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Harrisonburg Daily News Newspaper Archive: February 11, 1903 - Page 1

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Publication: Harrisonburg Daily News

Location: Harrisonburg, Virginia

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   Harrisonburg Daily News (Newspaper) - February 11, 1903, Harrisonburg, Virginia                                 r\  ¿A.  Vol. 8, No. 67.  HARRISONBURG, VA., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1903.  WEATHER.  Tu. <il a v. rain ami varmc-r. Tim r< day pr.ilmhlv fnlr ami - .,l,|rr  Price 1 Cent  MILLER'S BARGAIN STORES. FROM  Main Street and Public Squi Howard. A A ■  TIIBERYILLE  69  Bankrupt Stock Soiling at 50 cents on tho Dollar and Less—Great Shoe Selling: at our Stores this Week, cents. Ladies' heavy, seamless Shoes, worth §1.25, sizes, 4 and 5. cents. Ladies' Tan Shoes, in lace, worth §1.50, 50 pairs left, cents. Boy's and Girl's heavy dress Shoes, worth §1.25. cents. Children's button or lace 'Shoes, sizes, 8 to 12, worth 88c. cents. Ladies' flno Shoes, lace tips, eome worth $1.50. cents. Men's fine dress Shoes, lace or congress, worth $1.25. Boy's Shoes, (Klimax Brand), the best in tho world for the money.  IOC cents. Ladies' and Men's (Klimax Brand) Shoes, solid leather, every pair a wearer, §1.25.  $| OS centB. Men's flno dress Shoes, (Klimax Brand), conts. Calicoes. Wo just recoivcd 5,000 yards of extra quality, dark calico, what yon have been looking for, Cc. grade, as before, only 2J„' conts.  ABEL MILLER. Ownkr Phono Connection.  Broadway Locals.  Broadway, Fob. 9.—Ye editors should have stated explioitely which of your handsomo male correspondents wore married. Some of our fair sex would enjoy a mild flirtation if they could make up their mind which were the single ones. You were kind enough to state that \V. O. Moubray was unmarried, but there is a "mortgage" on him and it would be but little fun when you know yon are the one who would ' 'get letf.'' We missed tho Bridgewater letter last week and hopo that the correspondent from that place has not become discouraged after viewing the handsome feat-nres of tho other . brilliant writers, dome again, we imagine yon would take tho prize if you could ever over come your stage fright.  The mad dog scare a few weeks ago is nothing in comparison with the smallpox fright now. The three physicians are kept busy vaccinating. When you aro met on the street you will invariably be asked the question, "Aro you vaccinated yet?" You aro even awakened out of your sleep by thinking you hear some one shouting the rime question in your ears.  If tho smallpox will allow, Rev. J. J. Ringer will hold a week's meeting, commencing Sunday night at the M. E. Church.  Wo saw a young man promenading our streets yesterday who looked very much like a preacher with hia beaver hat and swallow-tail coat. Although thoro was no appointment for preaching at any of the churches we think ho was an eloquent and effective talker to an audience of one willing listener.  roooooo^oooo^ooo^oo^ 0 ooo  I  We can keep your linen clean  & Keep Clean. H  Clothes luundrled one day and returned the next, and the best work guaranteed.  TROY STEAM LAUNDRY,  . East Market Street. tSTXo Branch Offices In town.  !  14773 IT'S CLEAR.  Auyone who will look atour stock of OPTICAL GOODS and compare prices will be satisfied that here and here only does good quality and moderate charges go hand In hand.  The complete lineof Eyeglasses and Spectacles carried enable us to fit all ordinary cases of impaired eyesight quickly.  In complicated cases tests are made and special lenses prepared.  D. C. DEVIER, Jeweler,  Telephones Vaccinated for Harrisonburg's Benefit.  8AYS OUR GAY CORRESPONDENT  A Quarantine Against Mechanicsville. Other Local and Personal Events.  Timbervillo, Fob. 9. —Charles Koontz, a young man who wont to Pittsburg, Pa., some timo ago from this neighborhood, is ill at that place with typhoid fever.  Charles Bennett, tho lad who somo timo ago loft his homo here after striking Edward Rinker.a playmate, on tho head with a pailing, was last week located in Pago County, near Luray, and brought home.  The work of planting poles preparatory to moving tho tolephono exohango hero has bogun. The contract for moving it was given to Michael Lcsthorn, who is pushing the work, and soon we may expect a new voice at central.  