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Harrisonburg Rockingham Register Newspaper Archive: February 12, 1907 - Page 1

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Publication: Harrisonburg Rockingham Register

Location: Harrisonburg, Virginia

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   Harrisonburg Rockingham Register (Newspaper) - February 12, 1907, Harrisonburg, Virginia                                4. Mil fear tiAKRISONBURG, VIRGINIA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1907. whole, no. 4678 UC�Y FOLKS ,;Sik��ral Case* Under Treatment � hi the town. Lacey Spring, "Va., Feb. 6.- Our community Is very much exercised over toe development of* seversl cases of icarlet fever right in town last week. Miss Emma Chapmao, atrthe home ot her father/ James Chapman, on North Main �treat, developed a case Of icarlet fever Friday night, and Mill Manna firoeden, who, lives with them, took hor bed Sunday with the same dreadful disease. Several other pises have alio been reported, but _: no new ones since Sunday. Dr. J.. E. Lincoln has taken every precaution to prevent the disease from spreading. � He bas directed all families under his care, wherein the disease has developed, v-and those who have been exposed to it, to stayiadoor* for some time, an order which ouV town folks appreciate very muob.. The public school is running and will continue open unless the disease breaks out among the students. It is understood today that all patients are doing well. David C. Sellers? of near Melrose, was kicked by a colt one day last week and right badly hurt. He was currying, and stepped around behind the horse, when he was kicked in the side with both feet by a colt in the adjoining stall. He was considerably bruised, but is now able to be up and about. Dr. J. �. Lincoln reports Dallas, She 13-year-old sod of Mr. afed Mrs. ^yhamp Jennines. who bas been  -"days. Joseph High, west of town, while nalking in his yard one day last leek completely lost his speech and is still usable to speak above a whisper. "Uncle" Joe bas many friends who regret his affliction. D. A, Brock had the misfortune to have his right thumb jerked out of place today while leading several hofses. The thumb is badly swollen aiU is giving him considerable p&jn, It is regretted that many persooi from � distance who tame to hear ib*' CfIfrlitl'Mi Endeavor program, which to* to have been rendered at the U. B. church last Sunday night, Were disappointed,but owing to the udden outbreak of scarlet fever the society thought best not to redder the program. Why couldn't our school boards or patrons furnish each puoil with a separate tin cup lor drinking purposes and place a cooler or vessel containing a spigot in every public school room in the country, so that pupils would be safe from the many contagious diseases that they are so often exposed to in the school room? Tin cups are cheap and a few dollars would save the spreading of disease and even death, which is caused by this promisoibus drinking. DRUMS MUST STAY OFF. WM P TtTTWILll DEAD. ON ATLANTIC LHKR HAMBUR6 Southern Won't Carry Over-Bib* Ions Passengers. The Southern Tluil   an was very much under the influence of liquor and incapable of taking care of himself. His friend insisted that the officials allow bim to take tbe "drunk" on the train and even offered to pay extra, but there was nothing doing and both stayed in town. Tbe order is a precautionary measure, both to protect the company in case of injury to that class of passengers and to insure the comfort and safety of the traveling public, by whom it is generally approved. Detailed Flans for Battleship. Senator Hale has presented to the Senate the detailed ~ plans for the big battle ship which it is proposed shali be built, as the equal of any flghting vessel now afloat or planned. The general information as to tbe dimensions of the proposed ship were made public several months ago, but very little has been known as to the strength of the batteries. This information now will be given to the public, includ-ng all foreign powers, if they de sire it, in the form of a public doc ument. ; The plans call for a battle ship 518 3 4 feet long, with beam of 85 feet 2 5-8 inbhe*, and draft of 29 feet 5 inches with everything on board. The armament will consist of a main battery of ten 12-inch breech-loading rifles, mounted on Ave electrically controlled .turrets on the center line, two forward above tbe forecastle deck, the second Bring.over the