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   Harrisonburg Daily News Record (Newspaper) - May 23, 1974, Harrisonburg, Virginia                                Weather In Brief Chonce Of Showers Two Sections 32 Pages Vol. 77, No. 197 Associated Press Features & Pliotofax Service Harrisonburg, Virginia, Thursday, May 23, 1974 f=or Business or 9700 News Dspartment-Dlal Ten Cents Nixon Answer To Subpoena: No Tapes Now Or In Future Storm Center John McLaughlin, a Jesuit priest and advisor to the President, has become the focal point of a great deal of controversy of late. Here, he is seen accusing Rep. Jerome Waldie of mailing impeachment petitions at government expense. Saying that he was speaking for the President, McLaughlin told a Chicago news conference Wednesday that Waldie should disqualify himself from the House Judiciary Committee, now studying the impeachment question. Meanwhile, in Boston, the regional provincial of the Jesuit Fathers of New England announced Wednesday that McLaughlin was being called bacl( to Boston for "prayer and reflection." The Father has been an outspoken defender of President Nixon's moral leadership. Syria-Israel 2 Obstacles Away JERUSALEM, Israel (AP) - A senior U.S. official said Wednesday two major obstacles remain to a Syrian-Israeli disengagement pact - Syria's resistance to thinning out its forces defending Damascus, and the size of a United Nations force to man the buffer zone. Although substantial progress has been made toward an agreement, he said, the gap on the two main issues still is "pretty wide." The official added that Secretary of Valley Deafhs Mrs. Ethel Louise Barb, 62, of Rt. 2, Mt. Jackson. Mrs. Beulah Margaret Ray, 69, of Timberville. Details on page 32 state Henry A. Kissinger has gained substantial agreement on where the Golan Heights line would be drawn, an exchange of prisoners from the October war and the status of the U.N. group. Kissinger returned here Wednesday night after meeting for 3^ hours in Damascus with Syrian President Hafez Assad. He plans to return to Washington this weekend - with or without final settlement - and if total agreement is not reached, will "let everybody take a breather for a week or two," the official said. Earlier in the day, on the flight to Damascus from Israel, the same official said Kissinger might invite Syrian and Israeli technical experts to Washington to complete the details or leave American specialists in the region. WASHINGTON (AP) - President Nixon flatly rejected on Wednesday the House Judiciary Committee's latest subpoena for tapes and documents and said he would do the same on any such future demands. Nixon wrote Chairman Peter W. Rodino, D-N.J., that he must "respectfully decline" the impeachment panel's subpoenas for 11 more tapes of Watergate discussion and the President's daily scheduling diaries. That decision applies to "such further subpoenas as may hereafter be issued," Nixon said. "It's a mistake," declared lUinois Rep. Robert McClory, one of the committee's Republican members. "We're all disappointed in the lack of cooperation." "He's telling us in flat terms the coverup continues, "said Rep. George E. Danielson, D-Calif. "We'll just file it away and consider it another impeachable offense," said Rep. William L. Hungate, D-Mo. Nixon's balk at the subpoenas - whose deadline expired at 10 a.m. Wednesday - was his second rebuke to the conunittee within hours. The panel was informed late Tuesday night that the President would hand over a partial transcript of one discussion in response to a separate request for dozens of tapes relating to the ITT antitrust settlement and milk price cases. The President's chief lawyer, James D. St. Clair, then delivered the chief executive's answer to the Watergate subpoena at 11 a.m. Wednesday. Nixon wrote that "It is clear that the continued succession of demands for additional presidential conversation hat become a never-ending process, and that to continue providing these conversations in response to the constantly escalating request would constitute such a massive invasion into the confidentiality. of presidential conversations that the institution of the presidency itself would be fatally compromised." The President also repeated an earlier offer "to answer, under oath, pertinent written interrogatories, and to be interviewed under oath by you and the ranking minority member at the White House." St. Clair generally declined comment on the decision, telling reporters that he, "simply delivered a letter from the President to the chairman." Nixon asserted again in the letter that he had given the committee the full story of Watergate when he released the edited transcripts of a number of conversations April 30. The tapes of most of those talks also had been subpoenaed, and the panel notified Nixon that the edited versions were not sufficient to comply with that order. The President also is fighting District Judge John J. Sirica's order Monday for him to turn over 64 tapes sought by Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski. Jaworski revealed the White House had claimed in that dispute that the special prosecutor could not take the President to court, a disclosure which prompted the Senate Judiciary Committee to declare Tuesday its support for Jaworski and his independence. In another Senate development, the Watei-gate Committee voted 5-0 to grant inmiunity from prosecution to Texas lawyer Jake Jacobsen in an attempt to get him to testify about an alleged $10,000 dairy industry bribe to former Treasury Secretary John B. Connally. Connally has denied taking the money. The House committee members spent three hours in closed session on Wednesday morning and listened to one of the tapes it ah-eady has on hand - a conversation late in the afternoon of March 21, 1973, among the President, John W. Dean III, H, R, Haldeman, and John D. Ehrlich-man. They also listened to a dictabelt recording of the President's recollection of all the events of March 21, the day he has said he first learned of the Watergate cover-up and payments of hush money. Rep. Charles B. Wrangel, D-N.Y., commented that on the dictabelt "he just says that Dean told him and he doesn't seem to think it is very serious." On Tuesday, committee members had listened to the tape of the first March 21 meeting. It was during that conversation that there were repeated discussions of the hush money demands and what might be done. After hearing the tape many committee members described it as the most damaging to the President that they had heard so far in the impeachment inquiry. 