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Broadway Virginia Echo: Friday, November 8, 1895 - Page 1

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   Broadway Virginia Echo (Newspaper) - November 8, 1895, Broadway, Virginia                                'V V.' burg. Blink Mt Islltnd 08, ohO'hnndRHl ond.  .' wKfrnmn^ yioMnitf^ with AjjWfgo of* '-^C^^'^-'-Cr*"^'**'^'^'    ll'^eMthprisdnmeHit. -iSjNfclWfeifilia^iiplsylng wnl'rinP6�rglSk*ft"^fi#,*ir., w�o kiloek*d downliif A' mhiiimjr .tMffi. EmmarrJiink�, . Mged throe yoliM/wnKliiUed, nnd �Svmr-yonr ��dly, Injnredi'^ Blmpi^n's''oott�n mill,^orAet�d klxty^ilTft yei�ni.��oiit'l!fonl�towny 1*., nnd oWnsd by Doim�*Mitoholl,>��Bwlfe, gave evidence damhglng to  :|�ls case.* It Irun^derstoodtha^^ Will offer no evidence,but submit theicase on aignment alone;T4^The � trial * of ; Robert CrbisfMierOiff eni mnth Yaar of Publleitlon. VOLUME 8. IIGOTED IN NONE- WM GRIM, ?tfl�a*      f�aWlih�r NUMBER 24. fta I At Its eomliii iu>W m iMa tejel^ ,' A rlnglBg eborus awetls I Wat once It Bpok'6 #11^ Llberty'sWa roles-''Thlsbellotbetlsl' lt*stdBgiieihM�hero�#1n iM '^*6t old, ; And iHII, as dear as then,    .. Its deathless story to thfl ages told   . Hakes patriots of men I And in its presence, sw^t from stated to strad^ Besound the bugle notes, ~T O'er its triWphnl jburn'eylngs throughlEo - land - . .' \ - � The flag of glory floats!      : And the wild rivers dashing to the deep Still eohA lottd and long,  � And all their silver waves in glory le^ To one Immoirtal song! One soari'ag sbnf of Itbertf and.life. .;''iiiBtwas-�(Bd,fiKty�e:'; Till tyrant.fliigs are triirapledJaIha Arlto And fill the world Is frect! All hail oar opnntrv! In high grace she stands Nor fears the war-drum's bant; i The sword of freedom in her holy hands- The tyrant at her feet! -F. li. Stanton, In Atlanta Constitution. THElrW0'cAPiAIN& BY TOM HXlib ^-VBChioagO'�yQBum Theater, killed'herself in a . , I   'ot Cub�, N. Y., blew out the gas in a hotel in >:4 Biohmond; andvis now in: a serious condition. "  Bome anow fell near Iiexington and Har- rteonburgf Ya.--r-Benjamin Chandler, aged twen^^three yeBrs,was accidentally killed by his brother near Cape Oharles.Ya.-r-Earth-- quft^e shocks were felt in m'any places in the West and South. Nobody was killed, but buildings were damaged in several cities.' At Jamestown, N. Y., Charles Douglass was arrested and charged with mOrdering Mrs. Winslow Sherman and Mrs. Cynthia Davis. -In Denton, Mo., John O'Gorman was shot and mortally wounded by robbers, who -----    ---     . The aisoonery lias been mado that Chicago meroluints have a coruer on woolen plaid goods aud. groen velvets, the oombiaations Whiuh bayo bojome the rage for. women's wear recently.-Fifty; jtudents of the Northwestern University wore .ejected fromttlie Chic'i^o Opera House.atter the first net tor raising such a disturbiinoo that the curtain^ had to bo rung dowa. Tlio South Pnciflc pay  train was wrookod sixty milos oast br'Alpiuo,  Tex. iThe^nglne,^guard"and pay(*�rs"ond '   tho oaSopsd all went into the ditch. Fireman Burr was killbd aud Engineer Lulli badly' Boalde'd. No cause tor the accident iCknoWn'/ -John Oberfeld, a rootor, in Wheellngl \VV ^    Va., fell a distance of sixty feet) sustaining ,    awful"l|njuries.^-rrof|S39r PQJlarcf, of;i?'ieli| moudtj3ollego, was arrest^ |priordo^i''onX :of hist&ivlnlty.st'identa tolilirowa dog out of the wjndow.--^Harvey Thompsou outraged . the te^.year-oldfaau|jiter of Mrs. Crtibtroe; �   /in Ml%o coufe|j(V-;^n;|r-4|^ 8lstaa|forem|n,^thS >YiiipppjHwlU^O^^^ of the.jlled Aiih Coal Company, at Wllices-barro,|wa8 ihstajitly killed on thp colliery's slope'by.belug struck by a loaded qonl cur. Superfntondont' Daniel Thomas was aJso badlyj|utab ut the head, v * - the kai:ahdin a suooess. Boquir^menta Moro Than Mat, �iid Under Adverse ThqJAmmen Bam ICatnhdii) had lior oni. clal t^iU oye^'tUij long Island Somid oourao and mi^de 17. iakuots speed, giving thabuii'd-urs a  lBi'|hBtti,a ^ash^gtii^h,?t ii^i^^e a short camr ^aijtnlrai^baliiie, alrpv^ ikpurc^iit and; then peace-and with peace will come ;;its delightful handmaiden, love.  