Tho Town Council, at a mooting held last Saturday evening, instituted a quarantine against Mechanicsville, whore there aro ten cases of smallpox. Guards havo boon stationed and travellers from that locality are excluded from our town of beauty and splendor( ?) At the same meeting all stores hero were ordered olosed promptly at 8 p. m. This is really one of the best things tho council has evor done, as it will put a stop to the lounging around tho stores, wliioh has been indulged in to a great extent and which at this particular timo is dangerous to our physical well boing. There wero no sorvices at tho churches her Sunday owing to the smallpox scare; and there will bo as little done in the near future as possible to attract the attention of the Meolianicsville neighborhood. Vaccination goes on, and is extending to sister towns.  Although it is not definitely understood that smallpox is transmitted by transmitters, Dr. Swit-zer has taken the extra precaution to protect Harrisonburg and has vaccinated every 'phone in tho place. How thankful Harrisonburg should be. Ever one of the doctors vacoinations leaves a mark some thing like this  In some cases there was marked irritation and inflamation, which was later followed by an amputation operation.  From Mayland. Mayland, Feb. 10.—Mr. Luther Spitzer, son of Jessie Spitzer, and Miss Katie Layman, daughter of Mr, Eli Layman, wero quietly married at Rev. D. H. Zeigler's on Sunday eve last.  Mr, Walter Wolverton and wife, who were visiting relatives and friends here for the past two weeks, returned to their home in Cumberland last week.  Mr. J. N. Kennedy left this morning for Philadelphia, where his son lies seriously ill.  Mr. J. D. Hillyard is in Ohio at present looking after their interest in some western real estato.  Amanda, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Whitmere, is very much indisposed at this time.  Spitzer and Co. are sawing for Mr. Frank Albright at present.  Mr. Phil Holsinger, Jr., moved today to J. Frank Holsinger's, and Mr. Joseph McGee to Mr. Zeigler's, and Mr. Atwell Conrad to Mr. Wampler's.  Our public roads have been in a bad condition for some time, owing to much rain. Let us all turn out to the good roads meeting and try to better our roads.  In the Police Court.  Tho Police Court presented an unusually active scene yesterday.  Het. Harvey, a negro woman of questionable character, paid $2 for raising a disturbance at her home in New Town several nights ago.  Officer Crider brought Henry Williams before the mayor for being drunk. Henry was ordered to pay $1 for his fun, but he had left his "cash" at home, and will remain in jail for an equivalent to time.  Wade Long, the crap shooter, who was arrested Sunday night, was fined $1 and costs.  SUICIDE AT IT. SIDNEY.  David Reed Killed Himself With a Shot Gun Yesterday.  [Special to tho Ttfttly Nows.]  Mt. Sidney, Fob. 10.—David Reed, who lived with his fathor-in-law, Daniel Garber, at Ft. Dofianeo, committed suicido today. Ho took a shot gun from tho house, laid it along tho fence, tied a string to tho trigger and pulled it, tho full chargo passed through tho body, killing himself instantly. No causo is known for tho rash act.  Nefi-Rhodes.  Mr. Charles W. Noff, son of Mr. and Mrs. Miohaol Noff, of Timbervillo, and Miss Katie E. Rhodos, tho attractive daughtor of Mr. and Mrs. Emory Rhodes, of Mt. Clinton, wore married in the parlors of tho Clarendon Hotol yesterday afternoon at 8 o'clock by Rov. M. A. Kioffer, pastor of tho Reformed Churoli at Timbervillo. The bride is ono of Mt. Clinton's best-known young ladies and tho groom ìb a progressivo young farmer. Both aro exceedingly popular.  Quarantine at Timberville. Timbervillo, Fob. 10.—The quarantine which was established horo this morning has been most effective and all day today tho streots havo presented a lonesome appearance. There is practically no business boing dono horo. Many persons havo been turned back. Tho situation has been explained to them and they havo ac-oepted it philosophically.  Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Aldliizer returned from Mt. Sidney today, whero thoy were called by tho death of Mrs. Aldhizer's fathor, Mr. Moore. Thoy recoived a telegram Friday morning stating that ho was very ill and bo-foro tho first southbound train camo they reoeivd anothor mossago announcing his death.  