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Charlottesville Union Christian Intelligencer Newspaper Archive: October 11, 1858 - Page 1

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   Charlottesville Union Christian Intelligencer (Newspaper) - October 11, 1858, Charlottesville, Virginia                                 TlUZ XHUIA:. Tiii- \Vli01.K J3IB1.K, ANI> NOTHlNa BUT THK BIBIÆ  YOT.I ME  *>0  ir^ U ,  TilE INTELLIGENGEÚ  Ts cq>ii>vvn:i> by ■  33-  tioni”' ‘‘lio ‘‘áoil vvúrks  (' ! Î AIILOTTESVILLE, y A.. 0CT0BE1Ï11, 1S58.  -sf i  MÍN.~Ál>riWE.^  Asn  2?í.. Xj- OoXoitaoL^ri-  • . o. S.    i l’ia;vTi;u8.  n  L i  I  •M  i :  ' lite Voiui»»«** ■ }>‘ip'r*ii‘^<^à.,n>nud ùniii -ili arrcàiafff.» tii‘^ptiiH »¡i. ■' A‘ìi>>'r.li»i'vi<-ht* àr  ' 'h>traiflfr,    ut i^\ p'ti r,qu’tre {12    f<'r  «•/ii ff- ms-T<iO«4—(^mits/or rviry mLitqufnt, tur,r-‘^ù,n pfr tqiftirx,    '  ^ i,)j:vi{.’ics batax. ;  ■ ' AVc tire tauglit tii liOtv^ i«?st any imi) KlHiil Vi.u,    ¡Ulti vai» accunt,  . ttl’tvr tlio ti'iurition. of unni, aftor the riuli-- uientfl ofthR woHa,ìit\.l liot aanr Olinst/'-Ono of Safiatv’s itic-itl cinining devicc.s is to involve Olubtiun.s ili u vain unii ufsoioss Tun-trovcMy abotil f<oniet!nnii ('nliviily }<p<'Culativo.  i Ile caros nk wUiit we beiiovo and jn-actlco,  so wc do ,uòt beUfVo nini praoCuia Uie truth. Ali-are t'iihcr fur (’'hnst or airainst him. Wfl Ljiiuy, thoroiovtì, pnl <\bwn ti\! UoviiSÌra' ivs ‘dovici of Satnm The constant tlijomeot^ the api>^tl*'S wtiS ‘^llwist cvucvUeJ.'’ <|{' this they prcachoil, thoy ^ wrote, they tiilkiil. They : constantly hcpt' thb Diviru! personage bcibre I aici woiia, as onr Ldrii, our. Hc.loonicr, Savi-Lour; the Son of (jod. He AVA^ thiiretbro rc-fiartleti l»y thb fir.st OhnHfiim.i' »'< ' thu Alpha  »mlOuu'pi, t1icbegiiiiniiijr-;aiul the" cuding,  tho first aiul lhe ln«t/ flu! ' Mó^iutor ■ot iha  New ('u\en!irtf, and as rjilch a ftuitablc objocl for tho ¡llíolli.^vnt worship of im'n and angels. lie is thfe feinitrii ..i‘ dhvistiiuniy aA tlvo. S\in is tho fi-ntn! of the ^«luv syistom.i *l«is  ‘‘ the, devila b(>licYc. :iad;tre Tibhi but fuitli can't fiave theniL : Tho^ spirit«jr opimltion ^ reitrus iu the inloriuil worlil. To distract the attention of waiik^nd from tie Son ol llitiht-oon.snt'«.«—-thii< great oiinter oi (ho inohil iiiii-■ verse ■is'SA't^A’s’    Any 'Kysfom  undor the sun,;or'any th(!0):yj that will liavo a tcndonoy io caxiso OhvlstituiK to thiiik.i \e>>.s. and; conscquontly, to talk less ot Chri.st, the Lovd', is a pnltaldeoDC.lor the u:iv of tho Ad-verHary. ' .    j '  This idea \uuy Ive fui tlicr^ dévolopcd 1)V a 'few csaniplcs of the manifcr in which Ohrisr tiaiis havo bfTii iurirod from the faith ‘'beguiled.” -  ' : 1. datati wpÌi Tiii'cvv Ùiat to hnvcjapproadi-  cd Christiana with the open deelariition Hiat Jesus Wiis uu iaipoiitor, would have thrown them u])on Uiciv guard, when aiéy, cou\d ea-Bily.have repelled him. 'D.cy Ìool:ed ^upon tlcsus iis the Sou of Cl od, and over had the sword of the .«pint ready to    mightily  agaiuf^t him wV denied it, Put(iug on Uio ' ¿holic^ eflVoutmhclxwd mauifc^^  temptatvotx of the Sixviotu'} he admitted that Christ 4as thO 'Sou of Ood, as expressed in the scriptures j but started the idt!ji that hu- ' man languugc \yas too tame, tliat it inad-C({uate tc>; cxprci^H the full relation. .I he unlon^ or the unity of tho god-head, he iirgued, wa.s a great niystery.*111011 hi.s usual want of con-,8ist«ncy began I to improye the? 1a.ngnhge of tlie, spirit. ‘• There is a trinity;in unity, and an lunily in trijiityi” -‘ The I'athc-r is God, tbisoà isOod, the Holy Ghost is God,’^d yet there be not ihioe God.