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Danville Bee: Wednesday, July 2, 1930 - Page 1

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   Bee, The (Newspaper) - July 2, 1930, Danville, Virginia                               I I WEATHER Virginia and jr. Fair and omewhBt Cooler y Fair With Moderate Friday Probably Fair and Somewhat Warmer. Everybody Reads DANVILLE PAPERS In Trading Area LEASED WIRB ASSOCIATED LEASED WIBE j ASSOCIATED PBESS The Next Step In DANVILLE PROGRESS Is Annexation FOUNDED 1899. NO. WEDNESDAY JULY 1930. TWO CENTS SENATE MEASURE NOW VETS GOES BACK LOWER HOUSE Amendment Sponsored by Senators Walsh and Connelly is Tacked On to Pension Bill Increasing Allowances to World War Partici- Democrats Line Up Higher Payments to War Veterans. July rates Increased by the senate in opposition to wishes ot President the compromise World war veterans' relief act went bact to the house today with speedy dispoi.tlon in conference predicted. Republican leaders there moved to disagree on the senate amend- increasing the maximum pen- sion for non-service connected dls- abllit es from 640 to a and sought to send the measure to conference at once. They were con- fident of more than enough votes to bring this about. Meanwhile a close watch was kept upon the White House lor any indi- cation of President Hoover's attitude toward the senate bill. There were hints the rates it contained so for incurred the chief executive's dis- pleasure that a veto wos threatened. Hoover Opposed After Mr. Hoover had vetoed Ihe Johnson-Rankin bill and the hoiue had sustained his action and then passed the. compromise it was bald at the White House tne president was opposed to anv In- crease in the rates It contained. The rates of the senate bill are the same as those of the Span'su- American war veterans' bill recen'lv enacted over Mr. veto A comparison of the senate End hsu-s all Senate House Disability Kate Kate No pension 820 S12 ...........83i' 818 850 860 S40 The increased rates ot the bill were added in an sponsored by Senators of I and Connallv. of both democrats. The u-hlch came late was 37 tj 26 The bill Itself was approved suj- eequently. 56 to 11. 27 Democrats _ Twenty-seven nine re- publicans and the one farmer-labor of 158 YEARS TO VISIT U. S. PLANE PASSES 500 HOUR MARK A PROBE N. Y. EN Coming to a prohibition country won't bother Zara Agha. or Istanbul. Turkey. For he says He has Rep. -Celler Urges Con- gress to Inquire Into the Status of Prohibition Under Administr'a tor Who Resigned Rather Than Be Laxity in Enforcement of Laws Charged to Re- tiring Official. July Prompt adoption of a resolution au- thorizing i house investigation of prohioitlon enforcement in New York city under Maurice Campbell urged today by Representative of that state. CORNELL EXPERIMENTER GETS ULTRA-VIOLET FROM ELECTRIC lived 158 tasting alco- Celler. ttc author of the measure nolle liquor. His forthcoming visit i In. question was anxious that It be considered before congress adjourns but was uncertain whether this could to the United States will be the interest of and he is to c.o- pear before various medical and scien- ce accomuLshed. tiflc societies He has promised to I Campbell i tenure of office ended bring certificates proving he was born j the Pronibition on May years before the American Revolution began. voted for the while the 26 opposing votes were all cast by as were the 11 votes cast against the bill on f nal pass-age. The bill would give World war veterans trie pensions regardless of whether they can prove their ailments to be the result of service. An amendment approved by the senate under which veterans who contracted ven- eral diseases while in the serv ce would be authorized to collect pen- sions for disabilities resulting An- 1H treasury to the justice the adminlstra- tor rather than be trans- I lerred to Bciton i i In leaving he asserted treas- urv ofiicUls were not sincere in their prohibition activities and that politics nail interfered with enforce- ment. Ac the same a federal grand Jury presentment accused him of laxity Indicated I Celler sa.d Campbell had retired runder conc'itlons Indicating j laxity in the enforcement of the Volstead act and the interference by New York republican politicians In the enforcement of that The investigation he uould be conducted by Judlciary er the entire period Campbell held office. With the Justice department get- ting accustomed to its new task of supervising dry law a measJie requested by Piesldent Cabins Crowded As Fish-j ing Season Opened At Daylight Tuesday The fishing season was opened _______ Wlldwood lake on July 1 All the I Hoover u means of Improving en- cabins were filled with members and j foroement etood approved their guests cn'the night of June 30 houae toda_ ana awaited the action and fishing started at daybreak on of the Senate. the following morning. So as to This was the bill to consolidate give all the anglers an equal I the border patrols of the immigra- large farm bell at one of the j and customs under au cabins was rung ut 4.15 a. m and I assistant stcretarj of the this was the signal for rising and also in charge of the coait