And ^fhen^then, Mistress Poindexter, 'I shall have th.b honor of claiming you for a bride, of selling ont my oommis-flion and living the quiet life of an ^English country gentleman for, I hope, the rest of my life." "A charming arrangement of events for yourself, my deor Captain Webb! ']But I must say it appears to mens though General Coruwallis's movement into Virginia is moro like a retreat than the advance of a victorious and conquering army. And as for General Greene, they say that be is. not only harassing General Cornwallis at every j|te]):of his northward movement, bnt has'detaohed his cavalry and a portion of bia riflemen to reconquer the Caro-|tnas and Georgia." "00 what utter nonsense do these misguided colonists feed their despairing hopes!" answered the captain. f'Wby, it would be no more ridioalous lor you to assure me that a detaoh-inqnt of Mavion''s outlaws were here, surrounding tljis very bouse, and that I was in danger of becoming aprieoner to them, m to-what was that?" The ptptain jumped hurriedly from his seat and,grasping the railing of the ye-Vuoda in irout of hith for'support, looked nusiously up and dovyn the ifo&i\ that rw in front of the old plan* iatioD. ' "It soGmf)o[' to me "most like tha winding of � horn," said the lady|, oalmJy. 'And, by my faith, X he^rd ths gal',j Joping of horses aud a shoyj pom-? mSnd," continued the captain, ex-QiMlj. � |i garrison at Oharl IfastoQ qtl; their gnardtaudvl expect to appear "at vt he. very g^^ belorel-anirdoue and^'lei^^^fa^m; kisnh thac^^ar;fp!oin.being defeWdi^Sj th^y �diSiilnltl^iiia'eliiSjS^ hf^s^and'jsiohasing Cornwallis him-aelfto't^ sea.   ' V^hat: a romance!" laughed the : ^ '.I wish I had time for romance," Miid theofficer; "there could be no imore .Idelightful opportunity. ^. ,Only :wh^n this waris over will I btf able to ask you to reward a love that has been fajthful'to yon ever since we were children.' But to duty. Are von harboring an English officer hero ?" '--jjjuyT�i'    i^liftv^tlMt    -r-----   - Uittiself, riirliiiwn^il^ with flii�ti�4 oheeka, V'l ii^vtft'ji^tilded to marrjr her, bnt rm blect JT I> don't believe ahe'd m�ke.Awifoti|m!}'(niy manooald beprond 6f."-.ij^tf  Viilicsi!'i|iMea. .. White Oliiiiftie ^Allaiaty not Betting the e:(ample At.pr^^t for the rest of tbe world to pattomdljr* ^iiinwate~bowlB, chpap but strong.^RlU;; whwh', ;it can mnlH>beliejr6'%o\hawi;'^^^ and other.thingo millions of' :gOOd'Xttle,;iB oomin everyji ..^. - -two to baby tal^, -does good;to rtho;:; ^id, ab'miiolK 1 eA and i|not6ei ^Uen'aro"'BlU^vd ^ifcd gravel as mu^ Now York Mail ihe .kind amuse ;^till anotlior the narents be- IITDtrBTMAL AOi'iVitli jthi im^ haidr or ,     .ploy. It gldren, and, itj! ood to the fath"'' >: of-aUithe-ohil-l^feJheNiaiid; %'My desire.^ Sxpress. ?alUa ThfiStsttroT ,^ hands one of the atC record, and the ' watched with; great legal fraternity, as leai Ward. has on its suits on Ivll kvel f'Why, of course L am," she nns-.-wered, laughingly. --. "This is no time for joking,", said, the captain. "If he is not heroi he cannot have baen gone a very, long time; and it you delay ine, he may yet get witbinthe gates of Charleston." "It seems to me that you are atritlo difficult to-day," she replied. "Do you not believe me?" "Of course," he said, biting his lips nervously. "I shall have to search tbe house," he continued. "O, we are quite used to it," she answered. - He ordered up his men and began a systematic search of the mansion and Burrounding buildings. Ha himself, however, stood immovably in front of the door that he knew opened into her private apartments, and permitted no one to enter. The search was therefore useless. "Well," said she, teasingly, "why do you not enter my own room?" "If he is an oflSue'r he should be a 'gentleman, and could not be there," answered' the captain. "You have been foaling me, Phoebe, in order to give him a>tart. I do not blame you. He was a guest and you have but observed the laws of hospitality, even though he is an enemy to our country. Farewell-remember always I shall come to you when this war is finished." "Why not come before-to-night? You. will not wiiih to camp nearer Charleston than this, I ath sure. Grandmother, who is in town 'to-day, shopping, will be back by tea time, and you can tell us all the news." "And may I tell you something else?" "Yea-without even waiting for the war to end. And I will toll you soine-thing, too." The young patriot turned about quickly for a moment-and for a kiss. Then springing into the saddle be'shoutod the commands: "Tohorse, the road to Charleston-gallpp I" and was oflf.  