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Harrisonburg Daily News Record Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1924 - Page 1

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Publication: Harrisonburg Daily News Record

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   Harrisonburg Daily News Record (Newspaper) - October 3, 1924, Harrisonburg, Virginia                                 ,>t :  it  Hér^ Say Many Valley Prompted  LWmpK^^^ of  CHARGES THAI FALL HOT GET ALL OF THE SLtT^ MONEY.  TO Hap SMITH IN NEW YORK  SfÉpçratic Candidate Say$ G. 0. P. Administration is Famed for its "Alibis."  (By The A-ooiated Pr^wl  New York. Oct. 2.—John W. Davis, Democratic nominee for President, speaking in historic Madison Square Qarden, where he was nominated last' summer, tonight was given a roiiBing /iiemohstration whw Ae proriftled to' /take 9ff "his coat; feSt, tie .and what else was serviceable to**' belt elect A1 Smith Governor of NpW York State."  Mr. Davis made the statement, after thanking Gov. Smith for the promise the latter made at ihe National Convention that he would take oft' his coat and vest ani work lor the election of the nominee. Mr. Davla and the Governor entered the hall together a'nd were greet-^ by a flag-waving crowd thtjt .flllco every seat. It was the opening gui of tho Democratic campaign in thi' city.  Referring to Theodore Rc ■ • ^felt's characterisation of the De. cratic party as Insincere in their it ..ibises, Mr. Davis , said "how many ii.mem-ber the glowing and briiliani ¡0rom-Ises that ^Ignallzed the year iii,the campaign Of 1920? Who wab there in that year of grace who wanted a promlae of anything that couldn't produce it? . •  "it Is not surprising that some of thji^e promts, at least, the Republican part^r did not perform. Bui on« jpiomiSe'they made was performed 'In j'fttter and in spirit. They promised'tb give this country an ad-minUit^tlpn of law in tft ilj^ executive rin. ('.. i- enUrely (rop til.' .j,Oii!in'iV..fitt-.on  - That proAiise the-»»^ iiioirJisisii^ft, kept w^Wiidk ahe ibeimat clti-liaiiiFe bluihed with shame to ilet iilii-jtbirertf^^ held ud to humfUatldn) t)Oth at home and abroad one Industry lias flourished and that dustry Iwi lieen the alibi manu-¡tilVfnfg liid'UBtry.  "Sii^Wtal^'Fall started with a grraild'alibi—he had $100.000 lent him by a friend. And now I see in the -public press that not only Doh-eny's. satchel and Sinclair'B |26,000 bond found their way Into this coffer, but there Is |90,000 hidden away up in Canada coming from this samo fruitful soui'ee. Secretary Denby had hiB alibi;  i"Attoniey General Daugherty had his alibi. And his alibi was that his ^Ight hand, Jeff Smith, did not know what his left hand, Gaston B. Means, was doing."  Tomorrow Mr. Davis will go to New Jersey wherel^he will make four addresses—-Trenton, Princeton, Elizabeth and Newark.  . /The inauguration of motor tourist service ,through. Virginia,, and the Shenandoah Valley by the internationally-known tourist agencies, Thomas Cook & Son and Seven Seas Travel Service, was prompted by ,thè large number of Inquiries regarding th^ Shenandoah Valley, It was stated last night . by W. J Wilson and J. H. Holmes, of New York, representatives of the two agencies, who arrived in Harrisonburg.  Messrs. Wilson and Holmes are "pathfinders" for the tours. They aie now making the, trip to study the possibilities ot permanent establishment of the tours, the scenèry, the roads, the hotels and other features.  "In addition to the foreign sea tours we arrange," said Mr. Holmes, "we conduct automobile tours in the  UnitâdlffilStbs." 