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Centralia Chronicle Advertiser Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Centralia Chronicle Advertiser

Location: Centralia, Washington

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   Centralia Chronicle Advertiser (Newspaper) - July 19, 1935, Centralia, Washington                             tat all the News m time read THE DAILY CHRONICLE Delivered to your home daily for 15c per by mall 25c per month. Phone 600, Ctntralia Centralia Chronicle Advertiser NUMBER 109 CONTAINS ONLY A PORTION OF THE NEWS AND ADVERTISING OF. THE CENTRALIA DAILY CHRONICLE CENTRALIA, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JULY 19, 1935 It It'i Good Bargain you'll find It In the "Advertiser" TESTS Jt IDE WASHINGTON STATE COL- LEGE, Pullman, July re- gional soil conservation grass and forage nurseries and the forage crops work of the agricultural ex- periment station, State College of Washington, were inspected today by P. V. Cnrdon, the new chief of the office of forage crops of the United States Department of Agri- culture, and Harry A. Sphoth, as- souiatc agronomist of the division of forage crops. Cardon formerly was dlruutor of the Utah, agricultural e.-.periment station, mpre recently was regional director of the'Land Planning di- vision of.the AAA for the Pacific Southwest, and assumed his new duties vfith the Department of Agriculture July 1. According to Dean E. C. Johnson of the Washington experiment sta- tion, the new erosion control nurs- eries will he used lo study grasses and other plants that are native to the Pacific Northwest and that have been introduced from Asia and other foreign countries for their usefulness as forage and the control of erosion in tfie Palous1! and adjacent areas and to facili- tate the selection, improvement, and seed increase of plants' especially promising for these purposes. The ,ECW nurseries are a coop- erative undertaking between the .soil conservation service, the office of forafec crops of the U. S. D. A., and experiment stations of the Pacific Northwest. CENTRALIA TO BE HOST AT ANOTHER CELEBRATION i STOCK PRICES UP NEW YORK. July industry issues, backward for some lime, came to the front in today's stock market. Quiet buying lifted the steels, rails and equipments .substantially. The close .was firm. Transfers approximated shares. Pasture lands I hut are properly prepared, fertilized according to liiml in Washington furnishes BO per cent, of the feed consumed by livestock. The dairy man should capitaliz" on tuis great natural resource of Washington, says Ellington. INSPECTS MARKETS John Amionen, prominent VV lock poultrynmn, who is it diret: of tiie Washington Co-operal soil requirements, seeded to the most suitable grasses and prop-1 Egg and Poultry association. 1 crly Brazed will produce more j f Vorlc citv Ellington', bend' of the' ccpiirtinenl j rcpiTM'llt, the on a lour of A graphic picture of improving agricultural conditions in the Pa-' cific. Northwest is shown by the Increase in sales of acquired farm id I property by the Federal Land will bank of for the six- of dairy husbandry at Washington State College. Pasture grilses are prac.tical'y balanced ration for milk proriin lion. It, has been authoritative slated Hint 94 per cent, of t.l of New Zealand arc grow on crass lands and that the gra l.lns he will attend the National P.iillvy iirlM'ili.1 lo be held at Cor- I university this week. An- noni'" vlsil month period ending- June 30. The. number of farms disposed of during the first six months of 193n. compared with a similar per- iod last, year, r.hows a decided increase in number of units .-old. Sale volume in 1935 totalled ironlliui'Ml on Four) Scenes like those pictured above will be re-enacted here August 2. 3 and 4 during the annual Pioneer Days. At the upper left is Johnny Glami, of Cheyenne, riding "No upper center, Kay Wchardson and Miss Ardith Kern: upper right. Chief .lob Charlie ot the Yakima Indian tribe; lower left, entry of H. L. Shaw of Puyallup in last year's parade; lower right, parade entry of Grant Hodge post. American Legion. Free Delivery DRUGS WITH A REPUTATION 856 Mkt. Street Chehalis Ph. 88 Shop at Both Stores RUB ALCOHOL, pint 2 for WITCH HAZEL, 12 oz. JUNIS CREAM, 50c size LUX SOAP, 4 bars EPSOM SALTS, 5 Ibs. 29c 37c 29c 39c 25c 29c LUNCH KITS, complete 3 for 21c MINERAL OIL, quart V5c KENWOOD DOG FOOD, 1 lb......................... PALMOLIVE SOAP, 6 bars 25e MILK OF MAGNESIA, pint.................................. 39c OVALTINE, size......................................... 59c PSYLLIUM SEED, lb........................................... 23c AGAR AGAR, cut or whole, lb................. 98c RINSO, large 20V2c VELVET or P. A. TOBACCO, lb....................... 74c PRCTECT YOUR HANDS RUBBER THE SftME QUALITY GLOVES AS ARE USED IN HOSPITALS 19c PAIR In its first forecast of this year's com crop, the department of agriculture has placed indicated production at .bushels, based on July 1 conditions. Last year's crop totaled bushels. The 