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Centralia Chronicle Advertiser Newspaper Archive: June 21, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Centralia Chronicle Advertiser

Location: Centralia, Washington

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   Centralia Chronicle Advertiser (Newspaper) - June 21, 1935, Centralia, Washington                             For ill the News all uw time read THE DAILY CHRONICLE Delivered to your home dally for 15c per week- toy mall 25o per month, Phone BM, Centralia Chronicle Advertiser NUMBER 105 CONTAINS ONLY A PORTION OF THE NEWS AND ADVERTISING Or- THE CENTRALIA DAILY CHRONICLE CENTRALIA. WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 1935 If It's a Good Bargain you'll find it in the "Advertiser" 4-HDELEG1W LEAVE :..wis county's delegation to the annual 4-H club encampment at State college, Pullman, June 17-32, left Sunday, accompanied, by County Agent P. D. Yeager and his assistant, Miss Sylvia Copp. No boys made the trip as they are busy at farm work. Girls mak- ii.g the trip were Martha Prechel, Betty Davis, Shirley Bonner, Marie Driskeir, irma Jane Huber and Virginia Champ of Winlock dis- trict; Maxine Bickford of Toledo; Betty Andrews and Frances Yeager of Centralia; Roselyn and Dorothy Kieszling and Eleanor Acheson of Chehaiis. Thurston cour.tj Delegates to th; camp and the clubs which they represent are as follows: Josephine Wells, Rochester cloth- ing, leader. Quentin Wells, Roches- ter garden. Bob Schnei- der's Prairie, garden. Trios. McBrat- rey, Schneider's Prairie, dairy. Bet- tv Sinclair, Schneider's Prairie, clothing. Clara Mawson, Schnei- der's Prairie, clothing. Helen Kel- fi'y, South Bay, clothing. Janice Braget, Nisqually, meal prepara- tion. Patricia Frederick, Nisqually, n.-eal preparation leader. Florence AEderson, Nisqually, clothing. Clara Mawson and Betty Sin- clair of Schneider's Prairie cloth- ing under the leadership of Mrs. Bliss Sinclair, will put on a room improvement demonstration Incom- petition with teams from other parts of the state who are enter- ed in the demonstration contest. Passion Play Star in New Role TO RAISE PHEASANTS Marking a new venture in propagation of game birds in this state, raising of pheasants will be undertaken by a special Clark county Four-H club, it was an- nounced today upon receipt of 350 eggs from the state game farm at Tacoma. The plan was initiat- ed by Loren Galbraith of this and is to be tried out also Jlli is season by clubs in about eight v other Washington counties. Correct this sentence: "I'll be rich some said the jobless youth, "but I'll always side with tfie underdog.' ELI RICE and IUs Orchestra at the EVERGREEN Olynipia-Tacoma Highway SAT., JUNE 22 li> Colored Entertainers and Floor Show (Including Tax) Dancing 9 Till 2 Tm'm daughters have biased the marriage, of Klara who gave up the role'of Marv Magda- lene in Obcrammcrgau's Passion Play to mirry Anton Lang, jr.. her child' hood sweetheart, Lang, son of the former Chrislus at the play, looks froudly at Klara, Elizabeth and Anna Marie in the tal at Washington. D. C clinmg 1 1-4 to 2 cents. Beceipts of medium and undergradcs are running heavier in eastern mar- kets. Buying interest has been limited. Representative Pacific coast creameries reported that their make was 4.5 per cent below a year ago. WASHINGTON STATE COL- LEGE, Pullman, June market on fowls continues strong and supplies very light, particu- larly in the heavier breeds, ac- cording to the weekly review of markets issued tthrough the agri- cultural extension service. Sup- plies of spring chickens are in- creasing Leg- horns and the market is weak to mostly 2 cents lower. Holdings of frozen turkeys continue heavy and occasional concessions are being offered on large lots. Prices hold very firm on dressed fowls. The egg markets were generally steady In early June at the lower level rrached at the beginning of the month. Supplies greater than those of the corresponding time last year. Prices of fresh I eggs, mixed colors, at New York during early June for Specials were 26 to 28 cents, Standards 25 1-4 to 25'.; cents and Firsts cents. The cold storage outlook for butter is not quite as favorable as previously. While Pacific coast holdings are still far below a year ago, they are greater than two years ago. The fact that is caus- ing the most concern is that cold storage holdings In the central west and cast are larger than in 1934 and continued tc show gains over a year ago. The butter markets displayed general weakness during late May and early June, most prices dc- POULTRY GROUP TO CONVENE JUNE 25 By CECIL SOLLY Editor qf Northwest There are a few bulbs which are well worth planting .now, for their blossoms add considerably to- the interest of the. Among the