ì but one God. — Hav|.ug found a repvoscntutivo into wliose mouth ho eauld put, this . language, he .soon  found one for the oppo'iition, and thus set on  foot an endliiiis eontrover.'^y. Now the gospel !?as a plain revelation of iaeis, coniuiands and proniisiGS. To thx>.se, therefore, wliowcre not contented with the sinipje revelation^this stibiiinated philosoi>hy, “tlie ; doctrine oi tho Tinnitv,” alfurded a'sweet mor.-el. ' In this ’way it ioijuired but a short tiiiip to introduce a neAV style i>r speaking—a peculiar phraseology, so that each p;u-t|' has ever since had its Shibboleth, and if iliy one happened to s.jueuk out Sliibboleth,iie was iiumediately .vanciified to the gnat department. The iinal result was a divi.sion\vhieh could „not be  healed even liy the fleereis o!- Const:iutine.s (.Keuiuenlcal Couneif—a ^tIvi^)un kept up till the present, ihur. ,    . .  2. À inidher device was to lead the C hurch,  A very gnutually. to ado].t alinosi endless eere-moiiies, ubtil .'^uniC became: aiainiod, ami. flying from one e.Mrcme, lii upon the oiber. It ■was!c<;>ncluded tliut'we uve justilicd by laitU only. That this is a “vaiuand deoeitful phi-luiophy,'’ may be easily domonstnUed by any onC'who Will take pains to ¡nit.'cc the ments for its support. The niee, hair-spUttaig distinctions called into use, )>elong ^lot to Christianity, bui to (he emissaries of him who W’>nld darken cvi!ni>>.'i by word^ H’ithont knowleidgev “ All the w,.il:., ti..u: ^r«:• ean do,” says ibis pbilo.-opher, ‘’arc so piiHgUilieant that thpj' could Itave uui^aìt iu qur juiitificu-  Jli.it iearoth (■• d,” ^ay!; tin- spiri', fi£ht!’itui;iì,e;:>, is aeee]»t<-d with iiiiM." “'i'iiiii!. 've :n\' isv.iiíí.',! bv i'ai'ib unlv,'’  I    S    ■ • ;    . * ■  ; savfi' jihilosi>[diy, “ a mcït! ulMiîc.oiiié ^ doli!riue, und very ndl of e^'iaiui'!.” " ^e I see«fhell,” i.;rvs lIhí ss.irit,‘-iiuw ¡hat bv wdìks a ninii i.-' jusiilied, fe,ul noi: |f^,' i;ui,h eritly.’'-^— l’yio^o|diy li:K e;;(:vb!ishi'd a prineiide eoiitn:-dbiiiig'the iJ^ble, iïiiil an^ther.••dovie'i;’’ }jas suiK'e-.'\led.    •  S''  *' (), yes,'' snys flu' advei-s;try,i«  _    , Jle ilied' n:ir 8Ín!i>‘rrJ--'-,íb;- al! .^in-  1,1(1 lie, begins today ¡itcrili.-jr sUcss (Ui: the, wold U.11. i iie-then in.siiiiii<-s pliiu^--feO[ hie,arguments‘on the attributes oi' ( iod. ‘‘God is infniite in nierey and goodnesa. Jnfin-ite goudi/e.‘'S <-<(nld ik'! ¡¡tiid.*:!! a íinui ibievcr; therefore, all will be isaved." “Isn't this vain and dcAi'itful ]diikiso]iby '! Om H\ii':^ is cer tain ; it is not líible in langn ige or si'nti- -ment. The Hibie .*-ays : ‘•With lies ye have made the heart of the righteous sad, wliom 1 have uot made s^d ; and strengthened- the hand of the wiekjeti tlnu he .‘}.<ndd r.ot rc-iurñ J'rtm Ins wi(|ke(l >vay,,!>y. promisirig bini life." l'ïiilosophy bere eont rad lets the liibÌe; some beiievo the philosophy; therei'oi'o Satan's device ha-i bieeu s,iuceessful. ^  4. Siilan souiejiiines appr.iinches a young di.seiplt‘, adjiiiis t,li|0‘(‘0rreetne.':s of his laith ; ^‘but,” says lie, “it is not that old, strait-jaek-ct system generálly plead for. It adinits of all; rutional amiisements.’' fThrrc is,' iier-haps, an apjioiìiimeiit íor a social party, j lie. thou takes up .daiieing, or it may be ,the ungodly priictice i known iu tho -country a'i ■ “ playti,’' and with a profound diserimvuatloii absíraíífy them from nil aluise aiuUiéUîH them v.p as very liitiqnal atnuscmants. ,.Now. chri.stian, can you fiplay,'' or’Hlanjae,” in the uiuno of tho    Coi-taiúíy no!-. 'Then  , fclio fliin.sy’, .<?piilerweb pliiloaophy that uphold.s ' you, is “deóoltful|‘’ _ ; It î's one of ■^atan’.s de-viees'to lead :ç,lu'Jstiansi I'roin the service of-, , -I’hat it i-j riirht to e.dl those /thinus devi--CPS ,of Sat,-in appears from facts—Satan tempted Christ. lío presented motive and ' used\^opbi8tical rensttnitig, to induce, If possible, a departure fruin reolitudc. .i?ut the Lord Huceessfiiny resisted him, and di'ove him off. He is our divine c.