Miss May Funk, of Moor's Store, spent Sunday with relatives in thiB place.  Master Hugh Williams has boon quito sick for several days.  Rev. W. J. Hubbard, pastor of tho Baptist Church of this place has rented tho Grim property on High street and will occupy it some time next month.  Nows has boon so soarco in our town _for tho past weok that your correspondent has been almost in dospair, but appearances seem to indicate quito a livoly business in tho near futuro and wo hopo to make up for lost time.  Since writing tho abovo the Broadway Council met and passed tho following ordinance:  As a safe guard to our people and to arrest tho further spread of tho disease, due notice is hereby given, Tho town of Broadway has raised a quarantine against all persons who have been in contact with, or in any way exposed to the malady which is pronounced by physicians to be smallpox. No such person, or persons who may be supeoted even, shall bo allowed to pass in through said quarantine, and tho same shall continue in force until all danger of communicating the disease shall have passed. All persons violating or disregarding this order shall bo liable to prosecution to the full extent of tho law. The line beignning at tho spring of Rush Mason, thence to Ed Mason's house, thence to Thomas Hilbert's house, thence in a straight line to River at Jackson Knupp's.  Profitable Virginia Orchards.  Mr. G. W. Koine r, of Augusta, commissioner of agriculture, presents some'interesting facts in regard to Virginia apples. He gays there aro now growing in this state a little over eight million peach trees and about two million more of small fruifs. In his opinion this is really only tho beginning of tho fruit growing business in Virginia. The soil, climate and location make the state especially well adapted to profitable fruit culture, and he cites instances where orchards produce $750 per acre from one crop. Of course, in all these cases of large profits the crops aro produced only according to tho most scientific and approved methods. He says the average of fairly well cultivated orchards will yield from $100 to §500 per acre.  FOR SALE.—Good piano; also funiture. Call at tho residence of the late Dr. J. B. Amiss  A CROWDED HOUSE  Greeted Rev. Percy Elsom at the Baptist Church Last Night.  TALKS OF THE "HOLY SPIRIT."  Holy Spirit is tho Power God Intended for Christians.—The Powor Consists of Lovo.  Swartz Bros. & Hott have now on hand cotton seed feed and flax seed meal. fl2.  Last night tho Baptist Church was crowdod with ongor listeners. Mr. Elsom preached a powerful sermon, every word growing out of it heart of lovo and earnestness.  Again ho talkod on the "Holy Spirit." Lk. 24:41). "Tarry ye in tho city of Jerusalem until yo be (indued with powor from ou high. " Tho proaclior said in part:  Tho world is soaroliiug for powor. Bnajnoss men aro looking for tho bout powor. Tho ohurohos aro looking for power, but thoy aro searching in tho yvrong places. Thoy aro building flno houses, omploying oducated ministers, and paying largo salaries for music, thinking that those things will give them powor, but thoy aro mistaken. Tho Holy Spirit is tho powor God has intended for Chris-tians, and unloss thoy havo the Spirit all oxtornalities will fail.  Tho powor of tho Holy Spirit consists in a numbor of things. <>uo is His personality. Ho possesses will, mind, porforms acts that will only porsons could porform. Tho power consists in lovo. Lovo is tho supremo choice by tho human soul of God. Thoro is no substitnto for lovo, and wo lovo only as tho Spirit fills us. Powor consists in ability to boar suffering. Paul and Sila» could nover havo borne thoir persecutions at Philippi unless tho Spirit had been in thom. Powor consiBtB iu ability to guido. Thoro aro no accidents in tho world. God rules it or it is ruled by chauco. If Ho rules it, tho process is through tho Holy Spirit. Tho powor consists iu tho ability to do effoctivo Chritian work, and in tho ability to give liborty.  Christians aro to got tho Holy Spirit by getting thoir hearts right, by surrendering themselves into God's ■hands.  This is but an imporfoct out-lino of a wonderful discourso. When tho preachor sat down no ono could doubt but .that ho was filled witli that power which ho would havo dis-seminatod among all presont. Ho preacheB as a God-sent messongor, and when ho prays ho talks with God us a child with his eurthly paront.  