guard starting the fishing season. it ii Intencccl to prevent the smug- At one cabin some of the occu-1 6ImS of aliens and centra- pants started at one minute j Dana merchandise midnight fishing for caught 45 before daylight. Gusto- E L Gunn was the first one _ _ bring tubercular patients within die benef is of the measure without ths requirement that they prove an case. Cost Senator of who opposed the increased esti- mated the senate bill would cost tns government S58.000.000 during the present fiscal year js compared with under the house bill. Walsh disputed the Penmylvanlan's but agreed the senate blil would be more expensive thai of the fiouse. and got one weighing a pound and a half at the second cast F W To-anas. caught the largest which measured 17 inches Louis Kaufman caught 18 before all over 13 Inches In lengtn. The lake now two years old and has The Been well slocked with black rock bream and aun a. total of fish of desirable species having The Been intro- duced A large crowd of members and their guests are expected to enjoy July 4 and 5- The lake covers 110 of land and has a depth in some parts of 14 feet. The site was largely swamp land and there was fair fishing in the creek and swamp before the dam built. The cluo has .1 membership of 56 and when the membership reaches 60 the mem- bership list will be c.osed. Looks To Hoube Rebuffed by the Senate in its de- sire thdf an additional S250.000 be appropriated for the general investi- gation of rhe Hoover law -enforce- the Administration looked to the house looay for suppoit for the proposal A resolution adopted by the rules committee to authorize such an ap- propriation held first place on the schedule o' the day's business and republican leaders were confident of its approval An item In the second bill to maJce this appro- priation was stricken out on a. point uf and after the adoption 01 the resolution it would be re-in- serted. The Senate granted the commis- sion SSO.OOj with the proviso that its acuvities be confined to a study ol the enforcement of the dry laws. President Hoover promptly announc- ed the full program ot the com- mission would be carried with lunds contributed from private sources.' Health-Giving Qualities of Light Demonstrated By Experiments Practiced On Chickens Raised Under Special Possibilities of Preven- tion and Cure of Disease Are Greatly Enlarged. Bj HOWARD W. BLAKESLEE I'rest Selene N July violet light from ordinary-size house electric bu.bs Is curing disease at Cornell This made public to- is the latest In artificial a practical forecast of re- turn of thr time when modern man may regain the constant ultra-violet environment under which the hu- man race developed The cave man got his ultra-violet out in the open. The CorneK work Indicates his des- cendents may get It from ordinary olze electric lights. The experiment clarifies a prediction 1-azarded recently by a tew advanced illuminating that even In the extremely small amounts of ultra-violet known be produced by ordinary tungsten there Is sufficient for without risk of over expo- sure. At CorneZi Dr. George H. Maughan has The Been raising chickens under elec- tric light bulbs the glass of which does not transmit ultra-violet With- out exception these chickens foiled to grow more than half were unable to stand became great- ly deformed and finally died of ric- kets unless given special care other every Rogers Says He's Left To Tackle Borah HUNTER ARE OPPOSES NORRIS MINKEAPOLIS. Minn July 2 Coolldge's sermonettes are running more to the spiritual cban thj political. He has laid off tariff and Uncle Jos in favor of divine guidance and sets rooi-5 store by eternal things than does the United States He to get back to the old early New England where. you wasn't you was buining somebody that was So It looks like I am left single handed to cope with Smoot and all material and tem- poral matters......... j Danville District Method- I ists in Two-Day Ses- j sion at Whitmell Excellent reports of splendid work j done by the Danville District conierence of the Confer- ence of tne MethodistE Episcopal featured the opening session of the 53nd annual meeting of the district conference held at Whitmell icsterday The conference was In session again today with much business to be transacted The reDori read at the conerence yesterday reflected the splendid work being done This report was not final j inasmucn as trm eight and t J months of this conference year had to be compared with the entire paic conference jear On the of f'gures presented It is that the Danville District will far surpass 1 st jear in Its work ijast year the district raised for Benevolences and already this year there has The Been raised Last J year the district gave S2.762 li a In adjoining pens were chickens rjised the same In detail except one. The single dif- ference one small electric of glass that transmits ultra-xiolet. It Coveted Half-Thousand- Hour Goal Reached At Today With the Flyers Reported in Good Health and Congratu 1 a t o r y Mes- sages Flashed to Endur- ance Refueling Reported Perfect. FLIGHT FACTS a. m. S. gallons. so that the chickens spent consider- m- Head of Famous Virginia