most striking .of iliese is the Belladonna Lily (Amary- llis Belladonna) and when estab- lished the plants will provide a magnificient display during late summer and fall. Once they .have planted the bulbs should be left undisturbed for several 'years Plant the bulbs in a well- drain- ed border. The tops of the. bulbs j should be 6 Inches beiow the sur- face of the soil and the bases should rest on sand. Mix well decayed manure and wood ashes! with the soil, placing the well belo.w the bulbs. Belladonna produces its .large spikes of fragrant flowers in fall; these attain a height of about 20 inches and arc freely. prdr1 duced. Other good varieties ,are A. rosea, deep rose-colored blooms! A. elata, deep rose; and A. speciosa purpurea, purplish-? rose with white center. t. The hardy Cyclamens provide some charming little flowers. They thrive well in partial shade, but require good drainage and proteo tion from ground winds, so that. Cops Weren't Foolin' This Time tion is a waste of nv.trrar; mid abor. Further information in tr> Hie fly and c'iiilr'il ii had from P.-M. horticultural inspector. SOT M-iivi street, Vanrouv'-r. PICNIC PLANNED The cherry frutl fly has cd and, where there has bi'en u previous infestation. it will b. necessary to spray clllrini; the nnxl few days to from worms. The cherry ed any which may insure1 cherrie the IrUBrnsey breeder; ci C U i county are plnnning u picric to held on Auqust ihe rounty a r a meeting la.si including tin' worked out, and he. charge of ;i cumni pi of J. Pr.dii n. Oregon state police and striking mill workers engaged In a good old- fashioned Donnybrook near Forest Grove, Ore., during the lumber billl strike that has paralyzed the industry in the Pacific Northwest, la Uiii picture one striker is coming out second best in his bruslj with the law. folingc iH'd control mei bused upon this f'anu eristic of I lie insert. A poison 1 lit. sprny is applied al'UT Ihn s from the soil. Thr -spr; if; com- posed of the following ingredi- ents: L ad nrsiMiiUe 8 ounces Mou'i.s.ses or syrup 1'j to 2 qts.; Water .10 nalloni. One or pints should be I sufficient for earli Iron as it is ail attractant. and it i.s unnecessary cover the foliage. The most im-j porlant factor In the control pro- j gram is the date tlic spray is applied. If the spray is applied too the flics will lay then- eggs in the fruit before they arci killed, and a too early applica-l Dclbcrt Smith rntl FRIDAY IS OLD GOLD DAY at BARLOW'S JEWELRY STORE Cash your old gold uf ;mv r.isid us nnd a ch'Tl; will :-f-m. you the .sitmr (lav. hold Old Gold irrtit-Jr; 5 rl.ty- nnd if rtmiilhiroH not i.sfactory we- rKurn tii'.'in at our cost. BARLOW'S Jewelry Store of Crocus are dainty little jects ,for the rock garden o'' front of a Rawer border. They flourish in almost any soil and the bulbs should be covered to a depth of I'X; to 2 incii.'s. ideal positions for the bulbs are worth growing are C. Longlflorus, under an old tree and at the soft lilac flowers; Salz- of a north-facing wall. They. mannj; violet-blue; sativus. are particularly attractive when growing In grass or among ferns. Add some lime to the site they arc to occupy, also some well decayed leaf mold. Shallow plant- ing should be the rule with the exception of C. europacum, which. Members of the Washington Certified Poultry association will hold -their .13th annual meeting Tuesday, June 25, at 10 a. m., at the Seatle Chamber of Commerce. meeting .this of vital interest to all poultry breed- ers and hateherymen. The new "National Poultry Improyement Plan" will be discussed. This is the plan proposed by the Hatchrry Coordinating Committee and op- proved byi the United States de- partment of agriculture. It will become effecitvc July 1. All members of the certified as- sociation should be present, and all poultrymen interested arc cor- dially invited to attend the meet- ing. HANNAFORD John Matmiilhr of Cowlitz Prairi.! visited over the week end with Ray Van Brunt.- Mrs. W. Lake of Centralia. was a dinner guest of Mrs. W. L. Eshom Thursday. Mrs. E. F. Hilborn and Mrs. Howard Ashley of Fords Prairie called upon Mrs. N.