Missionary meeting at2:!i0 p. in. today, and preaching sorvico at 7:.'i0 this evoning. Lot a largo audionco  greet tho groat preacher.  - .. .......♦ • ♦----  Real Estate Transfers.  Jan. ill.—J. L. Shockoy and wife to J. M. Aloxander, a certain tract of land, with buildings, etc., lying near Timborvillle, $-108.  J. Samuel Harnsberger, special com-missoner to Mrs. Florence Palmer, 48 acres, 4 roods and 21 poles of land, abjoining Mrs. V. Miller and others, $850.  J. N. C. Pickering to Charles M. Life, a % undivided interests in 1 acres, 3 roods and 11 poles of land two miles east of McGaheysville, $100.  Ed. C. Martz, special commissioner, to John S. McLeod, 1 aero of land, more or less, adjoining McLeod and others, §125.  John T. Harris, spocial commis sionor, to Sallio P. Miller, 149 acres 1 rood and 80 poles of land, $C,G75.  Feb. 8—Bettio A. Lambert to E. L. Lambert, 201 acres of land, adjoining E. W. Hensloy, Peter Sollors and others, $6,000.  John W. Blackburn, section of Grottoes Company, and others, to the counties of Rockingham and Augusta, an iron bridge and approaches over South River, $2,COO.  Feb. 4.—Martin B. Miller, exec utor of Isaao Miller, deceased, Fred erick H. Cline, GO acres, 3 roods and 70 poles on west side of South Creek, $-1,016.50.  Feb. 5.—J. C. Stoigel and wife to T. R. Lokey, lot No. 36, Steigol and Buchers addition to Harrisonburg, on Franklin street, 1350.  Daniel S. Caracofee and wife to Sallio A. Landes, house and lot con taining about aore, adjoining Landes and others, near Bridgewater, |250.  USES IT'S OWN COAL,  Choaapeake Wcstorn Gives tho Stokcs-ville Coal a Thorough Tost.  Comparatively few people an' aware that semi-anthracite coal of excellent quality linn been discovered in considerable quantities in North River (tap, upon the properties of tho Chesapeake Western Hail road, not. far from Stokosvillo, yet such in tho gratifying fact. Within the past few days this coal has supplied the fuel with which several of the Chesapeake Western trains have heeii operated from Htokesville to Harrisonburg and return. The coal was thus tested and found to make excellent fuel for general ing steam, no other than the Stokesville coal heiug used oil the trips.  The coal that was used in these tests is being dug from a seven foot vein of semi-anthracite on I,idle North River, about one and one-fourth mill's Northwest of St.okevil le and one-quarter of a mile from the tram-road. The railroad company havo an entry heading driven about one hundred feet, and are installing car tracks, chutes, screens and bins, preparatory to using the coal in tho Chesapeake Wetorn engines, recent tests have so clearly demonstrated the valuo of the coal for engine and other pnrposos.  Will Raiso Quarintino-Dr. Lay ton B. Yancey, of McGah-oyaville, whom tho County Hoard of Health placed in chargo of the few smallpox cases that developed near MeUahoysvillo somo weeks ago, was iu town yesterday. He reports the East Rockingham cases all as so far convalescent that ho now expects to release thoni from quarantine within tho next week or two.  In order that tho house in which the parties wore cared for, thoir wearing apparel, etc., might all bo thorough^ lv disinfected, tho county yesterday placed at Dr. Yancoy's disposal the Kuhn Formaldohydo Generator which was purchased and used a few years ago during tho smallpox out break in this county near Elkton. By the proper ubo of this generatror it is said that every gorm of tho disease which may lurk in a building or in garments can bo complolely destroyed.  It will bo recalled that Michael Pirkey, of noar McGaheysville, developed Binallpox somo woo Us ago. Tho caso was promptly detected and reported by Dr. Yancey and proper measures wore at once adopted for preventing its spread. The result was that it was confined to Mr. I'ir-koy's home, and no others than a few members of his immediate family contracted tho disease.  Farmers' Institute.  The Farmers Institute committee has arranged to hold an Institute in Winchester, Va., on February 24 and 25, JSKM. Tho program will consist of essays on topics of interest to all farmers, stockmen, truckers, fruitgrowers, otc., interspersed with music and resitations. Program will he furnished for publication as soon as completed. EDWARD L. IRISH,  Secretary.  