All 0eon as he and his men were well out of sight, the English artillery captain made his appearance. "I suppose," he said, "that I am under obligations to you-and yet I thought your truthfulness would have been the ruination of me." "And could you have admired or Ipved a woman who had deliberately Hod?" "Well, that js rather an odd question. If ,'you had told an untruth it wovild^h^ve bepu in a noble cause. All is fair^iftloVs nnd war, you know." .^joft hidipg m ti womivu'a ap^rtr ment?'^-.-'-' - "Oh, yes-when neoassity compels it,." �      �    � "lYeJl, Captain Webb," eaiij Miss Poindexter, ^Ijnyjy, *^yill you in yvim turn do mea favoir?" "With the greatest pleasure, T ftoi swe," answered the gallant o*pt�in.: 'Will you pleiwe wount yp^v h^MA ftscl |[et �af�ly i>wk mio your �7|� intejfest by \h9. it will determine whether or not a State is responsible for tie acts of the;game animals which it protects for several months in the year. ,        � " � ,   �. The plaintiff ia][Alexander Phair, a Willow Bivcr homesteader, who was some days attacked and badly injured by a moose which he met in the woods while on his way to Grand Bapids. The law says moose cannot be killed for nearly three years yet, and therefore Phair did.not shoot the animal when it rushed at him. .During the fray Phair wob^. knocked down and badly cut up. Hp arrivedat Grand Bapids and at once (instituted : proceedings against the State to recover damages for personal injuries, itlleging that the moose Ie a ward of the. State and tbe latter is responsible'loT the animal's acts. If the case doqies to trial, and Phair says he is in earnest in his suit, he will urge that bo was prevented from defending himself by the fact that he would been seyirely punished had he rkilled the animal.- San Francisco Chronicle. Traces ol i'rehisforic .Men. Some weeks ago a San Diego (Oal.) newspaper reported interesting discoveries made^ on the north slope of San Miguel Mountain by Herman C. Cook and C. .A. Pauvri, two mining prospectors, the discoveries comprising a prehistbrio roadway, a number of ; mining toolii and unmistakable traces of an .ancient mining camp. The stone-paved road was. traced to a wall of solid nnd well-executed masonry. Tbis waa found to surround an inclOsure, now filled with debria but which is believed to be an oldarastra. Near this araBtra was discovered tbe mouth oI a tunnel filled with debris. In tbe vicinity are nlso traceable the foundations of no less than nineteen small houses. It is believed that the cleaning of tlj^e tunnel and the pushing of tbe investigation into the tunnel will lead to more interesting dis.-coyeries thau ony yet made bearing on the life of ancient man in this region.-Ohjoago Times-Herald. - 6:unK tbe Axo Into JIi� Back. The Episi^palians gave a harvest festival at Nelson's Opera House, Mount Clemens, MioU, On the pro-grammp wag a farce in which Cab Kiels and Calvin Davis took leading parts, iiiela WAS tp pick up an axe and bit Davis in the bnok, where the latter had %bb((�4^.9Uooaled under his vest. Kiels's iuteutipi}. was to uiiok the axe into the hpard, but he miqsed his aim, .(jnd inslieaa of striking the board, sunk the ttsa JQtp Davis's back, Davis rushed behind the ourti^iu and the wildest cQufneion" fplip,wed; Several WOBiou in, the audtejipj faiigtp^, Pl"-Wils^^, .wUp' wa presehtj? ftitendcd tUe: woiihdad n|tai;i, Wh^le the out is a seripHs^p^ie th$ doctor apprehends Mil'i&sultj. Btela feeis dppply �9gf$t;ill pvei: tho G^i^hi^p.