- Gilkey Thurs- day evening. Miss Colett Holle- of Garrard Creek is visiting this week with her brother-in-law a.nrl sister, Mr. and Mrs. L. F. VanRonk. should be with four to1 six inches of soil. These Cyclamens are divided into croups. The autumn flowering kinds include. C. caliclum, deep green foliage with silver zone and purple light pink floweri -wtih eye; C.' europatnim? silver-marbled foliage which is produced after the rose-pink flow- ers have faded; and C. alburn, silver-marbled foliage and whit; flowers. The spring flowering sort include Cyclamen Coumm, dark green foliage, deep rose flowers; C. Coum album, a white form of the first named, having brilliant purple center; C. Coum roseum, a pale rose form; C. ibericum roseum, dark green foli- age with silver zone, rose flowers; and C. repandum, silver-marbled foliage and bright crimson flow- ers. The Meadow Saffrom fcolchi- cum) produces large crocus-like flowers which are more or less checkered and vary in color from white to carmine-crimson during September and October. The foli- age Is not produced until sprin. Practically any garden soil suits the bulbs and their flowers look I attractive in the rock garden sur- rounded by dwarf evergreen plants, I such as Saxifrages, which afford protection to the flowers. They are also ideal for naturalizing in grassland. The autumn flowering varieties purplish-lilac, feathered violet; speciosus bright violet, yellow throat; and zonatus, rose-lilac. Sternbergia (Lily of the Field 11 is an effective autumn-flowering I I bulb which bears large like flowers. It likes a rather I light soil in a warm situation, and once planted should] be left undisturbed for several; years. Plant the bulbs 0 inches'] detp and, in cold districts, pro- thcm with a covering of straw during: winter. The best sorts are S. lutea major, golden yellow, and S. marcrantha, which blooms a littlte later and! has canary.. yellow flowers. The beautiful Zephyranthes, of Flower of the West Wind, also produces Crocus-like flowers in great confusion. It prefers a tect light well-drained soil, in a south border. A Real Achievement in Beauty and Value Never before has the kitchen stove been measured in such outstanding terms of beauty, efficiency, economy and conven iencc! Just one glance at this new Ml. Vernon range will convince you of its un- usual underneath its sparkling modern exterior you will find the real dollar Handsome new bar type Bakelite Handles. Cast iron flue back. Large, heavy cooking lop. Wide shelf and spacious 18-inch oven with full cast iron bottom. Porcelain enam- eled throughout. LIBERAL ALLOWANCE ON YpUR OLD RANGE AND EASY PAYMENTS ON THE BALANCE. Charlet's Furniture Co. "Quality Furniture for Lets" PURCHASE BULL Chohalis f 'laptcr. Future Farm- ers of America, recently purchased a fine purebred bull from George Biersdorf of Cornelius, Ore. The sire of the animal is Sibyl Bead- ed Bow 340627 and its dam is Noble Lady Lulu 9121100. Both the sire and dam arc from a line of gold and. silver modal ancestors. The boys of the Che- halb chapter feel that, they are making a wonderful contribution tu the good Jersey sires already availabl; to breeders of this vi- cinity. The purchase of the ani- mal was made possible through the co-operation of A. T. well known local Jersey FOREST .Mrs. Byrd who spent the in San Francisco arrived to visit with her son and daugh- I ter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Raymor.J Byrd. Mrs. Roberts, of Walla Walin, is a guest of her sister, Mrs. Dt-s- sie Smith the past week. Mr. and Mrs. George of Kiaber visited Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Ben Moravec. The Needlecraft Club member; I held a picnic at the Jacob.yj'.i i Grove. Thursday June 6th. i Miss June Smith left this weH: for the Rainier National where she will be employed the Paradise Inn for the Miss Smith is :ui accomplished musician, and will play in the orchestra. and Mrs. Marvin Dickson left for Lewiston, Idaho to spciKl the summer. (Varicose or Swollen You poor sufferers from bud legs! misery you have endured! Whiit crippling discomfort! I Bui here at last Is help for No operations nor Injections. enforced rest nor time off from work. A simple home treatment! with Emerald Oil heals your sores like magic, reduces swelling, soothes! pain, and makes your legs as good] ns you go about your I daily routine as usual, Follow the easy are .sure to be helped or money buck. Rlddell Drug Co. nnd drug- Rists everywhere sell lots of Adv, So you're going shopping? look at these prices! One look' at the goods nnd prices listed below will convince you that you car, save O'tra do! lars every week when you shop with us. BISOUICK For bcllcr Shortcake Large package PORK BEANS Van Camps 16-oz. cans 1UGAR Snowflake, Pure Cane 25 100 for a 10-word slogan for ZEE! Also 202 other cash awards! Ask us! I Rolls P'NUX BUTTER SCHOOL BOY 1 25 1 o Jar MATCHES airmont 6 box carton PRUNES Fancy SURE JELL Makes Canning oasie Per package GRAPENUT FLAKES Qc are ideal for sununcr breakfasts, PKG..... FLOUR- FREE BARREL -of- GROCERIES SATURDAY SOUND BRAND, 49-lb. BAG RELIANCE COFFEE 29' 3.bs SWANSDOWN CAKt FLOUR Makes finer ami fluffier cakes PUFFED WHEAT 3OQC for PUFFED RICE KARO Light and Dark RINSO Large 19' PALMOLIVE SOAP 6 SPINACH Del Monk- s'o f 2 No. 1 ins SHORTENING SWIFT'S ACORN PANCAKE FLOUR SPERRY'S lOt ERASER'S GROCETERIA 116 W. Main FREE DELIVERY Phone- 21   

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