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Centralia Chronicle Advertiser Newspaper Archive: August 23, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Centralia Chronicle Advertiser

Location: Centralia, Washington

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   Centralia Chronicle Advertiser (Newspaper) - August 23, 1935, Centralia, Washington                             the tlme read THE DAILY CHRONICLE DeUverea to your home for ue per week- W 25o per month. Phone COO, Centralia Chronicle Advertiser NUMBER 114 CONTAINS ONLY A PORTION OF" THE NEWS AND ADVERTISING OE THE CENTRALIA DAILY CHRONICLE CENTRAUA, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1935 If it'c Good Bargain you'll find It In the "Advertiser" The time Is approaching Vork on lawns and the seeding of new. lawns can be clone under more favorable conditions than at any (season. Pine lawn grasses all to stop growth in midsummer and their energy revives as fall ap- proaches. This is believed to. be governed by the length of the day- light. Prom late August to the first of October, the earlier the better, is :the most favorable time for the germination of lawn grass seed and the establishment of seedling plants. The growth urge is at its maximum, the weather is cooler, with more plentiful moisture, and with shortening days there is an apparent effort on the part of the plants to achieve maximum strength in preparation for the The earlier seed is sown, the longer seedling plants have to grow in this favorable period be- fore the ground freezes. After Oc- 1 there is considerable haz- ard due to the possibility that freezing will come when the seed- ling plants are too young to stand it. Seeding should never be de- layed so long unless it Is impos- sible to sow earlier. Seed sown on established lawns repair purposes at this season .requires more careful treatment in the early spring. There must be assurance that the seed Is covered with earth, since other- wise it is likely to wash off the bare spots. Loosen the soil in> the bare places, sprinkle on the seed and rake it in, or If seed is broad- cast generally over the lawn it should be accompanied'by a light top dressing. This should be pre- pared of sifted soil, which may be mixed with a complete plant food. should not exceed a quarter of an inch in depth when spread over the lawn and should be care- fully and washed .off. the aves. Throughout the cold-wealher states of the United States, Ken- tucky blue grass Is considered very satisfactory. It is sown us- ually in a mixture which includes considerable red top. and some white clover and bent. Red top Is a fine lawn grass which germ- ates more quickly than blue grass and becomes easily, but it is not so permanent. It Is used as a nurse crop to the blue grass, which, while slower in germ- Diva Relearning Her Do-Re-Mi's Cheerful after an operation for removal of a goiter which for 15 years half-blocked her throat, Mme. Amelita Galll-CurcI, pictured above with her nurse In a Chicago hospital, is learning to sing all over again. In three months, the internationally famous singer topes to accustom herself to control the air volume doubled by tha absence ot the growth she had .fondly termed her "potato." mating and taking hold, will fin- ally come to dominate in the per- manent lawn. White clover thick- ens, the turf and enriches the soil. It is a good plan for gardeners to have a ready supply of good grass seed for the lat summer and fall reseeding; and where new lawns are to be made, a supply of plant food will also be needed. Skookumchuck MTs. J. c. Nelson and Mrs. J. L. Graham of Tenino attended the Bucoda Booster club picnic at Offut lake last Tuesday. Mi's. Alta Childefs of Missoula, Mont., is spending several weeks with Mrs. M. C. Thompson. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Thomp- son of Onalaska, visited Satur- day afternoon with Mrs, Mrs. J. C. Nelson. Maybe the idea is to get the people to thinking in mills, so they will get their minds off bil- lions. SUCCULENT FEED Garden beets, carrots and man- gles can be used as a succulent feed to supplement winter dairy rations and can be quite easily stored, points out the state col- large dairy department. Chopped garddn beets and carrots can be fed at the rate of about 40 pounds a day. Mangles, containing a low- er percentage of dry matter, may be fed at ttte rate of 45 to 50 pounds a day. And dry root crop should: be supplemented with a legume hay. High producing cows also should receive grain. BERRY CROP HEAVY Soon the picking of the 1935 wild evergreen blackberry crop will be In full swing In Lewis and other counties. T4ie price in this section will be two cents per pound delivered. In Snohomish tlie quotation Is 13-4 cents. The crop la a bumper one. Booster Night is a nationwide Grange event instituted by the Na- tional Grange. Eight thousand Granges In the United States will hold meetings on that night-September 30. A network of cars will be travel- ing toward Grange halls in all parts of the United States at one time. If it were possible to look down upon, all of the communities represented by Granges, what a picture it would make! Cars filled with families would be seen leav- ing their homes headed for