'We have had .1 through New England for some time The tourists are carried In-seven,, passenger cars. The whole trip Is mapped out for them. In the New England tours, many of our men explain the historic spots And other Interesting sections, as they know the ground throughly. We will not attempt that feature to any great extent here.  "ThU automobile tours will be. conducted In the fall and spring months. 'HVe do not run them In the summer months."  Mr. Holmes and Mr. Wilson were met here by Frank L. Sublett and Dan P. Wine, of the Shenandoah Valley, Inc., and were given an arm-•ful of literature on the Valley. They will go to Luray todây and Will probably go to Skyland as well as the Luray Caverns.  WESTHIIMPIIUS GUT OFF  Ball yiaxk Upi^^ething Torrent.  Himdied't Boa  lEAT DP TO DJ PLOT (WED 10  (By The Richmond, Valley mánüf  FOK mr DEUVERY  Higfhest Price Since 1921—Foreign Demand Apparently Cause Of «Rise  (By The Associated Press) Chicago. Oct. 2.—rWheat on the Chicago Board of Trade rose today to $1.50 a bushel for May delivery. This represented an overnight advance of more than 3 cents a bushel with all deliveries of wheat and rye here touching a new high price record for the season. Urgency of for-.eign demanci for breadstuffs was the chief apparent cause .  /Trading on a big scale was in progtess in all the grain pits, but over thé tumult of bidding scattered cheers were heard* when wheat hit th^ goal of $1.50. Meanwhile rye' had oiuade a sensational leap of 5 cents a. bulisel in price and was selling. S 1.3.2 a bushel. May delivery, ns eomoared with $1.27 last night.  (TPoday's .price of- $1.60 for May wheat, ia the tlli{i1i«at reached here sinQft jf2.I. On ilaet dav of  TIE UP ELECTION  Cllailiinftn Butler Says Democrats And La Follette In Deal For Congress to Elect  THREE lUaROIIDS COME TO RESCUE OF VIRGINMTREXSURY  IN SËSSION AT «TUNTA  m  (By tka Associated Press.)  Richmond, Oct.' ! 2.—Three railways have come to the rescue of Virginia's depleted Treasury. Fnan-ehlse tastes to the amount of $1,-3^6«756.A7 have been paid, the taxes were not due until Nov. 1. .  Thé Norfolk and Western paid In $788,119.8« the Richmond, Fred-erloksburg and Potomac, $156,179.-, 14^ àn4 the Chesapeake and Ohio i482,.487.or.  Émo ooyfiK^  TOES irnk 0PEBATI0»  r Cheyenne, Wyo., Oct. 2—Gov. WIl-B. Jtosa, ot Wyoming, died tor/a .w^ek after he ba4 undergone an operation for apjiendicitis.  Respited from septic phlebi-"âH*» Wblcâ had been manifest from .the time of the operation.  Qovi^rnor was 61 years old.  "^OtBOW , OUT great An-Säe. JOS.  (By the Associated Press.)  Atlanta, Oct. 2.—The diplomatic session of the Pan-American Congress closed the second day of the four-day program of the gathering here of rep resent'atlves of 2l Latin American nations a#>d delegates from all over the United States, meeting with the object of promoting better commercial relations between the Americans.  At tonight's session, the diplomatic and consular representatives, by special permission of their respective goverdments, addressed the con-gr^ with their subject "The Commercial Relation ot the Countries of Atmerica aa( to Import, fixport. Trade Balances, Barriers and Present Op-portunitiea."  JUBY GOES TO BED:  KO VEBDICT m TAB CASE.  Frederick, M'd., Oct. 2.—The jury in the case of Harry Leatherman, charged with applying the tar and feathers to Dorothy Grandon, retired tonight without renderin ga verdict. The Jury was given the case this afternoon.  WOMAH ELECTED MAYYOB  _____.„OTPPEB  Benefit iPf^W^^ Aid,  Thuridar ilifht, Oct. le, at Walter KooâÛi'l ír'íralnin«. xome the 17th.  Raleigh, N. C., Oct. 2.—Wilmington is the Urst North Carolina city to have a won^in for Mayor. The city coramissiohers there have Just elected Mrs. James H. Cowan to fill the unexpired term of her hiisband, who was Mayor for a number of years. .»:  PIE AND CAKE iSAIE  Missionary Group No. 2 of the Methodist Church wll hold a pie and cake sale, at Wm^ B. Dutrow's Store, Saturday morning, Oct, 4, at ten o'clock. 