first, two aft on the main deck on the same level, and one amidships, .firing over the two after turrets. There are to be two submerged torpedo tubes. The secondary battery will consist of four teen 5-inch rapid fire guns, four 3-pounder saluting gun�, four pounder semi-automatic, two inch field pieces, and two machine guns of .30 caliber. Tbe second battery of fourteen 5-inch guns will be located on the gun deck,  forming two broadside batteries of seven guns each; tbe corner guns will be equipped for head and stern firing, respectively Smaller guns will be located in com manding positions so as to give large unobstructed range of fire, Aged Citiiin of Kt. Crawford leigh- betbeod and Confederate Soldier. ' William P. Tutwiler died at bis home near Mt. Crawford early Wednesday morning from a complication of diseases. He bad been in bad heal h for some time and had been confined to tbe bouse for several months. . r The funeral wss held yesterday morning at 10 o'clock from his late residence. The services were conducted by Rev. H. L. Myerly, of the Methodist church. Interment *as in the cemetery at Mt. Crawford. Mr. Tutwiler wis born near Mt. Crawford 71.years ago; He was a son of the late Samuel Tutwiler, For years Mr. Tutwiler bad been a shoemaker at Mt. Crawford, but during the latter years of his life had lived on a farm and bad been engaged in buying and selling stock. Surviving bim are one daughter, Miss Lula; and one sister, M ifs Martha Jane Tutwiler. His wife, who was a Miss Showalter, died some years ago. Mr. Tutwiler was a Confederate soldier during the Civil |.War, serv ing throughout the conflict in one of the Rockingham companies. He had many friends in the yiciaity of Mt. Crawford, by whom be was highly respected. LENIENCY FORJOWOYSHEU Three Month* in Jail and $65 for Assault. Charles Howdyshell. a youth of 18, who balls from the Ottobine neighborhood, was tried and con victed Friday in Circuit Court on charges of unlawfully assaulting William O. Curry and George W. Knicely, young men of the same neighborhood. For the two offenses is punishment was fixed at three months in jail and fines amounting to $65. When Howdyshell was called for trial, his counsel, Mr. James B. Stephenson, asked leave to withdraw tbe plea of not guilty, entered n each case at a previous day of the term, and plead guilty to charges of unlawful assault. For his trial be would-waive a jury and go before the Court. The indictments, Mr Stephenson said, charged felonious assault, but. Commonwealth's At torney Conrad had agree! to waive the felony charge in the event that the accused admitted his guilt of the lesser offense, of unlawful assault. Mr. Conrad concurred in this statement, whereupon Judge Haas proceeded to hear the evidence. The only witnesses examined were Curry and Eincely. - The'former said that he was stabbed by the accused on January 27, 1906, while he and Howdyshell were both under the influence of hard cider. Knicely testified that on last Christmas while drinking with Howdyshell the latter out at him with a knife, but missed bim, Both vo ing men said they bad been friends of the accused prior to the offense and that their friendly relations were not die turbed by the boy's reckless conduct, which they accounted for as being due to intoxication. In the Curry case Judge Haas gave Howydsbell two months in jail and fined him $40. In the other be limited the punishment to one month in jail and a fine of $25. The punishment meted out to Howdyshell had previously been agreed upon by Messrs, Stephenson and Conrad. The latter told Judge Haas that Howdyshell. had grown up without parental training or wholesome guidance of any kind and be felt that it was fit case for leniency. The boy was industrious and had never proven bad exoept when drinking. . In response to a reprimand by Judge Haas, Howdyshell promised that he would mend his ways, From New York City Naples via Gibraltar. to Items from Cheery Grove. Cherry Grove, Va.. Feb. 7,--N W. Lam has purchased a sma farm at New Erection of W. H Pence for $1600. to which place be expects to move on the first of March, We are very sorry to loose Mr. Lam as a neighbor, but we congratulate tbe people of New Erection vicinity on belpg so fortunate in receiving a most estimable family, who are not only quiet, peaceable, accomodating, and honorable, but a good Christian family, and Christian-workers in church and Sunday-school. John A, Showalter has sold his farm near Cherry Grove to his son-in law, J. N. Smith, some 