Banking Family Was Native of-Danville FLORENCE. Italy July 2 John Kern millionaire of P is residence here spec offering for and thus far this year It has .jlven 611 Last jear the district 319 to the orphanage In while this year It has alrei ly S3 262 With yet three months until tilt ur the Viigima Annual j Conference In October it seems i clearly Indicated that the district will far surpass Its record of last In add tion to the above thcie were reported 386 additions to the churches of Ihe district on pro- fession of faith. Tlie conference was to order Jin n tii Tagc 3 Col. Mrs. Beatrice F. of Lincoln. Is a candidate against Senator George W Norrls In Nebraska's Republican to be held In August She is second woman In Nebraska to run for the United States Senate in a primary able time the seemingly feeble ray Without exception these ens developed In full health Dr Maughan said the small light even may have Irradiated the chicken feed with the precious ultra-violet More remarkable still was curing of chickens with rickets simply keeping them under one of these small of the special glass Sev- ere rickets was cured by holding the legs ir the perpendicular ravs of one of these lamps having a re- I7ector. the time required being only 20 minutes a day The big thing In says Dr. has scarcely The Been touched. That is Its possibilities for prevention of disease. Thus far It has The Been used mostly after Illness started. Go to toj Question Man Believed to Be Edward B. Saul ROCKY MOUNT. Va July 2 county officers are leav- ing today for Ashland. to ques- tion Jack a believed to be Edward D. wanted here in connection with a slaying 23 years ago. Ashland police telegraphed the sheriff's office here that a man an- swering Saul's description was In custody there on another' charge. Saul Is wanted for the slaying of Marshall King near here In officers stated. Commonwealth's Carter Lee said that old court records re- vealed that King's deaih resulted Irom r valry In a love tfffalr. The records set he that Saul wooded section lured King Into a near Rocky Mount In the back with a shotgun. Lee said nil save one. and In- cluding an are stl.i liv- ing. Saul has not The Been seen here since shortly otter the killing His mother lives near Harrlsonburg --------------o------------- NATIONAL HANK CALL WASHINGTON. July comptroller of the currency Issued a call todfty for the condition of all at the close of business Monday. June 30. Dance. Park Th'ursday 10 'til 2. jfc AT LOS ANGELES TO BE GRILLED IN LI Frahkie Foster Suspected of Being Gangster Who Supplied Gun to Slayer and Also Trailed Lingle to Subway Where Slay- ing Took Ar- rested Men Deny Any Knowledge of Slaying of Tribute LOS July Chicago racketeers were In Jail here today pending extradition proceed- ings against their Frankle wanted In connection with the slaying of Alfred newspaper reporter. alleged for the Bugs Moran gang- was said by Chicago police to have supplied the gun to Llnglc's two of the arrested George Davis and Frnnkie were declared to be gangsters associated with Foster. John Chicago who participated in the arrests here. Indicated Foster would bs the only one extradited Poster announced he would fight extradition nnd said he had an clad Foster inslited the pistol used to kill Lingle and subsequently traced to him was token Irom him by Chi- police more than a year ago i no longer worth living. and never returned. Foster also as- serted arrived here lew oeiore the Lingle killing.. Marvin Aplei ana Herman the otheri piebumably came heie witii Josser ihe said Foster planned 10 enter the The Beer racket on large scale. Walters described hlm- as ail industrial engineer. know you are he told you have got nothing on me. Chicago don t want me. 1 here to install and operate brewing machinery xor Mis. Fiank wife of the lead- was booked loi but police said she was not wanted In Chicago. Chicago police de- tective who aided In the roundup said. know Foster gave the gun to Llngle's nnd he Is known to have The Been In the srubway ten min- utes before the reporter was shot. He took care of the guns lor Burga Mo- SHOOTS SHU' ------0------ PARIS. July 2 Francis H. aged of died at the Hotel Dleu hospital today of self-Inflicted gun- shot wounos. He wa.s attached to the battleship squadron that has The Been visiting Chcrbouig on the mld- shipmcns summei practice cruise. He leii a letter saying he found Hie Aerial Photographers Are Nearly Through But Much Remains for Ground Forces The survey of the Dan and Roa- noke rivers by the U S war depart- ment. Is progressing ac- cording to G H. Matthes. district engineer for the U S war depart- of who Is here today on an Inspection of the work done so far. Mr. Matthes stated that the aerial photographers are 85 per through with their there re- maining only a few scattering gaps which must be filled In. Storm clouds the past several days have held up the aviators Ground foit.es have already started work and much remains to be done by them. Slace al- though considered valuable in this frequently show distortions which prevent a thoroughly accurate scale being arrived what Is known as control survey work must be done. The