BOY SEVERELY BURNED.  Three-Year-Old Son of John Hottle Met With Painful Accident.  The threo-year old son of Mr. .John Hottle,who resides on tho Port Republic road, about midway between Port Republic and Goods Mill, was severely, but not fatally, burned Monday about noon, while playing around tho (Ire where tho servant girl was washing. Anothor son, about five years of ago, who was playing noar, bravely fought tho flames, and, together with tho girl, succeeded in extinguishing them before tho frightened mother who was in tho upper story of tho house near by, and had heard the screams of the children, could reach them.  Tho little follow was badly burued about tho face, arms, and over tho right side. Tho clothing was almost burned from tho body before the flames could bo oxtingdished. It is almost a miraclo that ho escaped being fatally burned. He is boing attended by Dr. Frank Miller, of Good's Mill, and ut last accounts was doing very well.  Where Do Yon Eat?  Wo havo a first-class restaurant attached to our bar at tho old place on North Main street. Oysters in every style. Anything seasonable that you may desiro to eat you will find here and it will bo properly cooked "and daintily served. Wo think we know what tho public wants. Como and Bee if we meet your ideas.  KAYANAUGH BROS.  EARTHQUAKE SHOCK  Felt in Dillortüit Sortions of This County.  MANY RELATE EXPERIENCES.  Earthquakes Can Now bo Added to tho Manv Attractions of the Shenandoah Valley.  It is now the belief of many people, especially among those living in tho country away from the constant, Noise of town life, that, this county was visited by <■;irtlupiake shocks on Monday last which repeat) d themselves from time to time between the hours of 10-.'ID a. m. and I p. in.  Such a report, when llrst spoken of yesterday was treated somewhat in the light of a joke, as it. was suspected it had its origin in newspaper reports of the earthquake that visited portions of .Missouri, Kentucky and Illinois on Sunday evening last. All ideas, however, of it-i being a hoax was soon dispelled by tho statements of many persons from the country who came into town during the day and reported their experiences.  Mr. Noah Beery, who re-ides near Kdom, had ridden out into his field yesterday morning where the hands were plowing. and, while there, he had his attention first attracted to the matter by hearing a succession of deep, grumbling sounds of greater or less duration. The sounds wero very distinct, at times and repeated themselves from time to timo during tho day. Mr. Beery noticed no vibrations other than those of sound.  Mr. Thomas Martin, who resides upon a farm a short listance north of here, repeatedly heard a roaring noise during the day, and was totally unable to account for it except upon the theory that it either accompanied or proceeded an earthquake shook in «omo wotioii of tint country.  Messrs. David Bearp and Lather Andes were frequently attracted by distinct and unmistakable rumbling sounds, as though of distant thunder. They found that others in their neighborhood had heard it quito as distinctly as they did. And so it was with many others who might he meutioneud.  Mr. Peter Kehcrd, who resides on tho Warm Springs Pike, but a short distance south of town, felt, or rather heard, tho shocks with more or less distinctness. Tho only, persons, so far as known, who'noticed it especially here in town was .Miss Nannie Huffman. Miss Hutl'man is visiting her sister, Mrs. James VanLcar, on Kast Market street. She was attracted and rather startled by the sounds several times in the afternoon at about ~ o'clock', and said she felt distinct, vibrations of the earth and house as though both wore rocking. When Vtr. VanLcar returned in the evening from his store she was surprised to learn lie had not been attracted by anything of tho sort.  It is supposed tho noises and shock wero not decisive enough to be distinctly noticeable to many here amid the noises of the town.  D. II. Wisman has about, completed his now house ou South street. This is oho of the new thoroughfares, which promises to be in a short time one of the leading residence streets of the city. *  «07  Money received, taken care of and interest paid in the Savings Department of the  Rockingham National Bank, Harrisonburg, Va.  è «  « «  0  ^^^^ ^ ooo^o ♦♦♦♦   

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