa utt time read THE DAILY CHRONICLE DeUverea to your I5o per week- by tnau 25c per month. Phone COO, Getitralia Chronicle Advertiser NUMBER 115 CONTAINS ONLY. A PORTION OR THE NEWS AND ADVERTISING'OE THE CENTRALIA DAILY CHRONICLE CENTRALIA, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1935 If IVl Good Bargain you'll find It In the "Advertiser" IV- X The low tide in ere production appears definitely to have turn- cd, according to reports rfom the Crop Reporters of the United States Department of Agriculture More eggs were laid per 100 hens Jn their flocks or, Awust l than is usual at that date, and many more than last year, when pro- duction was unusually small ow- ing to the severe drought then prevailing. The shortage in num- ber of foyers ls not 35 marlced as it was earlier in the year, thougl-; numbers are slill much be- low the level of recent years. The total production of eggs in- dicated, by layings per farm flock on August 1, although about 10 per cent below the 5-year August 1 average production, was about 9 per cent greater than the. ex- irancly small production on that date last year. As the returns from crop Reports do not in- clude enough reports from com- mercial producers to measure ac- curately the trend of production by commercial nocks, the total production may fce somewhat greater or less than indicated. The receipts of eggs at 4 prin- cipal eastern and central mar- kets for the week ending August 3 were 12 per cent greater t than for the same week last year. Because of the small 'production eggs last year in. the central states, owing to drought, the greatest increase in. production is shown in that area. The west north central states show a gain in production of eggs per hen on August 1 of 30 per cent, the south central of 17 per cent, and east north central of 12 per cent over the August 1 figures of last year, in eggs laid per 100 hens. The number of layers reported on August 1 was 4 .per cent less this year than last, while in July it was 6 per cent and in January 8 cent .less than, a i year earlier. That farmers are marketing fewer layers is indicat- by the decreased receipts of flresscd poultry at the Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Chi- Sun in a Studio! Actress Aghast Imagine traveling 6000 miles all the way from London to Hollywood to find the sun! That's what Cicely Courtneidgc, famous British actress, did, and she. found. Uncle Sol peeping right into her dressing room. Just look at her, above, drink- ing in the. sunshine that 'sue says'she.never.did see once she got into a British studio. cago markets, which for the week ending August 3 were' about 20 per cent' less than for the cor- responding week last year when more layers were being marketed. For the first seven months of this year, receipts of poultry at these markets were almost 20 per- cent less than for the same months in 1934. The' reported number of eggs laid per 100 hens on August 1 was 38.3. compared with a 5-year average of 37.3, and was 14 per cent greater than the extremely small production of 33.5 eggs per 100 hens on August 1 last year. CHAMPION PICKED A record, at least for Whatcom county, is claimed for Nathalia Smith, 16-year-old Bellinteham. girl, who picked 455 pounds of beans in eight hours on. a farm near Lawrence. She had only one week's experience in this work. The average bean pickers harvest about 200 pounds a day. _______ Fall planting is at hand. Only about one-third of all garden own- ers do fall planting. There is no fever at this season to match the spring garden fever. The impulse to dig sfecms to be lacking. Only foresight, planning and knowledge of the advantages of fall planting inspire the gardener who does it, and these affect only the minority. Fall work may be divided into two which can be done onlyi in the fall and things which may bfi done now or next spring. In the former class come the planting of hardy bulbs and peonies. In the latter class are lawn-making, the planting of trees, shrubs and perennials, and the sowing of, nome- flower seeds.- Many of the operations which are optional in the fall should be done then rather than in the spring because the fall has advantages. Lawns are better made in the fall; many perennials, esptecially the iris- es, do better when, planted then. Hardy shrubs as a rule will grow much better next year if they have spent the winter in your garden rather than a storage shed, as many nursery shrubs must do. Trees get a better start with fall planting, with a few exceptions. And in general, any- work which can be done in the fall tequally as well as in the spring should be done now because spring has its own tasks which will take all the time one has., arid it is well to re- lieve the spring rush wherever possible. Hardy bulbs which must be planted in the fall include tulips, narcissi, hyacinths, chionodoxas, eryhhroniums, fritillerias, ixias, oxalis, muscari, scillas, snow- drops, snowflakes and bulbous irises. Hardy lilies may be planted in the fall, or, if cold storage bulbs are obtained, in the spring. Tulips are planted in greatest numbers, and the first shipments arrive in this country- about Sep- tember 1 from Holland. OUR WILL The Life Story of Will Rogers By SCOTT CUNNINGHAM The material for Scott Ciin- "OUR was collected from personal contact with the man, irnm interviews wifch his relatives and friends, and from reading practically everything ever written 