approximate scale Is determined by the pictures but the task under- taken Is so delicate and accuracy Is so essential In every detail that the work must ba nothing short of per- fect. In this control survey aerlla photographs of sections plotted will be used while Intricate calculations The death was caused by bronchi- tis Branch was 75 years old. His Beulah Gould and a were at cl-eath- bed His sou and a married daugh- Mrs Zeyde B and a brother and sister were to arrive today. Branch lived In Florence for twen- ty yeais In a beautiful villa which he owned k and lor its antiquities and works ol art Is one of che most noted In the American colony. it born in Va. RICHMOND. Va.. July John Kerr of R who died last night in Florence was one of the wealthiest men Virginia for many and v prominently identified with business And c vie enterprises or tne state He was head of Thomas and local brokerage house. I member of the New York Stock ex- i change and president of the Mer- I chants National bank which later consolidated with the First National. Mr. Branch was born May 1865 In Va. His family move-i to Richmond when he was eight years of age He received h s early education Richmond and later studied In Paris and Germany. He is survived by his who was Miss Beulah Frances of New a John Alken of and two Mrs E. A Reynolds and M ss Loulss bo'h of Richmond One brother. Blythe W of and two sisters. Miss of and Mr.s A.- thur of London. also survive Mr Branch maintained a residence at N Y. an estate over- looking the Hudson near New city. Mr. Branch's objects of t ore considered among the most notable ever collected by an Amer can. I In 1978 Mr. Branch became a. prominent figure In the counsels 'f the democratic party Virginia In the presidential campaign r-lseJ one of the largest party chests in the h story of the commonwealtn. --------------o-------------' Curtailment in Mill Production Is Helping Trade CHARLOTTE. N C.. July tailment of production by cotton mills Is bringing progress to the In- dustry in Its effort to reduce stocks on hand and thus to bring nbout slowly a more favorable economic situation relating to most branches of the according to Infor- mation from the regional office here 1_ f lyphoid is irned Of Garnett Pleased by Number of Persons Being Vacci- nated Against Malady The citj health officer. Dr. R. Garnett. today expressed gratifica- tion over the large number of per- sons who ate taking cognizance of typhoid fever danger and are being vaccinated against it. He stated that iiumfjous men and es- pe-ially thrse going off to camp and on fishing trips as well as brief week-end camping are being j Orie of Wagner's Meas- ures Goes to One to Conference and Third Waiting House Action WASHINGTON. ator Wagner's biPs for the preven- tion of unemployment parted com- pany t today for the first time In their legislative one going to President another to con- ference and the third still awaiting action by the house Two of cijo measures were approv- ed by that branch of Congress late yesterday. The first contemplated the acceleration of public construc- tion In times of business depression and the other the creation of all that he has no- employment index to when ticed a maikecl tendency also on the part of older people to be vaccinat- ed against the malady So far this year there have The Been but two CFEGS of typhoid here. One was a case In the city which was very mild and some doubt has The Been entertained as to whether It was really typhcld The other case de- veloped at Schoolfield. the patient now being d-t Meirorlal hospital. Dr this admitted that he an uneasy feeling be- cause of fear of possible outbreak In view of ihe lack of sewerage faci- lities which still exists In several outlying sections of the city. It appears lack of city funds have The Been respoi slble for this work not progressing to a further point. Dr Ganiett stated that the typhoid canger is jibovc average and urges precaution In warding off the dis- that petitions are case It is leained already before the city council re- qupsting trur certain sewer work and Improvements be done and until this Is Dr Garnett feels that the danger of MI outbreak Is far from romote. building expansion Is needed. The foimcr was amended in com- mltteemltto' to eliminate provisions dealing with the advance planning of construction projects and the meaiure went to conference with the Senate for the adjustment of this and other differences The sec- ond bill wa.3 approved as passed by the Senate and now goes to the White House The of the advance planning paragraphs was the sub- ject of much of the debate which preceded the action of the house Representative republican and both criticized the committee and expressed the hope they would be restored to the bill in conference. Chairman Giaham of the Judiciary which had the bills in sale1 the paragraphs in ques- tion were unnecessaiy as public building p-ejects are always planned far In advance. The Wagrer measure on which ac- tion was aelerrcd would create a nation-wide system of employment exchange agencies with the finan- cial aid of the government ednebdav. Hours In Oil g CHICAGO. July sp. Hunier brothel's Irj Sparta today at t thermopylae of tne slmes. Rebelling the wild of time .111J mechanical fallibilities like and his three hundred o. K.C..