\aniple. We, learn from him that to be proof against "every wind of doctrine,” we mu.st^become familiar with the use of tlie Sword of tlie S::>int which Is the Word of (,!od.  : . , J. Fuankli>’. ,  ACTION OP BJ     aware tbar.    ! ”f i ■      îi:sî. Isr'.'ihri    ‘.J 1      :>,f. '.v.’ii    ..V.'      weep ur    'i      . a.s a poller;          , se.s. i    t,*-, I'ii.Ti. .      iiisiariCi.’H.          Ì a)rwar.j Í-.    1.' f :      ^Wilt,    tio-n ;      a ml .wonu'i    I!- rniW,      \y ciiivei.;;    0-.Ì Vl!i;      eor>l.ÍF!¿ til    her bl      ])o.sed sÎm'    UmI :'o:l      ' sat on hr    r ea-.:      1 till' j)0‘ir, i    lai.’it-iK-;     \ , !\V.. Av.'!:' ¡"SÒS,  I.'\ 'i; : on ;\re doubtless ■i ii iicf ti-Hiugo!' our Biip-;-'.-'!SÌM!).,'d    oeenrri'n-  vs nut \vl:e.lbe,r to it. wuuid \)V. v;cll, ',!< I'ling!.:! the twu e.Korei-  Wiadom is definc;d by \Vcbster/‘Thc right use pr exercise of linowledgo; the choice of hiuda bio.ends, and of tJie |jc.st moans to accomplish them.” /  Now, we arc informed in the New Testament, that freqiieutly whoa lîaptism was' to be iidiiiinistered,.both administrator and can-did;ite.s i&r baptism, vesorted ■ to 'pliU'i^'i ' of “much water," and,that ‘^thcy went down into the Viater.” ^Ve a.sk, thorelbre, was this the best means of Hprinkling or pouring the watev on the penplo !' If not, and AYcbster’s dttfuiition; of ivisdnni be correct, the going tn(0) or even /<> the .water, to sprinkle or ]iour, W’as i'oolishuo.is ; a    or a ¿asm would  have-been fai* be iter ineims because far more convenient. '    I ~  ,Tlïe -I’resbyteriaus si.d'loui t.ir never resort to places of’ïiiueb water. Iu this tliey are w:ise,iif sprinkling and pouring arc bapiism. ]>nl, if they are wise, Jedp (.’hri.st, and tens of thousands of nihers whjf resoried to places of much water were unwise. The reader mrij' taki- w iiieb burn he pleases.  OinOIethodist frien<îs sometimes ;ift jiro-Vokingl}’ abmu this matter. Wle. n we argue with them tli.it Jîâptism, in priieitive iiiues, mu.-,t have bei-n immer.-ion, because ii. w;'..-, administered at p!ace> of much water. “O,” say they,'We al.-o gfi to ]ilaeescif luiich water and .liflt'r all du le.itbiiig more than ^])i)ur or spriiiWe.” And why <lo they du itl>e-cause they are in a straight [jî.ice—they wish to m;lke a -bie.v of, eoiil'uriuity to jtrimitiVe usage, and at the sanie time practice their own tradvtiou-. lUit, according to \Vebsti>r,_ it is m;:Mif<.;st ioily .' It is. a,' if, i-ustee.d' of lighting my euielb; at my own iireside. or with my own matebes, 1 should go every evening, or send my scr\ant, to light It at a! furnace, at the disiapee of a mile, or, perhaps;, .several,miles from my residence. Theipco-ple would say " /i<: is rf(i~i/ But the children of this world !ire,wi.-ci: in their ge-:iera-tion than the children of light.  <,!i;kry.—If |T uui.st sprinkle or j.iiur, »n what part of the l-.ody sbouhl ihe watCT lie sprinkled or poiivi'd.';:' A word' of ¡lie Lord on this.r^üi'Meij'f. v.'onld be vei'v aecu;)!-able!'    - ' ’  i    A: Kaines.  : lie is the inuther of men h;¡d long beou'deep-‘  L.ici'-ly, and .strtving, noia, ^¡¡iVer re-'t. Blu- siip-  .!ii! ii, liur the cuiirf. thai \v:ss rigidly ortliodox, ¡ind irU-d girl answered sonic (jues!it.n o\U ui' baraiony witli the strict letter of' old ,i.f.liioned, ijciun'iic Calvinisni. She was rej-eii-d, Went honie in deep dejec-jeeiioH, and, for a nuiiiber of ^days, refused to eat or be ccm-'orted, She remains out of the oluiridi to ibi;.; d,;ty. Tliis ease be1(.),ng.s , to Uie Iragii' d.  . Durint;- a    revival in a . Kentucky  ehureh, a go.j.i many years ago^ when long experieiices v,ere in fashion, a candidate was telling what the Lord bad done for his soul." 'J'he stories of doubts aud fears and .si'rr.ggleb of tlie- tiine.s, v,'cre very much all aiiko ; and at the meeting now referred to, tho eandidatfjs fnr baj.illsin had learned lo sav, ‘'the iiiore they prayed tlie worse they got.’' The po.ir, .Si.ibbing sinner of xvhom .1, iiui speakiag, mi.'^si'd the exact 'point of “ Ovtuodu.'vy,” and, snppo.sing that a.s prayer is a good thing it ought to have a good efi'eet, said that the mori; !n. prayed the in.itcr he got.” ' ft would’nl.do ; the blunder was fatal, aud lie was advised to .“ v.-ait awhiie." WJiethfu- he ever tried pr^iying ;v: a means ofgetting wov. e/’ I am not informed.' Those, sir, are fr.ei.s.  There is a eirenm'í:'tanco which Dr. Campbell seems to have ovcrloekcd,.while making his .swei.'ping and slightly’arroga.nf deehira-tions concerning pur jgnqrance of Baptist experience, and our total iuabilit}- to understand ii- That jcircuin.stance i.i this : Some hundu-d ofour brethreii in this State wore once Tbipiists, fold a 'Baptist experience,and were received for Ijaptism by Baptist ehurch-es. 'I’hey certainly know sonicthiug about it. Again, nearly all ■. our first preachers, a good many of wbe.T.n still survive,, were Biip-'ti.’t prea(dievs. l.)o tliCy know nothing about this wondovi'ul experience? If,D('. Campbell wi.nlies to know wh}^ all these tìow place less value.upon frame, and feelings, dotibts and fears, than firmerly, I beg to refer iiim to E!d5r John ‘ SUiith. of Georgetown, Ky., who,'I doubt n<i!. v^ill n.iost r>-'.--pcctfnlly confer with him on tire Ki.ibjvct. 'flie Doctor . mcjst <.iert:rinly needs enli^litemnent. It is duje to truth    i-*r C-’s deüberateiy clur-  ^ sen pi^'-:iiion siionbl i,ic exposed; and, as “tho masses” apprei;. ¡r! an -igninent uiost renili• ,iy liy mcalls of sir,'.’dr:' ÌHìj^ììaiions, Í Khali oifer one Í íríí: IVieed Sh:dcer or a 3for-inan to. Jnsiiiy f:i i'ee ■>','orbi his ré]ÍL'-i"ons faiih and praciii:o. The, ohu abjuics nmlrimony, .ihe-other is ai ])o’y,;:a;e>isi; iha one denies the huiiortanee, ev.:n the ])roprietyi of water bajitism in every ftirni, the other practice.s' imntersion. 1 hey both (ell me (tlie)/hnv.e liiit.'iinJd vu:} that they have respectively experienced the bli.'-.-'iV,! ell'ccti-: ot their .systems — they have experieiiced a great change, of wbieb 1 am irinorant, and wdiieh they can Dot'explaia to me. ( rfoe ÌJr. ('ampl.^ell’s leitcr to the li.irbinger. ) Mow would the .Jioetor relish tlris ,Soaker eir-Mormon logici" ùs'oii', I lìti ì)i/ lio ■ii;r<niii ruDipurr our liirj)-Inu tlinii in Mdymrms nr    ; bull  dii eomjiare ibis iSluiker . ami >lurmon loj;ic with ()r. (':nnpbe!!'s, and fearlessly aifirin ihe es.-ential id(i:itity of the two. I’itiable is it lo see a ^íMitlcman' of acknowledged a-jjilily thus driven, by.it tradititm called ‘-Baptist usage,” fo perncirate ,‘^uch folly, Ur. C-'.s jjositioii is u'crely an ungraceful abandonment of this ti;iiditi'..)n of the good old Baptist fathers. At least, in justice todiim, ,I shall so re/ard it, for i)f. (]. L not onlv a  ...    V  Jv.'irned" but a sci).';ibie imin.  It is niy pur]v.-.,so to e.vandne carefully tho ftlhAvioe nr;)pi.isii,iori : •‘\"uU f Kefornier!'] re-probu;-' win- I iJapli;-!] e.'-poi ienee of a gracious ;ui.i    ; c,iiati._-i.‘.’' ^eveni! v.'ord-, ill this jirotioii, iiM reooire e.\aet deiinilioii ; and, iirst, i-]l,y:uoloi:y an^l Ifxi-■enii.-.; will not ail.! U' lu-re ; fir wc lio not in-rjuirefor the or^lio.-wy, curi'ent meaijinir of ihe word, bill foi' i!s..-'^jii'.