'by him or about him. 3D-. Cunning- ham devoted two years almost exclusively to this task, and interviewed at least a hundred of Mr. Rogers' friends and childhood associates. If the Oolden Rule were a, one way street more people would travel it. AUGUST 31st Is the Deadline FREE WOOD with the genuine ESTATE HEATROLA If you're going to need a new heater this Fall, don't fail to look into this opportunity. There are at least three reasons why it will pay you to place your order this month: (1) You'll be sure of getting the model you want- when you want it. (2) You'll be protected against any price advance. (3) You'll get a supply of wood FREE. CASH ISN'T NECESSARY Just a small deposit now will reserve your Heatrola at to- day's' price, assure you of your share of the wood. Regular payments do not start until the Heatrola is installed in your home (you set the date) and the Free 'Wood is in your bin. There's only One Heatrola Estate builds sell it. For 15 years it has led in sales by a wide margin. See the 193S Estate Wood Hcalrolas. You'll he delighted with their porcelain-enameled beauty, no less than with their remark- able heating power and fuel economy. Two sizes- -to fit most homes, most budfiets. HURRY! If you can't get in to the store by Aufrift 31st, telephone and invite us ts call at your home. First Installment: THE GREAT EVENT Will Rogers was born Tuesday night, November 4, 1879, in a log house in a valley {our miles, east of Oologah, Indian Territory.' He was nine thirty-seconds (or a little more than one fourth) Cherokee Indian, and Irish and Welsh, The Rogers surname is of Nor- man-French derivation. Sometime jetween 1642 ancf 1646. members of this family moved from Eng- .and to Ireland. Will Rogers' jreat great grandfather, Robert Hogers, was born In Ireland, came ;o western Virginia about 1800 ;o trade with the Indians, and married the daughter of another Irish adventurer, Thomas Cordcry. whose wife was a full-blood Chero- kee. Their fourth child Robert Jr.. married a one-eighth Chero- kee, and had moved to the Indian Territory in '39 when the future father of Will Rogers was born, according to Emmet Starr, author of the History of the Cherokee Indians, published by the Warden lompany of Oklahoma City in 1921. Will Rogers' first and biggest, hero was his father. "Clem" Rogers had a hard youth, In the rough country of the Cherokee nation, and was "on his running a creek-side trading post, at 17. He had only two negro slaves to help him handle his Osage customers when they grew obstreperous. At 20 he married Mary Schrimsher, the future mother of Will Rogers, a quarter Cherokee herself, and took her back to his lonely post. Then suddenly he was caught Up in tlie Civil war. As a captain WILL. ROGERS he grew strong enough he pulled out a drawer from the bottom of the bureau, and stood on it. He daubed himself with powder until he looked like a baker. When his mother found him and Jerked him away he complained, "But I got to have some put- on ya'-face. I GOT to." As a man..when he got into the theatre, he had access to all the "pul-nn- ya'-faee" used it. he wanted, and never (Continued on TRADE IN YOUR OLD HEATER PAY AS YOU ENJOY IT Second Installment LEARNS ABOUT ROPING In rearing Willie and keeping him out of trouble, Mrs. Rogers had the help of a colored cook, Rhoda, and the cook's married daughter, Babe Walker. Babe's husband, Dan, taught the boy the first he knew about roping. "Naw, now, Willie. That ain't the way to do it. Hold yo1 rope and he would dcmon- stckte. "Try it ag'in." Willie did. He was somewhat proficient whan Mrs. Charley Rob- inson, or Talala, came one day irT the "Confederate army, he led j to see the Rogers' new baby-grand a charge, on foot, in the battle of Cabin Creek, Indian Territory. He had to start from scratch after the South's surrender, and hauled wagon-freight for five years to make the money with which to start as a rancher. Tough times make tough men. Clem Rogers was serious, and sometimes crabby. He was mighty plain-spoken, too, but he was nev- er regarded as a "bad nev- er wore a gun. He was generous, and if a poor family got a present of a hog, or some flour, it prob- ably came from him. In 1870 Clem Rogers moved to the spot in the Verdigris Valley where Will was later to be born. After two years a two-story log house was erected. Clem was a man of relative wealth and a pow- er in Cherokee politics in 1879, when his wife told him their I sixth child was on the way. A. J. Lane, country doctor, brought Will Rogers into the world in that log house on the Verdigris river-bank. After Will was born, he had to he fed on a bottle. He was named William Penn Adair Rogers, after a Che- rokee leader. His mother wanted him to be a Methodist preacher. Willie, as the youngster was called, had three sisters and a brother when he was bom, but his fifteen-year-old brother died ol typhoid when Willie was still on his bottle. That left him the only toy in a. family of girls, a fact that was to have bearing in the shaping of his sensitive but as- sertive character. The girl's names were Sallic, Maude and May. To outrage his wile and daugh- ters. Clem Rogers liked to take Willie's bottle away from him and then hear him utter harmless cuss words his father had taught him. "Stop that. Clem the toy's mother would order. "Why, it'd make you sick to What Mrs. Rogers nated most was that her hut-band usually picked times when