8(7/ Signing AP wiraplwte President Nixon scrutinizes his own signature on the Disaster Relief Act Wednesday after signing ceremonies in the Oval Office of the White House. Looking on, from left are Pete Domenici, R-N.M., Bailey Guard of the Senate Public Works Committee, Senators Howard Baker, R-Tenn., Quentin Burdick, D-N.D., and Jennhigs Randolph, D-W.Va., and Rep. M. G. Snyder, R-Ky. Godwin Appoints Black RICHMOND (AP) - Governor Mills Godwin appointed a black to a high administrative post Wednesday, criticized the moral tone of the White House tape transcripts and said Virginians should continue to conserve gasoline. These were some of the highlights of a wide-ranging news conference which began with Godwin announcing the ap-pomtment of James B. Spurlock Jr., of Roanoke as assistant to Secretary of Human Affairs Otis Brown. After assuming his fuUtime duties July 1, Spurlock will be the highest ranking black in the stated administration since William B. Robertson, also of Roanoke, served as an assistant to former Gov. Linwood Holton for minority affairs. Spurlock, 38, a graduate of A&T College in Greensboro, N.C., and employment coordinator for Appalachian Power Go. for. the past two years, will be paid $21,400 in his new post. Godwin said the state "is indeed for- Fire Engulfs Chelsea CHELSEA, Mass. (AP) - Fire swept rapidly through a four-block industrial area of this harbor city on Wednesday, the second major blaze in the city in eight months. The flames were out of control for nearly four hours and threatened to spread into nearby businesses and dwellings. Of the eight buildings in the area, seven were destroyed and one damaged. l^st October, a $100 million blaze left 1,100 homeless in a 20-block section of this city north of Boston. No damage estimate was immediately available on Wednesday's fire. City records put the assessed valuation of the eight buildlings involved at $341,000, Firemen were hampered by chemical explosions and low water pressure, long a Fir^ro^�wat lse8 While waiting for more hose and better water pressure. SAFEWAY Yellow corn 10 ears 89c TRASH COUUECTION For Broadway-Tlmberville and surrounding areas who normally get service on Mon.. pickup will be Saturday, May 25 rattier ttian Monday May 27 due tohioliday. Mick's Disposal Service. problem in Chelsea. Six firemen were treated for smoke inhalation. Police Chief Abraham Burgin said the fire may have been touched off by sparks from a workman's torch igniting flammable materials inside the American Barrel Co., a maker of wooden and metal barrels. Officials said chemicals inside the factory exploded, blowing off the building's roof, collapsing an outside wall, and sending flames leaping to the rooftops of seven other buildings. Only a four-lane street separated the fire scene from a row of small, wooden and brick businesses and dwellings. Firemen sprayed water on the buildings to keep them from going up in flames. Residents were evacuated, as were workmen in the industrial buildings. Whitmers Tires & Service Jetzon Steel Belted Radial Tires in Wednesdays ad stiould tiave read: Size AR70-13 only $38.28 plus 2.17 FET i, Exctisnge. CLOSING NOTICE Monday, May 27, 1974 being a legal Holiday (Memorial Day), all Banks of ttie City and County will be closed. See adv. on back page. tunate in having a man of his caliber willing to join state service." The governor said he had read only news accounts of the White House tape transcripts and these had not changed his view that President Nixon "is entitled to a presumption of innocence until this presumption is removed by credible evidence." But he conceded that "the tone of conversation and the moral questions raised are detrimental to the President and some members of his administration." While saying, "I do not think the President should resign," Godwin expressed the belief that "we ought to get on with the impeachment proceedings and get this matter cleared up." v' Continued on page 21, col. 3 Today's Index Calendar........................Page 14 Comics..........................Page 31 Crossword.......................Page 6 DearAbby.......................Page 4 Heloise..........................Page 5 Jeane Dixon.....................Page 7 Local News......................Page 17 Markets.........................Page 14 Rural Rockingham...............Page 18 Sports...........................Page 26 Sunday School...................Page 25 TVUstings......................Page 13 Weather.........................Page 2 What's to Name..................Page 24 CLOSING NOTICE Ttie Daily News-Record Business Office and Advertising Department will be closed all day Saturday, May 25 and Monday, May 27. Ttie advertising deadline for Tuesday, May 28 will be noon, Ttiursday, May 23. Ttie deadline for Wednesday, May 29 will be noon, Friday, May 24. Tti^e will be no publication of ttie Daily Nevw-Record, Monday, May 27.   

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