-!ai technical or tlic-ob'^i^a; ;-i.;ii!;;ic,iii.in. It ¡ivaii-:, tbeo a euii-seiou>ur.''. ehanLr"S winch the mind, il ' ’, !oi' nii/i’al .scotinicoi,-', i!ic  This is all himplo cons,-¡oiiHtie¿s of stairs of the ndnds nml jiireciions. Thus <me may be conscious that he believe.^ i]u! -ospe!, tliai hr is f^oviy ff.r;,Ms sins, that he loves .the, Saviour, that im dr«ids and desires to . escape- ihe wrath toco:ne, that.he wi.s!ies to live a huly  lifc, that he hopes fer cteriia! life, lie rc-mouibersld.s former of udnd lomd.iuLr those things, aiid clearly apprehends that a great chauge, ha.s taken place within him.— llo /-w/ir^hat^ his viewa and feelings,, hii! mind"' and .heart, liis •^i'lshes and’ purpo.^es, have been changed—that, his viow.s ut bin and ftiufubiess have been cfuingod that his conseionee has been rjiiic'c-eñed. It* would be e.'ceeedingly .‘■lÜyj ]iow-evcr, in any one to .suppose that the.se change;; and coutrasts will be apprehended with tho same force and olearness, and noted with oi^ual di.stii^ct«os.s, by alJ,mjndá,. With ma-tiy, perhaps with u vust majority dfigenuine ponverts to Jcsu.s, the eonsciousiics.s will be found to be indistinct, confused, chaotic.— The ¡ridividual .seeking a homo and eternal iost for his soul in the bosom of the all embracing love, can say this only ; “Tdesire to own the Savior, to embrace the promisoi., and to struggle for life everla;iting.” And this is enough,.foi' j¿ w wrUlcn, “If thou be-lievest \vith all thy heart, tliou mayest.”— But we have now to inquire what all this experience is worth, ¿H itself ,;msi<h:rcd? l' say nothing, absolutely nothing, as evidence of regerieratiou. . , ,Of itself it proves nothing, either to the .subject of it or lo tho.ic to whom be reJatps it, cxcept the fact, that the changes specified have taken place. In order that the states of mind pf which any pnb mny^ declare bimself consciou.s,, or to have been consciou.s, may be adduced as Jeaid-matebvidencoof conver.slon, it mmthe shown that ilu'A': of mind arc. rrquircd hy iIil antftdrih/ o/Jmis; otbcrwise, every enthusiast, everv iliiuitlc, in order to make good his eliiim to rpspcct, and. thQ. clann of.-.bj,'» '‘System” to: ac.ceptance,. has’ only .to , detail his “expcrlcuce,of a. graoious and saying change," ,A^^atqvor is.pro^^ upon con-ditiofr Oi'.spop¡}jí>iof^^cin||cá in .the mind and heart being eil'ected, in:iy bc olaimed, but no-, thing mofCv . The que,stionr then is, with u.?, ^what say tho Soripturea-? Wiiat do,they ro-qUire us t(;,f<3eJ and to do id; ,order to salvation, pre.se'/it |ind efcorJi,-d ^ According to Dr. Cam poll’s Ijogie, we are. in a s.'id ca.sojifor we cannot get his-^xperience till we bolievo hisisystem, Ilow^s one then get a start T’ Are you not glad, my brother, are you not devoutly thankful to “the Father,” that we have taken- the holy Seript.ure,s,, for our guide, which cut able to make us „wise unto snlvation'/ When I rcllect upon the shocking ignoruuee of God's W'urd that prevails hi many Baptist communities, and in,spcct the proceedings at« •‘revival,” the way iu wliich what Dr, C. calls the “Baptist system’: is preached ancl applied, I ■wundci-; not that some, tbiife,many, have their religious instincts faiiiiod into wiide^t couinuitioii and fnrned top.syturvy, so thai;; repentanee h tboui;hL to coiiie before faith, and tho faith-le,ss penitent to become the worse fyr praying. Almost iiuy^ extravagant resuU luigJit be iairly anti^-ipaied from such axtravagant means. j v .. ., It is uot wcll,lthlnk, that our Baptist Brethren should assuiiie that thejaro any wiser any bettor than we. are. 1$ all .the.so re.s-peeti none of iw have whereof to boast before God or iu prosenee of one another. Ifave they,a consciousness of peironai and a persuasion of donominatioual short-comings and uav;ortiiinc.s,s r So have we. Do they believe in Cod and in hi,^ son Jesus Christ?