86 acres for $4,750, with some other consider atlonj. The graded school here, with Miss M, R. Patterson and Miss A, Miller as teachers, is progress ing nicely, with some improvements in discipline, etc, , United Brethren Appointments. Rev, N. F. A. Cupp, pastor on the Lacey Spring U. B. charge, announces  the   following  appoint ments: Feb, 10, Bethel 2:30 p. m,, sacramental, Special services atHerwin Chapel March 3, at 7 p. m, conducted by Rev. W. F. Gruver, P. E. All members of the church should be present on this important occasion. Tbe Quarterly Conference will be held Monday, March 4, at 10 a. m, at Her win Chapel, All official members of the charge should be present or send reports. Tbe Annual Conference meets at Kdinburg, Va., March 13. Aboard the "Hamburg," Hamburg-American Line. Off Gibraltar, Jan. 19, 1907. Dear Register: Perhaps some of your kind readers might be. interested in a brief run across the Atlantic from New York to Gibraltar en route for Naples, There are of course numerous excellent lines of steamship service between these points. The one I chose is the Hamburg-Ameri can and I have bad no reason to regret my selection. The "Hamburg" is not one of the largest vessels of the line, being a little less than 600 feet long and 58 feet' beam; From bold to boatdeck there are.seven stories, the first three being under water. In these three are placed the engines and machinery for operating the vessel, the coal necessary for the voyage, carloads upon carloads of foodstuffs for passengers and crew, ice, fresh spring water, and a large cargo of all kinds of freight except live stock. It requires a crew of over 250 to operate the "Hamburg." For not only must there be officers, physicians, machinists, engineers fire men, sailors, a large number of stewards to care lor the staterooms (bedrooms) and the dining rooms, but also a large number of work men, for much of the repairing, especially painting the decks and exposed machinery, masts and other parts which tbe salt water, and spray quickly corrode', must be done during the voyages. Although the Hamburg is a twin-screw steamer and IS never expected to need sails, yet as an additional means of safety for her passengers, should an accident disable her machinery, a full complement of mas's, sails, yards, and tackle is kept constantly in best order, ready for use at the commander's word. A great numebr of ventilators run to her lowest apartment, supplying every part bountifully with fresh air, and so the objectionable, nauseating odors, the presagerg of seasickness, are not found on the vessels of this line. The great advantage of the elec trie light perhaps never appeals to one ?more strongly- than on ship board. It is comparatively free from danger to the vessel by fire, and can be so comfortably distributed both to the large and especially to the numerous small rooms and hallways so necessary in every steamship. Our ship is equipped with the Micronigraph system and every day receives the most important events both from Cape   Cod, Mass., for America and from Poldhu, England, for / Europe,  Asia,    and   Africa Thursday we were in communication with  both  at  once, the   former being 1350 miles  away and the latter 1700.   These wireless raes sagf 8 are printed every evening on board in a little paper, "Tbe At lantic Daily News" and distributed to the passengers free.   Thus we have had quite a clear account of the Dakota blizzard, tbe earthquake in Jamaica, the $2,000,000, Rocke feller gift "to   Louisville's   new university, and the news of most general interest each day.   This a valuable privilege, not to speak of tbat of sending messages ashore At New York, Thursday. January 10, at 2 p. m. sharp , our commanding officer  gave  the  command "Everybody  ashore 1"    This was repeated after   the interval   of a minute, the gangways were lifted, the steam tender began backing tbe "Hamburg" out of her dock, and in the center of East River beaded her down stream, slipped her cable and the great steamer's own engines began their movement which they must keep steadily night and day for 4455 miles,or for fourteen days, till Genoa, Italy, is reached, with a brief call  at  Gibraltar  and  at NapleB.   Soon we had passed New York's  great "skyscrapers," the frowning   fortifications  of  Fort Hamilton, tbe Narrows and Sandy Hook.   