10-3—Ätc.  (By The Associated Press) Washington, Oct. 2.—^A coalition between Democratic and La Follette forces, particularly in the Western States with the evident purpose to force the election of a President Into Congress was charged here today hy William M. Butler, chairman of the Republican National Committee.  Mr. Butler, with Senator McCor-mick, of Illinois, conferred with President CooHdge today at the White ^use. Mr. Butler said.he went over the general political situation with the President and reiterated that he did not (believe Mr. Cool-idge had changed his plan to remain at the White House throughout the campaign.  The chairman did not go apeciflcal-ly into the evidence which he said he had received of a coalition. It was jnore or leas on the surface, he Wd was wi^acul ^li the East In Jfome secUoni m well as In tho Weit.;, •  l;haracterizlflg Mr. Bryan as a Près (¿■ntlal candidate. Mr. Butler ranked Senator La Follette next to the Democratic vice PresidMitial as the strongest opponent of .'the President and John W. Davis, Democratic nominee, last.  Mr. Butler said pli^s were underway to intensify tie Republican campaign between now and election.  ivMcad Damage to aÄ State.  Boclated Pre.g8) i^i 2.—The Shockoe nhng district of  Richmond toi ht waS covered to  feet with the rag-of the James river, automobile trafflft nk" suspended this lOt been resumed, ;ers were beginning  the depth of |ng flood wat< Trolley : ) and throu|h'jthe afternobnihad though the w^ to recede.  The high.^vjtir level reached within oilte inc oiP the murk set last May, when-'th ¿I'uge reading was 21 feet. Mayo Wtind. whore tho Virginia Leagu l&ll park Ib located, was a seethini midstream current, only the {op ibf rfes and the grandstand being vl b^e,  The, bridgt Westhampton, a suburb, was ct ,off from the village by a broi  mond, was th the city and tl James.  Piedmont VifellCla, tonight still checking  had been unab ports on condll|Di|s ot bridges, but damage would thousands of d|i conbtruction fiu damage.  fexpanse of  swift  water more thjn; two feet deep. Mayo bridge, lining to South Rich-|ole link between district across the  was  le^ damage to roads  and property: I ghway officials hree  jto secure full rereads and tifnated that the into hundreds of Projects under led the biggest  LEAGUE AS  V.M. I.'S RYIN6 pÓRON TACiaES 6ÌQR6ÌA TECH  CBy The ASSOCIAI Ml PireM)  Lexington, Oct. 2.— V M. L's Fly-Iny Squadron is now 'n the way to Atlanta where they v 111 play their third game of the se son with the Yellow Jackets of Geo gla Tech Saturday. Coaches Clark» n and Raffer-  an, "with 28 Mianager Holt >f the weekly  ty and Trainer Quin members of the squad, atiii a ' replresentative neXspaper. left Lexiijgton tonight in a special car hea^d for the South.  While the Varsity ij giving battle at Atlanta, the V. M I. . freshmen will be opening their peason against Augusta Military Acwemy and furnishing excitement fir those who cannot see the big pght in the Georgia capital.  WIND HAS BLOWH ^ MDCH  ooBir Dowir,  180-8INCLAIB OA^lSc  Best at any price. STAPLES MOTOR CO. 2tc.  '^bva. you aifcr^ to w die* wliexe. : tik« Mñatage of <mr An^Bumoii S^dKr^ il «he last day. JOB. tEï &  fSmm SUIPER CLOYEB HILL  by Ladles' Aid Society. Noz 26.— 9-^6.10-3-4 : ll-2a-24-2g-2gR,  PLAY BALL! Ton can get aU^tiw jpune over a Frioey are HOT kiirt. Come » Headqvarttti. B. IHEY < .aad let's t^ it OTWr^ttc.  AïïCTIOHhâlÂ'ï-  4, 7:80 CHioeg  jBosie^.^ rtfc, tto. at  yr^êt iiá§it': •  Massanetta Spring^. Oct. 2.