1923-32 ten jear average production was The indicated wheat crop (winter and spring is bushels, compared with bushels indicated a month ago, last year and 000, the ten year average. The indicated winter wheat crop is 458.091.00n bushels, compared with 441.494.000 a month ago. 034.000 last year and the ten year average. All wheat production as an pared, with 7.086.000 last year and the 10 year average. All other spring wheat produc- tion is indicated as bu- shels, compared with last year and the 10 year average. Indicated production of oats is bushels, compared with list year and 000, the 10 year average. The indicated production this year of other important crops and their production last year include: apples, bushels and 855.000; peaches, bushels, and pears. bu- shels, and 23.474.000: grapes. 2.- 150.000 Ions, and potatoes, bushels, and TO EXHIBIT STOCK EU CARB Tooth Free Albums The ncuesf develop- ment in a modern, improved demilrice. 1.00 r ountain Syringe P. X. Antiseptic L'-igHt-picture album free with each roll of films METAL UTILITY BOXES 14 OUNCES OF VERY HANDY FOR TIIE OFFICE, THE HOME AND THE SHOP A blend of line hurley __ tobacco Ask for PLANTER'S PRIDE MADAM'S BEST FRIEND The finest thing for WHY WOIIKY AND 1'RKT WHEN NATURE FAILS YOU? PERIODIC DEM.YR, dno lo colds, nervous "train or other ummlurnl causes, liavo been quickly anil easily for Iliciisinds of modern women by CKI1KNK. An entirely scientific, douche. It is no longer ncees- sary to resart (o old-fashioned, questionable methods. The cfficncy and safi-lj of CEHENK have been proved. There is nothing else like US. .l.ilcnl j DIOXOGEN CREAM IS bushels. indicated compared with an estimate of I inn 23'J.OOO.OOO a month ngo, 91.435.000 produced last year, and the 10 year average. Durum wheat, production is in- dicated as bushels, corn- On page 5 in the Advertiser to- day is a full-page advertisement giving details of nominations of girls to compete in the Centralia Pioneer Days Queen contest, Aug- ust 2, 3 and 4. The nominating ballot on that page, properly filled in and deposited in the ballot boxes of the Chamber of Commerce or Daily Chronicle offices in Cen- tralia, starts your favorite with 1 000 votes. The voting ballot below is the ballot which will appear daily in the Centralia Daily Chronicle and the contestant turning In the most ballots will automatically become Queen of the pioneer Days Cele- bration. The next two closest will ID Princesses. This ballot is good additional to the credited on the nomination ballot. Collect as many of these ballots from your relatives, friends and Classes have been provided for Ayrshire calves and yearlings in 4-H division of the Western Washington fair, September 16-21. A. O. Burham, Rainier. Prices will be the same as for other breeds. The Ayrshire Breed- ers' association, of Brandon, Ver- irovide additional awards f S3 each to any boy or Rirl ex- hibiting one or more calves, pro- vided there are at least three calves in the class and the cnlf or calves are registered In tlr; name of the club boy or sir'- acquaintances as you can and cast them for your favorite. The con- test closes Wednesday noon, July 31st. BUTTER PRICES DROP WASHINGTON STATE LEGE, Pullman, July 19- prices have continued the downward trend that sUvted in April, according to the weekly re- view of markets Issued the agricultural extension servirr There have been occasional short periods of recovery, but at prac- tically all times certain eloironts of weakness have been evicicn'. During early July the 2301-cent wholesale price of 92 score buttei at New York was lower than on the same date of any recent yea: except 1932. Milk flow is decreas- ing, but holding up fairly wtl! and averaging above last year. Paddle your canoe, outboard mo- tor, skiff, sail or rowboal into UK; current of the Want Ad stream. It's tin: only ore that flows both carries away what you don't want and brings back '.vliat you cas'.i. CLIP THIS BALLOT gr Pioneer Days Queen Contest VOTING BALLOT Good For 100 Voles caul 100 votes lor: in bullet box nt cither Chamber of Commerce or Daily Cjronlole offices, Ccntrnlin, Wash. CENTRALIA PIONEER DAYS Friday Saturday Sunday August 2, 3, 4 THREE BIG DAYS PARADE PICNIC RODEO PAGEANT NIGHT SHOW WHISKERS BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER Free Street Parade Pioneer Pageant FRIDAY MORNING IN CASH PRIZES 2 miles of curiosities ami relics of the pail. You tirRecl to exhibit your antiques in this pnarclc. Pioneer Picnic Immediately following llio parade a I Have Borst P goorl ark. Brinf; time. ur lunch Meet old friends Rodeo Fair Cirotmds Liacli Afternoon 2 o c Many Famous Riders Prizes lock Magnificent Night Shows Big Military Spectacle 8 P. M. EACH EVENING Fireworks Every Night Circus Acts Clown Every Night Different Free street show every Saturday afternoon. Outdoor Jitney Dance Tuesday and Saturday Nights Forget your the family to a mood for all. Be sure to cast your vote in the Queen blnnks in the Chronicle   

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