_  So do we. Do they deplore their v.l¡.yiou^ indiJfert-JJcc? S(v.^ do we, ■ ,Du tiiey desire Christian unioa iu truth and on the Truth ? So do we. Besides, wc-bave a great Viiri.cty 0Í éxjicriences- not Baptist experieneos, it may be. Dut Bapti.it e.'iperieuce should not be expecti-‘d oí us, seeiio.^- we are not Bapii:.:t,4, but may WG not have somelhin- quite as good?^ Wehave/^r inst.-mce, the experi-: encc of the carch.',--s sinner—the e.xpeiienec' of the lukewarm proi\-„sor—tho cxperieaee of the wmldly-minded professor, etc, i’or-hap.s a goo.I many B;i¡itís!,s could be fdiuid this very day, with sooic of i,';e l.'jist dc.vii'a-ble of these cxp.'i ieuei-s. Jiui, this f do not MiliriiK This pii[,)er, much, too long, luu.st here close,    IJver yuuns,  ^    ' Ji. L. ]^i,VK7:/rro.v,  WÍÍKHH Til!<: BIBMO C,ViíííII<:.S J'iiU-1 •[,]■: WI!i) i'0!d,()V\’ IT.S ■Ti-:.\c'iJiX(;,<.  w iu lhy Bro. Johusoii'ss A uuin aud hk wife moved Into the noigliborhood from Ijllnqis, wlu’n; tliey had bceu Mothodl'sts.' ConiUig in contact with pomo of onr.zealou.s brethrfiJV, they set them lo inYO.‘^tigatirig the Bible, which caused tlicm tci stnhd aloof fi'oiri, tho Metlunlist (.Kiurch. TikvMctli^i8t|«onchor' on the circuit, hearing that they .had been members, went to see thehi,.to ascertaiti the reason that they did not joia tho clirirclt,~' They told Iiiui tliey had coiieluded to invis-' ligate the Diiilii well lioforb they any church, and to go wherever that cafricd -them. . “Well,” replied tlic ‘ preaeirer.’ '‘‘tf' you follow that book, it will carry you to ^ Cai)ii>hrHiirs' at Jdhy».son’s.’\ ’ And b'hj’o' ‘ enoug|j^ it did carry tlicni to the people so niekmiined, who met ili'erei Conilnoiit ta ' u n necessary. , It'was an ackQOwl'eflguient 'thnV * wc arc rl(/h^ fo'x the Biblb cati^^lb'atl'pdrtple astray, when rightly uiideKstobtl and follo^cfl, but is an uiiehitig gutde to ,thc tVud liiitl' right way. ’ ’ ’ ' ' ‘ . ' ' '  Anotlier siniiltu’ case, and a good ono: Bro. Daw.son, beli% at work one diiy wUH nMeth* odi.st, the coDversatioil soon turned’ on the'-' subject of re igipn, jJro. D.’s faS'onto thelii'e,'^'^ when the Methodist brother relaicd ‘tliq ' fol; lowing ci’ cumstance to him. Sonic ipeiiiWi^ of the.;i>I, K. Church, aniong wliBiri was,'this ^ one aud their preacher, had a nieetiifg" one i day, to devise some nieaua to kcep'ttieirjclii!-dreii from going over to the ‘‘ Cimj>lcIUtcs?’ One fSald tliat the bcfct plan would ho id keep them froin going to lie.iu' thciui’and prejudice them as mucli as pos.slble against tltem.-— Anollfcr said that.tho'advice, was very godil, and lie tlioughf they ought- to „ have tHeiu taught the Discipliue, aud kofcji tlidui 'fToriiH hearing our preachers as much as pq^aible. It now oanic tfd the tjiini' of tKis .MethdSlsi b.i other, w’lio was at"wi)'rk ■vvi'tli Bro.' I).,‘ td', -give, hi'-i adviii'e, '“'VV'ell,'" saia"li6 to ’theVii','' •brotjliren, TIiitend' to' givo ’cinldren '^all *  ceddcd to the cijroniition. Borrowing his idoà^' from scenes familiar to his audience, hç at l&t mar^httllod the iininoh.so ptoccflïiôn ‘ ■ iliwving' towrirdiKe;gfi^^    to jiîiicV li»e  iuHi^nia of royalty upon thé heacVof thc ïCitig ‘éï'iUé'tJniverse. ,  So vividly did the preacher dpsoribe the èceùo,Hhat yo^ uotuaîiy thought you 'wero  iynvînnf'iïnAri    l/\r».» î!*«.rv    .1.- -.«.^1  • kingò^‘propilei and apostle«, ^rtyra and coniesàóra of oyory age and clime j at length tlio gi^at tonipio Nyas fi|l4d^.and tlie , soieian , an^ iin^iQsing oeremonyr, of crooning., àtiout.iò take place. The audience by thia t^iiio wijro brou^h t ^ t|i0i |iighest jpitpb pf e-’c. ’citenient, it«i^:h|l9 mgmontavfl^^ exp|£^cting ,to hear the]^|iijtÌ)iojflput/ronil    aa* .  