—^The raiofail Sunday and ilght'^and Monday, accompanied bsji high winds, did much damage to the corn fields by blowing the stall» down. The atoi-m reminded man]iy;pf the older residents of the flood! of 1870 that fell at this time of the month.  S. B. Wisman and c aughter. Miss Stella, have returned Irom a week's vl^lt in the home of lli^ soHTln-Iaw and daughter, Mr. ant Mrs. J. E. Ck>od, at Bernard, Onitee County.  Froat has appeared 4n several oc-caslons hut no materl^ damage, reported^ ^^¡¿^  BALLY DAY Pl^BAH  Mabel Memorial ChaiMi., Sunday, 9:30 a. m. /The pubUe Is «ordlally Invited, - 10-3;;^^..^ '.j. . n  OTsi^ isinpFEB/Kittag^^^ Satniday Nightj;ODt. 4tb  Benefit of .Band.  Front—14-27-1-4.  BEST AT ANT HSiCE *  19c—Sinclair Gaer:;>19c STAPLES MOTOR W. 10-3—2tc. ■ ■ : ,  S. B. OIBBONSi^kia»,  Meeting of S.' B. GlIlMtii« Camp, Saturday. Oct., 4, at i:30>'lff.*, room 604. First National^ Bahk Bldg.— itf.'  If yon have cuU  liMi--"" ^  Geneva, JOct^ ¡2.—Ihe .fl<th assembly of the League of\Nations ended its labors today by unanimously adopting a rwolution treconuneiding that all staÇea, accept the protocol of arbitratlton and security.  Apart frpqt the elaboration of the protbcpl for the peaceful settlenent of international ' disputes, the outstanding feature of the session was the Insiatence of the delegates that economic problems popularly regarded as Belonging exclusively to thfl domestic Jurisdiction of states, must be sMved on an international basis If all causes of war really would bo removed. . /  The idea (behind the movement, as explained to the Associated Press by the Jurists tonight, is the  League of Nations, having decided to outlaw all war, logically must turn'to air possible causes bf\con-fllct and endeavor to eradicate them. Led by the growing spirit of internationalism, as a convpliment to na-tlpnallsm and stale sovereignty, the Jurist contended world opinion now demands that certain vlt^; problems affecting thé'world as aWwhole, such as immigration and equable flistri-butlon of raw teaterlal, .can no longer be left to the catÁlBive control oiF áttt state or st^es, ^t must be" examined with a tlew i^, their equitable settlement li the best interest of all, so that Economic causea, of war may be eiinHlnated.  FINDS $87.000 HAO. BAG  Martinsburg, W. V^.. Oct. 2.—Lee Ambrose, Baltimore and Ohio freight «ngineer, today conitrmed a report that he found an flMpened mail Rackr along the tracks between Raw-lings and Keyset, W; Va., last Thursday morning while taking a freight train ,-westward.  He stopped the train, picked tip the sack.and took It to Keyser, where he turned it over to a ticket a«ent. He was informed-by other railroad men that it waa found to contain $87,000 in note and silver, which was .turned oyer jLo Government ofilcials.  BALLY DAY FBO^teAU  Mabel Memtoriai C%agl«I, Sunday, 9:30 a. m. /The pubUo Is cordially invited. 10-3—2tC. ,:  WHY NOf  take ^ihat week-end trip to fWi^H 'ins):Qn in a new car? Our rates offer you the cheapest transportation, you can, get. Call us for. Inform«-tion,. or drop into our new. attractive quartehi. Excellent service and comfortable cars. Southern U-DBIVE-IT, 201 E. Market, Harrisonburg. phone 317.—10-8^2tpi.  Ladie* $8.50 Brwi^ Wool Sweatasi rednoed to Tlie Fair Store.—Ite.  BASlffiBAIL ^ I.«:«  Band Flays at Katinee and Night to Help Fun4—Its Program Hire.  , The Royal Scotch Highlanders Band—said to rank with the famious Marine Band for its musical talent —will come to Harrisonburg today. It will play here three times— At the Rotary Club Luncheon at I P. M.;  At Matinee at New Virginia Theatre at 3:30 P. M.; * At night at Thtatre at 8:15 (p. m.  Proceeds from the noted band's concerts here will go to the Crippled Children Fund. Henry Ney, chairman of the Crippled Children Committee,- declared last night at $400 Is needed to pay hospital and medical expenses of a number of Rockingham boys and girls who are now being treated with the liope of restoring them to normal activities in life.  