As we came abreast Sandy Hook Light Vessel, the pilot steam wave than usual break clear over the main deck, and at only a fow meale would our plates persist In slipping from the table into our laps. Of course during the rough seas the children, most of the women, and many of the men, were seasick. I happened to be among tbe fortunate who missed no meals and was not sick once. Our course lay just north of the Azore Islands, but too far off tp perm|t us to see clearly any but Flores, the most western of the group. Tbe last two days before reaching Gibraltar have been bright and clear and not cold. As we approached Gibraltar tbe coast north and south of Capo St. Vincent showed very great varieties of color and ruggedness of formation. All buildings and even those of tbe villages wore white. This forenoon wc foil,in with an Italian sailing ship from Chili, South America, and bound.for one of the ports of France. She had been out 120 days. While rounding Cape Horn on tbe 13th of October she was caught in tbe ice and held fast twenty days. She was out of food and our captain stopped the "Hamburg" for an hour and sent to the d'stressed three boat loads of' flour, potatoes, and other necessary food. The spirit of hospitality among sailors is very beautiful. Yours very truly, W. B. Yount. BBAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. Conveyances Admitted  to Beeord Since Saturday, February 2. The following deeds of bargain and sale have been admitted to record since Saturday, February 2, 1907. Deed dated April 6, 1906, Polly Dove to Franklin V. S. Dove, life time interest in the land of Franklin V. S. Dove* $100. Deed dated September 3, 1836, Stephen Harnsberger and wife to John Hess, 1,263 acres of land in Brocks Gap, $3,250 Deed da>ed July 10. 1906, Charles C.Switzer and Emmanuel Hechheim-er to. Geneva D. Gray, lot of land fronting on east side of Collicello street, Harrisonburg, adjoining grantee and otners, $300. Deed dated February 2, 1907, George C. Burtner and wife to Boyd S. Garrison a certain lot or parcel of land with dwelling thereon, located in West End addition to Dayton, $700. Deed dated September George A. Neff and John to David May, 38 acres, and 27 poles of land on "snnside" of Pendleton mountain, adjoining Silas May and others, $15 Deed dated April 28, 19(16, John N. Garber and wife and B. F. Garber and wife to Samuel Hollar, lots N03. 10, 20 and 21 in Garber & Garber's addition to Harrisonburg. $150. Deed dated January 28, 1907, Andrew R. Van Pelt to Charles R May, house and lot about 1 1-i miles west of Singers Glen, $280. Deed dated   February 7, 1907 Geneva D. Gray to Bowman Gil more, lot of land and improvements thereon on east side of Collicello street, Harrisonburg, $700. VERDICT IN JTHIRTY MINUTES Defendant's Counsel Mercilessly Flays Wife of Priiones. Riverhead, L. I.', Fibrua-ry 7.-Dr. James W. Simpson, tbe New York dentist who has been on trial here for the murder. of his father-in-law, Bartley T. Horner, was 'acquitted tblB morning. The jury'in the case were out only a it tie over half an hour. Horner was killed on the night of December 27, 1905, by a shotgun held in Dr. Simpson's hands. Various gossip led to the arrest of the dentist on the charge of murder. His defense was that he did not know the gun was loaded in the first place, and that it went off entirely by accident. In tbe trial Dr. Simpson's wife and her mother testified for the prosecution. They were'not present when the verdict was given this morning. Two women and a vacant chair occupied tbe center of the scene toward which the eyes of the jurors were constantly directed during the closing hours of yesterday's sessions, which ran late into the night. One of the woman was Mrs. Charles L. Bowman, sister of Dr. Simpson. She was introduced to the jurors in the summing up as one little woman who is a type of womanhood and whose word has been heard and respected." The other was Mrs. Bartley T. Horner, widow of tbe man wh:ni Dr. Simpson is charged with murdering. There was paid to ber tbe respect of silence compelled by ber symbols of mourning and ber silvered hair The vacant chair marked the absence of Mrs. Julia Simpson, wife of tbe defendant. It was against her tbat Dr. Simpson's counsel, Martin T. Man ton, directed his most scathing words.