'pemb'iage, tbe-prieiV?he.i;:,CQtu»ncnced , tiiugV;..  i.“'-'!--.-- i    , I "  I,,    the power of Jesus’ uame^ •  ; iLetiangolfl prostrate    i :  - The effect.was. eleotrloal. The audienco started" to their fcet and sang the bymn ‘ sticli spirit and;fccling, aa, porliaps, it never WÙ8'Suiig bjeforè or since.    * .  ''RiglVt loyally did that gretit congregation ‘p^y hobiagb to ihe Saviour as the Sovereign ;  ' that lj|)rdVàj«y mòriiihg..    ì  THE JKW ANIi THE OHBJSTIAN.  ' rt pr-iirK-!"d no.  .s] .M’51 W.ii  rii»: I h‘i )»i‘,-\S' aa t iri U" t; - l!y I    il rt.- \ i Va  |»C l‘i-M: C't..'    (ij tliC    11 Cv'Il.-:::'ihtf  remtmbcicd cuuhciousucaa of these changes.  L".'IK i': iiy Jn-  it' 1 I ! .V, I •!' 11 till:- I'.'; -  Wliee in Mis.'ï ari, lu.-,( lounmi'r. v.'r ln :inl tlie t'l'llowiii'j eir, uiii.-iiiuee, ;,Hil .  Î Ilf' Ii. !i tlu- !;1 I : 1...! tl wlo r-' ii 'o]; f.  fow oretiir; !) a::i! r,-, ('ii M iiiie V\ al:-.' ('re-, k, ili 1‘irry or iiuliliiger Co., Wuie iri I the habit of meeting occusionnlly at a most  jthe .ctjucaiiijn f'cab,' fi’'T gij4’'tliéñr'uotíi'in^^  . else, ;uiid i.hen give thcura%YJit-’/7('l'tóm'cn^  ,,and [ell tbeii\ to go by . tliat, ^follow it" whercveu lb ló’ad,s them;*' ‘tltìfé the prsa'c^er * spoke, an;i ,sáiÜ, ■‘‘lifyoit dò tliilt they wtíí , every one hixnmc Camphrllitéi.^' ' '  These arè'réal’ ooeiirróiiciis, tbiit àòtùally hoppencd, as‘1 had them froin tho! beà't' àù-thority. They show very plainly that wbàt' ¡,•3 generally termed “ Cumpb(‘jUs)ìi,’' \s.ÌGA\, true,. ]iriiuitive Ohristlanit,y, and that'¡.Ife/toi fli$ni is ;¡o/, but consials of the ¿¡nvcntions Í aud traditidns' of liicn,<áfad:shoüld bo diáóáríl-, cd. It show.s, too, from the agency of their-^ pvf-urln'rs in tViese inattei«, that “the leaders, of this people cause them to err,’f  j; R. néWAÍii):-Xvar Pftdiico.il, X)/., Axi‘¿. 25| 185S,-  ' EXTILlOIlHMfy^^    :  The lato Mr. W. Dawson, bolter known ^s (ho l^ork.shirc Farnieiv was justly C(»lebrated^  - foi- his rciuiirkablp^pujpit eloquence, ’ferveut •])iety.and ú^itiying steal. Giitcd with a mosti fertile ima¡>‘riiatíc)ñ, he sometílucs cíotlied his idaaH v/iUi znast flowery ' arid poetical . guage. He pos§e.ssed^ too, in,,a,reniarkabl9 degree, the power ofturning to the greatest,, advantage any, eircumstaiKie oiiloulatejd.to.ifdd;, the greatest effect, to giv;e point to his ;dis?| C0UISC,'3.    ^    ^  A-rem.\vkable instauco .ofjbls power occurred when once preaching hi.s fainou8:f!er-mon from iier, vi,; 8 After de.seribing in mo,Ht graphic language the awful and.ipovil-.; ÒUH eoadition of tlu^ sinner exposed to the righteous judgments of ort'ondcd justice, lie' introduced the messenger of state, the rider of the pale hprse, Ilivcting^the attention of his tiudielice by a powerful aud vivid déscrlp-lion of death and its consequeneeis, he made a sudden pause iu hii, discourse. The most profound .^llenoe pervaded the church, so mucii that the tloklug of the clock iu tlie gillery could be distinctly hc'ird. Titking advautiigo of tho eircuurstauce, ho ioanc^d over the front of the pulpit, and sw'.aycd his hand to sand fro, like the poudulum of a ‘ clock. Then lifting his Unger in an attitudo • o!’ profijund attention, in a scarcely , amliblo wbisper, he said, “ flark ! h,Trk!! listen!!! Don’t you hj ir.the tram:» of the pale hor.se? Hearken to his «toady, ceasele.-iS approach !" Tiieo ('le.’atiag hi-i voioo tjj the highe.st pitch, h^' evelaimeJ, Lor.l, .-'avo the sinner, for d.Mill i.s upun him, and hell is close behind !"  Tby eif.-ct was ovcrwheiining. Strongmen .swooned away, and it was^ a co'n.sit|orable time ))cfore the preacher, could resuuio his dl-'C<iurse.    !  -\t aiioiiier time, when preaching in South Lainbeili ofi tlie ofllee.-i of Christ, after pre-seii'.iiij- b.itii a-the great Teasd.ier,-a:id IVie'st v.bo loadc himselflui o^ifcring tbr^ .sin, tho pr '.u'ber introduecd him as thei King of saints. After proving to a deluo«síration 1 that ho was King iu bin own vigbt, lio pro'  The Jews do not bdliove in the Now Tes-tauiet.t, or in JcSus Chri.stj sb that when onc of thoif ^    tj^y hkvo no right  to believe tbey arò - boppy wit1i?our blessed ■■ Savior. I ’    ■’ 'f'  * I otfee board a Jew, who bad been cbnvcf-tedHo tho Christian retigion, siiy be witnessed ; such agony oj piind in.oneof biß, unconverted brethren 'Wben bè lost ii.ileaTf oìi^Ìà, that '¡be 'could bii^diy, äesenbe it. ¡ He tore bis f’hairi'^e boat bis beaiÌ againa^t tbe w^ll p lio ‘^oiffld^iot bo consoled., "|j  SÖ0Ü after be.went to the iujuse of ¿notK'-i > er'Jew whd was a Christian. He. Knocked èt tncrdoor, and.there cair.e lo,onen it one of ,  'iifdy-ivlo opened tbo'* dòor"Wre,  'want to isefe sxiìt6fÌ^*^‘‘SbV toofebrnribtö oao  .•t'i, :    1 niff    ■  or 'tmo roonw,/w^er^ wfis ^coffin. Turnipg? dowti' its lid be sawi tbe Bister iu ber,shroud.  ' iHnnó'd upon hpn breast jwere these wotdsr-" **SliiJ*8le6ps in Jokis.’^-    ■- | -  ' I>eàr eblldretì,' wbat a difforence there Was ¡between tbo'poor^Jewisli fathijr who lost'his ■fcbiiiirarid ^ho .CTiri^iaa, faihcr. Can any of I yoäi toll whaii rndfleietbia . difference ? Tho rChristian “bb)i(jV^'hi»; J^Us àiìid loved hiui, as did bisdà'u|fiter. , ^'V’oiu blessing t|^^,i[jhri|^tiiin religlop is    this  - wòtld. How peaceful wa.'s the CbnstisiB father,'and'hoW desperate the other. Lov8> Jtfijiis, and'wlieb your parents die 'will notbé left àjpnci and when you die, you will be with him forever.  [Chrig. K .S. Jottrnul.  . :Tji|K Dk.U) in    iiie vlctoiry biis  ; beouigftiuod.l :Tho gravp. has beeu“ d'^robed ,,of.its.torrp.tft.    nqw. faith, the fnl-  ,gl«ioi4 uf tliH*li;«wise, H will swallow up ..deatl| in jvji'toiy, > Tbe:;deail, in Christ ;\Vbi[it a si^tnif we co^ld behold, them !*r—  J TbejtearH jwiped.nway by their Savior’shand, ,. z^w)ijieniug up After'.hiaIikon.ess, &ud.sati.'»,fled with It. 'Ifhelast look of suffering mortality is changed into ,ono , pf; perfect ; .pcapt. ,Tho  fall of the óoffiuTÌId, luakes no echo in our  1 ... 1 1.1.. ..... - « . < : • - . '  hearts now ; -;ded ceuieter' the. dead  I thp gr;^v9>,.whether.in thV crow-  orthq quiet ohureh-yard,,whw ie, foiitering |iu uudisting^iished  ‘ masses, or .^vhevj? ;tho spr^ug .an^ .^iuniuier; weave a garland with_grass and leaves, the grave has lost its victory; aud the thoughts arc chased away that wrapped it like a wiuter snow, or hung over it like tho shadows of i night. For tho great I'juster moroing has come after the Sabbath of tho grave, aud the soldiers of Christ arc luusturiug round tb Captain of their salvation.—XatiunalMtr/u-xinc.  WHAT IS nONOil?  “Mother, what is honor?" asked AYllllam, stopping .short in tho middle of :a spelliivg lesson, where this word occurrod. j  “it has several meuulugs, uiV son. Do you remember tho Fifth Commanlment?” William readily repealed—“Honor thy father and thy mother,” oto.  “■Well. here it moans to love and o-bey.”  joysat school say, ‘Up, What does a little  “But) mother, the on iiiy word aud Jhoic boy’s houor meau ?’'  ‘'What your 8choo|-fellow8 think of wbeu they say thus, I know not; but my Uttlc boy’s honor is;qbcdieHOcto his pai-onts, attaa, tion to his inustyuctors,, kindm-s."^ to hjs phu'>^ unites, atul diliguuvc in his studies.’'  “I think I uwdci-istand vhat honor Í» now, mother,” said WiUidtu, <ui bo resumed hi» leMoa.    . '   

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