-T-Ohicasfu From Lbulalana to Ontario the Shoolr. Waa Felt, Although the Damaca Dona   Waa SIlBht-Llka the Charleaton  JDieturbanoo, A.sorlGS oil severe elrtK(}itnke shocks shortly after 8 0;�ia>Bk4atl^ onnsod a i(en�r�l fiatilo thnohgltput Illlitolir, Missouri, Wisconsin, Indiana and Ohio, and in part of Kontuoky, Tennessee, lionlsinna and Mlohl-gaii. The movement seemed to be from iSnst toAvpsfc. � v: In Chicago a shock that lasted nearly a oilnnto rooked buildings and temporarily routed thbir sleeping Inhabitants, Telegraph and telephone employees who were on duty wore badly frightened, those on tho eleventh Boor of tho Western Union building being dashed off their chairs and thrown violently against the wall.   . . The shook was unnoeompanlodby any aud-Ibleriimbllng, coming from tho lake nnd disappearing across the prairies. It was most leveroly felt on the North Side. In tlie wood--en houses of Buona Park and other North Side suburbs, the shaking up was so poroop-tlblo that many persons dashed out of tlioir houses In scanty clothing. During the shook and for several hours after tho eleotrlolty in the atmosphere was oppressive to persons of a nervous temperament. No damage was done, but In many .houses - pioturos wore thrown to the lloor and crockery broken. Cairo felt two shocks, one nt 6.09. nnd another fifteen minutes later. The public library building was badly damajod, and people loft their houses tor safety. Many obim-noys were shaken down. Other Illinois towns report distinct shocks at about the same time. At liOUSiviUe three torriflo shooks of earthquake wore felt at &.15 o'clock In the morn-Ingi The flrst Avns prooodod by a mlRhly roar like that of;dlstont thunder. This shook lasted fiillv twenty sooonds, and a second-and third, no qnito so violent^ lasted about twelve jouonds. Tho vibrations wore from l^c�laoo by Milwaukee partlM; a rice mill at New Orleans, a $200,000 water works : company at Algiers and a sugar refinery, at Abbeville, La,; a $60,000 shoo company at Cumberland Md.i arrangements progressing In   good shape for the oonstruotlon: of an eleotrio ppwer plant on the Susquehanna Blver to develop upwards of 20,000 horse power; a $380,000 gas company at Washington; a $60,-000company organized to oreota tannery in North Carolina; a olothbig factory at Clarks-yllle,Tenn.; a 25-ton cottonseed oil mill nt liUlIng, Texas; n $60,000 company -organized to operate bridge and Iron constructing works ot Boonoke;.a woodworking plant at Fredericksburg, iind new Iron.ore. mines at several points in Southwest Tirginta; a $80,000 coal and ooko oompnny|a $50,000 supplyoompany at Fairmont, W..Va.; a railroad repair shops atHunti'ngton.  v       .\ The railroad business' and ^banl;'>oleariii|^ throughout the South ooat^uo..tp,v.^E^on showing a steady expansion,via / the^rSplum�i of trade; while the general outlook promises; a opntlnuatlon of the Improvement apwk^ progress, Th* Oham'bar of Daputlaa Votad A Waht of oenfkl�m�^M�inb�r� .   of farllameAt  PfbttAittM from Joining rinartelAf    \ .   .  Cyndloataa. The Prenoh cabinet ralgned ob a raiqlt of a'gbvemment defeol in the Chamber of f>ep-'titieB.durfng'^he'debale..on Southern ftrflway 'Wandolt-ouff IP'reBMent' FiittrehaB oeoqtted Ihd refligin'atiofis. .  '   iiiv.    , In the Chamber df_ Depu'ties', M. RUBMMt, ' who has been prominent hi exposlni^ thofle" who were Odahected wJth the Panama can'al. and RonOieni Ballroad syndico^, queetlpiied' the Government   regardlng^the South 1 of France,Ballroad-Beandal,- it befaig alleged that a number At Senators, Deputleif'i^d oth-eia have made large ^proflta ont ot'.' ^jjjfjjf poay.bjr. fair and.nalaif,nieaiu^_^^^mluared , 41i|l^ijji�Md repute ot I^aofs^'i^ was involved and oaled'ftrr-^x^lSnaMons as to the partiality wiilehhM beinihoWn toward thoM lavolviid'intlto woadala^claimiaf that�;flie aathpjMai Mid been i^Idto proBeoutetlpn h; because thebeputies 4>d Senators Invol^.' with the iate Baron Belnaoh, of Panama canal fam4, had disposed of 85,000 francs in devious ways, and on behalf of tbe Southern : -railways he demanded that tho minister of-Justloe, M. Tirarlottx, publish the documents in the casd which were in his possession ond which would throw light on tho