- neth and John liunter at 11.40 a. S. T zoomed zestfully their 500th hour aloft Ths engine purred an Indignant retort to leports that the flight oi i-he of wouid end snortlj. a conference of Albert and Walter Cunter. the crew of the refueling ship with others interested in the ill'iit dis- -losecl that three cylinders of pfane's motor which had -lot The Been getting oil lor- three ..dd ocen fitted with new pipei anj now worKing KelilL-lliitf Uonil The refueling stup also pro- nounced m good but as a pre- _autionary measure the orothers of the ground said a neu piane had The Been ordeied in. leaaincc. .iiom the Stlnison in case Big ohould go Among the sages yesterdav viaa one froai Col Clurles 4 who 'i the when ne n'i3 and an air mail barnstormed times with the r The mark of 500 held no satisfaction lor the now that they have by scores ot houis the ri'corcl of Dale Jackson and set at 420 hours plus in Uie Sr Louli 1 onrtli The Spartans 'mve repMtedly clared they wojld ue aloft uutu the Fouith 01 Julj east. In view of the .20 daya' wear on trie the ground crew s.ud '.he- City of Chicago would to Sky Harbor so th.it A land- ing on the field auld he nude m the event of ino'.or For the record to OK recognised Ly the National Aen.idiitiCri.1 the landing -iiust be ma.ic fiom Uie talce-ofi field The bull markpt has swept over Shy Haibor Dinner in the only avail- able restaui ant nearby has. The Been hoisted from 75 cents to SI fashionable Russian the Petrushka club's root garden at tb.p plajs to constant night the purvejors of hot dugs Turn to Page -o- Col. are Bureau of Foreign ami Domes- r I rrtrtTnn by the ground crews On next A. L. Saunders of the government force will go out with a transit party. They will first work west of Altuvtstu foi a distance k.llcen miles along the Staunton .L and will later piocecd over oth- er sections of the territory. The local force will be increased In the next week or ten days when level parties will arrive from Rich- alter having completed their work along that stream. These pnrllcj will determine elevations and place bench markers by which meas- urements will be made and contours plotted. They arc expected to come to Danville next week. tic Commerce The cxirtailmcnt In the Carolina continues to about the same extent as for the past four months. Exports of mercerized from mills In this largely to South American Is con- tinuing in good but thcie Is substantial reduction as compared with exports for former years There Is also a fair business in card- ed yarns. TO I'KEACIl TONIGHT Elder of Chattanooga. Tcnn and Elder of wlH preach at the Primitive Bap 1st church on Clalborne sticet tonight at 8 o'clock. POSSESSION OF LIQUOR ARGUED NOT UNLAWFUL BEFORE COMMISSIONER Ruling of Supreme Court Cited by Frederick R. Coudert Who Declares That Intention to Sell Must Be Proven Before Conviction Can Be Se- cured in Case of Ray- mond Ar- rested in New York. NEW July con- tcnllon that possession of liquor in itself Is not -jnlawful W-AS argued before a United Stfttes commissioner here on behalf a patron arrested in a night club Frederic R. promi- nent appearing for Ray- mond who was arrested In n prohibition raid on the Holly- wood restaurant last pointed out that tile United States supreme court recently held that the pur- ift chase of Intoxicating liquor Is not unlawful and contended that possession without the Intention to manufacture or transport 'could therefore not be unlawful tell a man that he may law- fully purchase but that having obtained the possession of It he Is committing a crime by such he to turn tho la winto one of those ridiculous which would have The Been so admirably exploited by Gilbert wiU Sullivan and to which Will Rogers makes such pertinent allusions It were true that the possession or liquor t dence that It in the Exact Status of Bolivian General's Citizenship Unknown at Berlin July official attitude of the foreign office towaict General Hans Kundt today had not The Been defined tilth rmy degree of finality. Kundt. German ccmnun- der-in-chlef of the Bolivian participating In last levolu- 15 understood jv.-re row tp bf a Bolivian iLa. P.vs s- patches have said General Kuncit was a naturalized Bolr.l.in A foreign olfice spolcesuun point- ed out today that it a. and delicate matter for the luithori- tles here to Judge the nature of ai- falrs taking place muea The official position here v.is thit the German minister at La Pr.z was better able to Judge to wliit extent he was Justified in granting General Kundt refuge In the manufacture or were then Volstead act has transcended limits of tutlon and Is tanto xincoiviU- vV Commissioner p'Nelll rvUtd that other authorities posses- sion of liquor to dence of intent 'flr ptKniv tide evi- to and held Ackerman in Hall Mr trial. Hal A Coudert said he prepared to carry his argument tho United '-is court If nc.cesaary. Have. The Bee Follow wherever you go 15c A WEEK 50c MONTH 'It's Just like n letter from Telephone 21   

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