- "It is for you to decide, gentle man of the jury, be said, whether a woman with a lying heart shall be supremo in the issue of her bus btmi's life. She is the woman who, abii it (if ''atred represents herself 9, P. 3 1904, Alger rcods is'enjoying $15,000, much of which Is her husband's money. Tbis case is a concerted action to send this man away, either for revenge or fancied wrongs. District-Attorney Furman lauded the courage of Mrs. Simpson and Mrs. Horner in coming into court and speaking the truth, although the shafts were buried In Dr. Simpson. Mr. Furman concluded his. summing Up shortly after 9 o'clock and Justice   Keeley. adjourned court. HEBOES OF THE TUHHELS. had been the jury, an  inter- DEATH OF ISAAC GOOD. Native of West Rockingham Succumbs to Attaok of Pneumonia. hsaa? Good, a well kn^wn resi dent, died at 4 o'clock Friday morning at his home near the Ashby Monument, after an illness of two weeks, Mr. Good oaugbt s severe cold three weeks ago ana later developed pneumonia. During the past.ten days bis condition bad been critical and for several days was momentarily   ex- a native and life-Rockinghara, bav- (LIVlRPJLlSjJS WILL CURE HEADACHE DIZZINESS. BILIOUSNESS.  , TQrtFIQ UVER- I aOUO ATAULBWUtt �JWO COUHTWY W8IIU. er "New Jersey" oame alongside and gracefully dropped a small boat with two rowers. The "Hamburg" lay to for a few minutes. A rope ladder was let down, Down came our pilot, swung on the lad der into the little boat, gave a farewell salute to our otScerB and was rowed away to tbe "New Jersey," waiting for him at a little distance. Unacr the oare ot ber own efficient officers and the unforgotting care of fostering Providence, our voyage bas been a very good one. Three days wo had cloudy, cool weather and what our sailors call a "rough sea," In a calm sea one scarcely feels tbat the "Hamburg" is moving, so steadily is she with her "bilge keels" and splendidly distributed but enormous weight. So even in these beavy-swelling teas, only a few times did a larger his death peated, Mr. Good was long resident of ing been bora hear New Erection 52 years ago. He was a son of John P. Good, whose death occurred some years ago. Early in life Mr. Good was apprenticed to the potter's trade and for years followed tbat vocation. Fifteen years ago hi moved from West Rockingham to the Mt. Sinai neighborhood, where he had resided ever since. Since his boyhood Mr. Good hud been a member of the Mennonito church and was on honest and up right man, who was held in high es teem by a large circle of acquaintances in Harrisonburg and vioin ity. Surviving him are his widow, who was M'ss Ashenfolter, of West Rockingham, and ten children Mrs. Laogdoo, of Baltimore; Mrs, Charles Landes, of near Mt. Sinai; Misses Settle and Icie, who reside at homo; aud Messrs. Perry, of Staunton; Charles, Jobn, Weldon, Otto, and Ellis, who live near Harrisonburg. He also leaves one brother, John Good, of South English. Iowa, and two sisters, Mrs. Jacob buter and Mrs. Abram Myers, of West Rockinghm. to hi tbu loving wife A short time after she verbally a.-rainged before Mrs. Simpson granted view:   She said: "My mother and I wore-and have always been unwilling witnesses. We were summoned to court on subpoena. We were asked to tell the truth and that is what we did "Attention bas been called to our leaving our home in Northport to confer with District-Attorney Fur man in Patohogue. He summoned us there and we bad to comply. I have nothing to say concerning the outjnme of tbe trial." Before the case was coniplet d for presentation to tbe jury the prose cution assailed the testimony of S Ettinger Fr.nk.   He is the witness whose discovery tbat tbe shells ofY end in evidence  were n t those from which the fatal charges were 6red shook the State's case to the foundation on Tuesday night.   He was recallod and testified that Mrs Horner held a-$5,000 mortgage on a Northport  poperty in which his brother, Dr. I. Frank, a State witness, was interested. 'Didn't you apply to Mrs. Hor ner for a serond mortgage of $12, 500 and was refused? ' "Yes sir." "Didn't yoJ threaten to testify for the defense in this case if she refused? ' "Not a word." Frank insisted that tbe shells he took from tbe gun with which Mr Horner was killed were yellow while those offered in evidence are rrd Lawyer  Man ton told the jurors that thev must be in the dark, as he  was, as  to a  motive for the alleged murder of Bartley T, Hor ner. "There is positively no evidence of Mr, Horner's determination to make a new will," he said, "Mrs Horner tells one and Mrs. Simnson another story of a quarrel alleged to have ooourrod between Or. SI mo-son and Mr. Horner a few nights before the shooting. It is for you, gentlemen of the jury, to say which, if either, is true. "Mrs Simpson so loves her husband and Mrs, Horner so loves him tbat they would