Grange halls. Not only Grange members, but. their neighbors also are includ- ed to this picture. On this night set every Granger and his neighbor are urged to 'hear and take part in a well-rounded Grange program. In this state 470 such meetings will be held. In the well rounded program of the Grange, its legis- lative, cooperative, ritualistic, edu- cational, home, community, wel- juvenile and other features will be set forth. Those outside of Grange will get an idea of Grange value and ser- vice today. Medals are to be awarded by the National Orange for the best five Booster niijht programs in the na- tion, and two prizes in each state, one for Granges with a member- ship of under 200 members and one for over 200. A score card and detailed information will be sent each Grange lecturer early in Sep- tember by the National Grange. Each Grange hall will look its best. There will be decorating, pub- licity, membership attendance, greeting and refreshment commit- tees especially for this event. Ar- rangements for a special officers' drill, flag salute and other such features will be effective. Booster Night is the one special night when a neighboring Grange is not Invited, for each Grange is host to is own neighborhood population. The home community is the guest of honor. Old members will be invited to be resinstated and new ones so- licited. Each lecturer and committee will check over his feature program to make it the best of the year. Spe- :ial music by the best talent, short plays, pageants, tableaux, speaking, the very best procurable will be had for this big night. Dapper Sleuth Wins Promotion Save From to and Buy Your Circulator Now! For a limited time we are offering some splendid values in our entire line of circulators. Pictured here we show this wood and coal combination circulator with its two-tone walnut finish. It is unusually attrac- tive in appearance and we believe one of the finest built circulators we have ever shown. Built of sturdy all cast iron interior and with heavy duplex grates it will give long years of satisfactory service at low operating cost. Priced 95 The Heater Beautiful MX. VERNON ALL-WOOD CIRCULATORS This circulator (wood only) has a beautiful two-tone wal- nut finish, is unusually attractive in appearance. A very sturdy construction with an all cast interior lining. Guaran- teed to give long years of satisfactory service. Trade in your old stove as part payment on one of these modern healers. Priced at 39 75 Remember, you can save from to if you make your choice now. A small deposit will hold one for you until you are ready. Charlet's Furniture Co. "Quality Furniture For Leu" Heads Teachers of Nation Her slogan, "Education must streamline itself tor bitter per- formance." Miss Agnes Samuel- son ot Des Moines, sbown here after her election as president ot the National Education As- sociation, will direct activities of more than educa- tors for tlie coming year. The new teachers' chief, named at the Denver convention, now is Iowa's superintendent ot public instruction. Beau Brunimel ot tlie U. S. Secret Service in tlie days whon lie 'was bodyguard for John Coolidge at Amherst Col- lege, Kusscll C. has 'worked Ins way to a high position In his profession, lie just has been named assistant chief of the White House secret, service. A possible Increase of Income for farmers of Western WashlnUm lies in the practicability of ship- ping flowers by air express to destinations ns far ns the middle west, according to E. B. Slookey bulb grower living near Olympla. Stookey believes thai by this practice Washington's flower mar- ket can be greutly extended. Stookey also made another dis- covery, that of obtaining flowers in 30 days. This Is accomplished by placing Uie bulbs in a bowl with rocks and water, tlie same as Chinese lilies are handled. "At Christmas time we had flowers which were produced in 30 said Stookey. "The bulbs had been cured about the last of September, after which they were placed In cold storage in a 'sharp' or cool room Jus! above freezing. Last year bulbs held in this manner until the last of January produced blos- soms in 20 days. "For long distance shipping of flowers, we pick In the tight bud and generally ship by express. It is surprising how they come out and how they last after reaching their destination. "Western Washington soils and climatic conditions are second to none for the production 'A hardy narcissus and daffodil Through the efficient work of inspectors of our state depart- ment of Agriculture we have re- duced insect and disease pests to a minimum.' Stookey recommends treating all bulbs by the hot water treat- incut to kill bulb fly and tode or pel On Stooke.y's farm tlits Is accomplished by us- ing four 1000-watt, electric Insert heaters in a wooden lank. These heaters are wired .i.u one, uuy number, can bt1 turned on. When the water reaches 112 decrees I1'. one tray of bulbs i.s Inserted in the water bath. Tills reduces tlie temperature about 1 degree. When It again readies 11U decrees p. another tray of ijhicfd in the. tank, uhd thLs tinned iinlll the tank Is lull Each basket of bulbs is left Li the water lor three hours at a temperature of 110'- decrees F. to 111 degrees F. "I have found the bulbs are not Injured at in Stookey said, "provided they lire not held ut this temii'i.'nitiire too long." In the wooden tnnk Is nn tifjl- Lator, driver, by an electric motor, which keeps tilt" water in circu- lation. Consequently, the water temperature is the same in all parts of the tank 4-H MINT CHICKENS SHIPPED Wayside Poultry farm, Kiinl. lias snipped 15 splendidly bred Rhode Island Hed to Japan. This is the second .shipment of these birds to the Japanese gov- ernment by the firm named. TO DISPLAY FLOWERS p-on.