JThe band iplayed last night in Winchester. Hu«h Duifey, Principal of the Handiey Schools and n musician of note himself, declared over the telephone last night that it was one of the "most wonderful musical organizations he has ever heard." "It is apelndid," he added. Two thousand people heard the matinee at Winchester by the band at the Handiey Schools, and at night the Empire Theatre was packed to hear it again. The crowds were the largest that ever turned out ttr attend a nmsical entertainment.  The band is coming here in a f60,000 P.ullman car presented it by the city of St. Petersburg,-Fla. This car will be open for inspection from 2:30 to 6 P. M. It is regarded as one ef the most handsomely equipped railroad cars th%t runs over steel ^iaiis.' ■ , -  tltged Caìlìag jM V^M Omgiess läti^l^gatii^i  Out Cxòolàìlbeit. c,^ .  • "'I'^ii.  rty ÄJarch—  AftemooÀ.  I., Ohimes ci Llbfft Gadlni.  2. Overture, Bells of Saxony— Rosina. ^  i 3. Cornet Solo, Remembrance of Liberatti  Mr; Ernest Paulsen.  4. A7G]Ad (^irl—iHerman.  B-Parade of the Wooden Sold(erB.  6. Harp Solo, Endr^ring Young Charms  Mr. John lauletta  6. Nlghtengalj and Frog—^Eilen-burg.  7. Soprano Solo, Operetta Medley  Miss Dora Hilton  8. Euphonia Solo, Southern Melodies—Mantia.  Mr. ^bbe Van Col  9. Grand Selection of Scottish Folk Songs and Dances.  10. Whistling and Bird Imitations  Mr. Harold Stockton.  II. Descriptive, The Highland Serenade—^Buccolowl. '  12. Tenor Solo,>:<  Mr. Bobhyijprolller The Star Spantfiod Banner. ^ >  1. Heart Oat?%lfy—Weldon"'  2. Overture, William Tell— Rosini. '  3. Cornet Solo, Hynclath Polka— Henry -  Mr. Ernest Paulsen  4. La Paloma—iYradler.  6. Haro Solo, Sextette from Lucia  Mr. John Lauletta  6. Woodlawn Cucco and Frog — Wagner. j,  7. Soprano Solo,' Operetta Medley No. 2  Miss Dora Hilton.  8. Minuet—Beethoven.  9. Whistling, and Bird Imitations  Mr. Haroid Stockton.  10. Reminesces of the Old Plantation—Chambers...  11. Tenor Solo  Mr. Bobby Broiller The Star Spygled Banner  EPISCOPAL CÉiàcH WILL  EAT CAXP SVPPEB SATDBDAY  The congregation of the Episcopal Church Is invited to eat a camp, supper with the Church students of the Teachers College, on the Rectory lawn, Saturday evening, October 4th. Come at five. ■ - >  BiGEWATER QUE  Sheriff Dove and Deputies Help to Calm Down Near-Bioters Wed-. nesday Night.  (Special to Daily News-Record)  Bridgewater, Oct. 2 — Brldgewa-ter, usually the most peaceful, of towns, is back to normal once more and apparently the trouble which caused the riot between |ome whites and blacks for several .dyas and nights is Qver. Mayor 0. A. Arey, ■aid tonight that hé looked for no more disturbances but that the town ofllcials were prepared for ânv emergency.  As a precautionary measure. Sheriff C. Wv Dove and several deputies came here last night and remained for some time but there' wére no further^outbreaks. Only thé usual crowd of loafers was on ihe streets and. the same was also trtl(^ of tonight. Many wild reports were in circulation last night but all were groundless, the riot seen^in'g to have ended Ti^esda^ night.  Mayor Arey. attributes the whole trouble ifo bad feftlingr which i axlsted lor some time,« Wl^éen '«er-, tain fainloQs of the whitèilandi coiotr;  been settled.  Imview of the fact that between 125,and 160 men^anid boys were In the mob which attacked 10 or negroes. It (s cons^ered reniarka' that the results were not far morev serious. One white boy slightly wounded in the lëg and a half dozen neeroes beaten up was the extent of the damage.  (By the Aasoelated  Washington, Oct. World Series will go onii.'' standing that base ball to its foundation today by' wind succession -of. «rowing out . of the Jimmy O'Conneli» young Ifl outfielder, to bribe Philadelphia shortatop. In ^^ that decided the National-pennant race tor tl^e Qiantiir«>''  This, was the^.deciarar ' of Kenesaw Mountain commlSBloner of basel made after a hectic which fresh chargea CrConneil, who had for all time from the ga^'' with Cosy Dolan. Oiant: cused of Instigating th%X plot, and during .whicb basebaU offlclals. inclnC^ dent Ban Johnson, Of tbeCi x«^gue, and Prea^dMt fuijs, of the Pit«;htirg the aeries should he iC, ri^uit of tl)fe soan^  „ . No Oaien ii .  "So far as^i^am, oloud noir hangv i^v of the Giant in the  to the World mtitt ton on Satttstfay-'* - - ^  Charges and damt4t j thick ^d fast th^ ^ '^hey cniminajfjB« In/j,^ at .Cl^cago of ^ foh  ican Uà '^Aerleá .and  iegéd  m Ne 176,000  STEAUIK ME HERE  AÑ& 'toniqht  ich Highlanders Band.  TODAY  the Royal Scdicii Buy a tlicfcet ii*w^»-HWiBefaester de-iliililW iWliir^e h«s499«tei!4ay.  New Plaid ttatexial. the latest, at eSo yard. The Bkir Store.—Itc.  Fouhd^ guilty of the theft of a bicycle, Joseph Lucas, 16 year old son if Mf. and Mrs. P. D. Lucas, of near 'New Market, spent laat night in Jail to give Mayor Shefltey I/. Devler time to decide his sentence. ' The hearing was'concluded late yesterday.  Lucais was charged with having in his possession a bicyclé belonging to Charles Weaver, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Weaver. T^e Weaver lad recognized his wheel one ' day during tne fair when lAicas rode It to to't^ The police were notî11:M.  The New Market youth maintained that he found 4hé bicyclé , along the road near his home and that he 'dliii not take the wheel until after it been left iii^jB for two or^ ttii'èe' days. His parents and brotMr sob-stantiated this testimony.  « V - ■ 'ir ' V  STEAL GEMS PBOy HOTEL  Toledo, Ohio, Oct;, 8.—^Policri were notified today that Jewels valued at about $100,000 has J>een stolen from a hotel room here last night. The Jewels, the property of Bock, Lewis & Co., Buffalo, were in a trunk belonging to Max Lewis, representative of the company. The robbery Is the third ot its ki^fl in local hotels this year.  »Ill—■ I ' .  BEVIYAL AT WÉXERa CAIQI  On Monday, October 6. at We>«ra Cave, a revival meeting will bf^n; Rev. M. C. PuUin, pfMitor. Rev, J'.^ii, Early, |>astor at BHdgewater. wtU do the- preaching. Hours for ser-» vice, 7:30.—10-2-8tc.  "CAN HABDtt SELŒVE THEIB ÙWXVJE8"  It's no windlFtJPor nowfaexe hkífé  1a4 of 70S. HEY»* BONS AjnïMbÛ^^^S^^ ,  your boys school Wt ,try a pair of thçse for $1.98. We made  ---- áBd it will pay yon  before maWjig  ""éSONS.  •OHILDBBN  of the " neh'for th«v  Band. CwUl »>•  ......those  iBitohy«^!  m  - . ...  •auty and:___,,___  atorm that has shakeri t|u!lr| nothing else since fìì»^ scandal of imbuii charges he has ni»d$ mlssloner Landls. of his teammatea llèéi^è^'Lw» asserting that.'he 'waa liitol^" the "goat." ;  -^SeekO'C«  The most rnyi...,, whole situation, in' observers, ig the Conneil's action, ment when the^Oi of a sensational , looked like certain Baseball writers ed the game sal no question in played on the pointed out, p_ ,, game, scoring thiP:. Phillies who were/.w ded, simply hecatii^*^ played:  "The Ckai-'»^^^« (By The New f orJb-Connell, aiant''^ by Base Bal^ 'Ct...., last night aftw ¡had offered* a |S<M Sand ot^ Nitloittle to "tl game, today. 44[ made the •»goal members of the ,  were the fnstlgatoit ii^J plot. ' . .. .;  Coay Dolam Olaiili so was expelled ifa. Conneil's etifite Capt: Frank Ross Young:'air  cemlng the i»ibi adding that th^> domtand that the:  «>iH T  "They;_______  ypww .¿«tfleidicfr^ And» the goat.'^  k,. wt' • ' t^  been   

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