there was 'com- pany" present to start this act. Women neighbors were always calling on her, for she was popu- lar with them. They liked her funny stories and her drv wit. As in the case of Mark Twain, it was from his mother that Will derived much of his sense of hu- mor. She was religious, however, in spite of her levity. Clem's work- ins on Sunday was a thing that always hurt her. Talk as she might, he persisted in it. All she could prevail upon him to do was to "ask the blessing" at the table. To please her Clem would do so. and then, during the meal, swear like n sailor! Willie outgrew his "cusswords" with the help of his mother. And then ho learned to walk. What havoc was wrought in the Rogers riinchl'.oiisc when Willie was able to ito prowling about! What ho liked best to explore wn.s his slsfr Salllc's box of cos mclics. Sallle, now eighteen and through school, was teaching. lie was too short to reach the box if he Mood on the floor, SO ns An Industry that had its origin in the Puyallup valley 12 years ago is now at its high point for the year. It Is the production of creeping bent grass seed. Harvest- ing of this seed is now on. The industry was started by M. E. McCallam, then an agronomist at the western Washington cxiicri- ment station, and Mead Murray, a teacher in the pnyallup high .school. They cultivated a bent gross growing along the Oregon coast and called Seaside hcnt. Now pounds of bent grass seed are produced in Wash- ington and Oregon annually, and this seed is sold for golf greens and lawns all over the nation. McCallalm and Murray have 350 acres of bent grass growing (it Puyallup, Bellingham and South Bend, and 40 men are now cutting .his grass by hand. It will be dried nd threshed next month. Dr. C. IT. Piper, Washington, D. then chairman of the greens committee of the United States Golf association, first suggested hat the native bent grasses of Washington and Oregon should be cultivated. ELECT LECTURER At the last meeting or the Violet Prairie Grange, in south- ern Thurston county, Mrs. Pave Walker was elected lecturer to succeed Harold Monday. The latter resigned to enter the state college at Pullman this fall. Widow's Might TO ERECT HATCHERY The Washington Co-operative Chick association will soon begin erection of a modem new hatch- ery in Vancouver. Cost will be GRANGE INCORPORATES Tho black widow spider had the advantage when this picture was taken nt Fresno, Calif., with the mouse still very much alive but hopelessly enmeshed. After this picture was taken an oil worker killed both the mouse and spider. The South Bay Canning club made the best record in competi- tion among 4-H, groups, and ti-.c Hays club among homemakers at the annual Thurston county Har- vest Festival held Thursday at Chambers Prairie hall, C. A. Svinth, county has nn- nounced after a check of rccorth. Ranking of clubs took inio ron- ideration numerical size nf cl'itw as well as .'icorc'l in the various The festival was decliircr; nil outstanding success because cl the fine exhibits made, even though no cash awards were up. and be- cause of the fine interest shown, Svinth said. The Thursday even- ing program, attracted an overflow crowd. In the 4-H division South Buy Canning club won 130 wi'li nine members, an Rochester Gar- den club took second with. 12-1 points made by nine members. In the homcmakers' diviri'm Hays club won 102 points with 13 members. McKinley was second and Friendly Grove third. Two judging contests not prn- vtously announced fol- lows: Garden procurer Wrlb, Rochester, first; Alum Sinclair Schneider's Prairie, second, and Glenn Lorang, Rochester, Home Fred- crick, Nisqually, first, and Agivs Grimm, South Bay, and Helen Frederick, Nisqually, tied for cond. Morion Grange No. 1066, recently] organized, has filed articles of in- corporation with the Lewis counts auditor. L. B. Tully is master of the Grange, and W. E. Campion is secretary. IN THIS ISSUE OF THE Chronicle Advertiser you will find many special school offerings for coming week, advertised by Centralia merchants, who invite you to come and shop with them. Your every school need has been anticipated and you will find it not only interesting but profitable to visit their stores. FAIL Thlngs for the School Girl DRESSES COATS SUITS SKIRTS BLOUSES SWEATERS as well as a complete line of Lingerie, and Foun- dation Car mcnls and hose. In Our New Location 317 N. Tower Ave. Saturday, August 31 WE invite 'you visit our new store which we arc opening Saturday with a wonderfully complete stock in the new Fair modes. Whether you plan on buying now or later, we want you to come in and sec these wonderful creations priced lo fit any purse. ch note llcctions There's for fall an interesting draping of fine materials in new colors. It's a timely note, a mode in keeping with the richest season of the year. Inspired by the wealth of periods in the past, the rare detail that marked early Italy, the grace that belonged to early Greece, the charm of the richest Eastern coun- tries, these collections bring you the smartest adaptations of New York, Paris and Hollywood designers. The new materials we are showing in- clude Oatmeal Crepes, Alpaca Sheers and Silk Rabbit Cloth in dresses; Cre- peon, Velvets, Cellophane Crepes and Satins in the Evening dresses, and Jac- quard for coals. I BOYNTON'S SHOP New Location 317 N. Tower Avenue Centralia   

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