-, income from 1934 production, from rental and benefit payments by the gover- rnent and from, the forced .sale of livestock filets estimated ai by the Bureau of Agricultural Economic-; in its final summary or farm income for that year. 'Hiis i.s an increa.se of nearly over the 1933 income, of and an in- crea.se of nearly over the 1932 income of nt tlie bottom of the. depression. The puak of income since 1920 war, in 1929 when the total was in 1929 when the total was Gross income from production the value of farm, prod- ucts gro'ATi for sale, plus the val- ue ol product.1; consumed by fam- ilies on farms where the products were grown. Cash iucams from production and government payments was in 1934, compared with in 193, and in 1032. Benefit payments amounted to in 1934, and to in 1933. Flower lovers are turning their attention to the floral show to be staged at Handle tomorrow. Mossyrock, Morton and the new- ly organized Packwood garden circles will join with lUahee cir- cle of Randle in making it a success. The dahlia will be the featured flower, but others, in- clnuding gladioli, will also be en- tered for competition. HARVEST CUCUMBERS The Snohomish County Fruit Growers' association is harvest- ing 30 acres of cucumbers. A nationally known company is packing the crop. Given suffi- cient water no part of the world excels western Washington for this crop. Starting as an experiment this year in 10 counties, results of hatching pheasant eggs under do- mestic hens by boys' 4-H clubs are encouraging, Henry M. Walker, state agent for 4-H club work for the state extension; service, says. Walker believes that when all reports axe in it will be determ- ined that the experiment was suc- cessful enough to warrant contin- uing it next year. This is the first year that an attempt has been made In this state in the opem. field method of rearing game birds as a part ot the 4-H club program. Hggs were received from Bay James, state game department director, and sent out to 84 members of game bird clubs in Franklin, Yakima, Walla Walla, Columbia, Whitman, Spo- kane, Kittitas, Lewis, Cowlitz and Clark counties. The young birds were to be kept by the club mem- bers for 12 weeks and then, turn- ed back to the game, department for distribution. It has not yet been learned whether they will be released in the counties in which they were hatched, or whether they will be turned loose before or after the 1935 hunting season. The game department has agreed to pay club members 75 cents a bird for all they accept. The record of the Clark coun- ty club is interesting. There are seven boys in the club and they received a total of 350 eggs. Ac- cording to latest reports, from this number of eggs there are 172 liv- ing birds. Most of the loss which was sustained occurred before the eggs were hatched. Only ten birds were last after hatching. Some of the eggs were broken by the hen, and in some cases the hen left the eggs before they were hatched. FALL TERM opens TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1935 Write for Catalog DAY andNIGHT SCHOOL Centralia Business College R. J. Fletcher, Pret. Main at Pearl Long Brushed Mohair! Twin Sets Boyi' DOUBLE Value! Smart-looking talon slide fastener coat with slash' pockets! Sleeveless crew neck slipover to match! Solid colors. Sizes 8 to 16. FINE OXFORDS to 2 Rugged stitch- down shoe for boys and girls. An outstanding value for you I Misses' ONE-STRAPS 10 2 Dressy, sturdy stitchdowns. Fully lined. Spe- cial soles. Bob- ber heels. Boys' 32 All Wool Melton Cossacks tyith Talon Side-Fastener! Perfect for school and every! day wearl Large sport collar, two muff pockets, side 6-181 Warm, comfortable and long-wearing! Buy now! Save! OXFORDS Sturdy Blucheri Broad toes for active growing feet. Tough com- position soles. Sizes TRUE BLUE SHIRTS for 69- Tail color per- eata, broad, cloths, colon, Plata and fan- cies. "6 to "14 !i Children's Summer HALF SOCKS Cool! Sturdy! 15 pair Plain, striped mercerized! Rayon plaited', fancy and picot tops. White, tan, smurt pastels. 5 to 8'-i Boys' and Young Men's SLACKS Fine Quality! Plain slacks or pleated F a i r- way models in a assort- ment of pat- terns, colors! B o y 5' 6-17, young men's 29- 361 They're hits. WELT OXFORDS Townzraft Bal style with wing tips and perforated trim. Either brown or black. Size 6-11. Boys9 Canvas SHOES for School 69' Penney's "Bo- zos" give long 'ear with spring in every step. Odorless insole. Women's trim All Wool Cossack Jackets Talon Slide Fastener Front! A mannish sort of jacket for outdoors wearl Panel front, plain back style, with button sleeves, larRC snort collnr, two warm muff pockets.. 10 to 20. PENNEY COMPANY,   

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