send him to the electric chair. This wife has allowed her husband to sit behind bers for a year, has delivered to the prosecution all the faots she claims to possess, has done all she could to have him convicted. This is tbe way she loves bim. Tbis is the love of a true wife Why. Dr. Simpson lived in a home which was a hell. "Why does Alonxo Blydonberg take Mrs. Simpson driving without his own wife and children? U is often said that woman is a mystery. It is true under certain circumstances that a woman may go aside to falsify. But why is not Mrs. Simpson at ber husband's side. sVhy bus she not borne food to him in prison and comforted bim with her counsel? Is this serpent of womankind the kind described as the noble type ot womankind?  She Daring Deeds of "Sand Hogs" that Are Unknown and Unsnug. Tunnel laborers are a high grade of workmen, and among them are scores of potential heroes, although they would laugh if told so. Every time there is a "blow-out" this fact is dramatically demonstrated. An example of this occurred last June in one 6t tbe East river tunnels. After a blast had been exploded the thirteen men who were working 500 feet under tbe river, and perhaps seventy five feet below it, hastened forward, only to be confronted by a rush of swirling water and mud. The dreaded "blow-out" had occurred, Part of tbe roof formed bv the river bed had given way, and water was rushing in. while tbe protecting "air" wos rushing out, The lights grew dim and- the tunnel 3lied with fog, as it always does under a "b.'ow-out." Stumbling and groping, the men turned and rushed frantically back to the airlock. This big airlock was closed. The foreman tugged at the door, but it did not budge. The only thing left to do was to scramble up to the small emergency lock above, The men were in a panic. Action must be quick if they were to be saved, If two meq got wedged in tbis door, big enougu only for one. a precious minute might be lost, and with it tbe lives of all. That was just exactly what was about to happen, when the foreman seized a pick handle lying qn the floor. With this weapon in his resolute hands, be lined up the panic-stricken rain and made them crawl one by one through the narrow opening to safetv. Then ho crawlod through himself, not a minute tro late, for the water vas already entering tbe lock as he banged the door leading into the tunnel. Safe in the lock one of them, not yet rerovered froao his fright, turned on the valvofo hard that they would all prokfably have had -'the.bends" if the heroic fore-mun had not stood guard over the valve with the pick handle until bo had brought the whole party out without the loss of a man. A few days later, in another tunnel, thirty men were working out about 120 feet from the lock where n "blow-out" occurred. "Danger," shouted tome one, and the whole gang made for the airlock. They made it easily and closed the door-all except two men who had volunteered to stay and see if the hole in the river could not be stopped up, (Jften it is possible to plug a small hole with a coat or shirt, and the river bed will close the hole made bv the "nir."-World's Work. FORTY YEARS MARRIED. at Anniversary Happily Observed Home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph. Rawley Spriogs, Feh. 7.-With more than forty years of happy married life to thoir credit, blessed with a competency of this world's goods and surrounded by children, grandchildren, neighbors and friends. Mr. and Mrs. J. C, Joseph, of the Rawley Springs neighbor-hood.yisterda.y celebrated tbe sixty-fourth anniversary of Mr. Joseph's birth. The culiuurv department has always been a feature of thn Joseph homo, which is one of the those old-fiishloned households whore appetizing viands take the place of cut glass, napkins urd tiogtv bowls and wlji re old-time fire-side hospitality and yixid ehe+r are still in vogue. Oa this particular occasion the Bplr't of happ'ness and gocd-will seemed more in evidence than over before, and the roa>t fowl, ice cream and other tempting eatables were even greater than on previous occasions. A feature was tbe unique manner which Mr. and Mrs. Joseph took to surprise their ohilrden, thoy having placed a obeck itnder each child's plate for a neat little sum, aggregating noarly $3,000. One daughter, Mrs. Jesse Armentrout, left for her home in Ohio, today, having been a guest at the Joseph and other homes in this locality for some time past. ,, HAIR BAJLS   

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