suhjecti' M. Binder, a member ot the rights then Charged the minister ot justice with culpable leniency and demanded that the guilty pfur' ties be punished. M. Trarfeux replied, saying that wh'onever ' tho government believed (shad inorimlaat-Ing evidence it had prosednted tBe parties In- ^ volved. No Deputy, he added, was included among tboiguilty parties. ; Amid continual, radical intern^>tion, M. Trarleux managed to say to oddiUoii that~ several names were -known to the govern-' mont as having figured in reports of the ex- . port, M. Floiy, the offlolal acconntant, who made an. Inquiry into' tho finances o'f the South of France Ballroad. He was int'er-ruptod by excited cries pf "Names," "names," "names!" In reply M.'Trarleux said: "Bouvler, Jules Booho, Etienne, Delonole, Bardonx  and. others."    When ho was able to make himself heard the minister of justice added that the majority of those whose names had been mentlonr-* had explained their position, and he concl tiEAMSKA the debt statement. An Inoreauo of Over $6|000|000 for Last Month Beported. Tho monthly stiitoment of tho piiblio debt just Issued at tho Tfbiwury Departinojit Hhows tlie dobt, loss cash in tho Troasmy, to bo 11(916,431,103, which is an iuoroaHB for the month of *5,3U,472, which is aooouutod for" by the loss of *5,457,S64 in the cash in th�. Treasury. Following is n recapitulation ot the debt:-- luterost-beariug debt.........   ^747,361,560 Uobt on which interest has ceused since maturity.......        1,681,670 Jiaht bearing no interest......     377,835,870 Total dobt.................. *1,126,379,106 This does not include $591,102,673 in oer-tlflontes and Treasury notes outstanding, offset by a an equal amount � of oxsh in the Treasury.  TJio oa.sb In the Treasury is classified as follows:- qold......................... $lil3,360;838 Silver.................... 503,083,138 Paper.............. lB0,i'80;447 yond.s, disbursing oflloers'bal- �- anoes, etc----,V...... 16.613,185 Total.......... .V...,,.   $8*8,W7,�iqL Cents omitted. � � ji- Against this there are demand lialiiUtlBS imoun^lng to $689489,612, wh^b We* a M#h')9lajafOff |^y^|87^, ^ ; ^ aeneikl Onffi�ia Sayi Thty Art tfaitsd' Btstts Territory. Tbe report of tho joint coaunlsstonera appointed under the ooftventlon made ia 1892 between Great Britain and. the United States for the survey ot the territory of the United States and Canada, adjacent to the boundary line dividing Alaska and Canada, will be made in tho course of the next three months. . ' ; In somo respects a more interesting problem, whioh General Duflleld, chief of the geodetic and coast survey Is now at work on, is the determination of the points at which the one liundrod'and forty.ifln^t degree of longitude, (the.eastern boundary ot-Alaska) crosses the Forty-Mllp oreek and the Yukon river, ns the boundary ..may Involve the ownership of some of the old prop-  ertlcs now developing there,. Oglesvle, a British oincer, determined these .pohits astronomically in 1889. By his observations the one hundred and forty-flrst parallel crossed Forty-Mile creek eight and three-quartei miles from the mouth, or. junction., with the Yukon river, and left, the bend of the lattbi river in Canadlon territory. His line, however, vfua fixed entirely t)y ostromicul obser* vation. General BulBeld's line will. also be made from ostromipal observatipna, but he has other data which Ogtesvle did not have, with which to check poaslble errprs. The ' latitude and'longltudie of Ganip Davidson, upon the Yukon has been absolutely fixed from.a long seriesof;observations. From that point the country has been trlangiilated to the Yuicpn and a transverse line has been run all the way to the hpad. ot Fprty-Mlle crook. This work has bepjaiji progress'since 1390, and the final calculations will be obin-pletod In about throe weeks. � Qeneral Duflleld does not. expect the lln� to vary very muoh from Oglesyle, iohd' from tho Information he has' he gives it as bii ophildh that all of the good properties otth4 Yukon and Fprty-Mllo orbek are within th�. jurisdiotidn of the United States. So faJr w ho has been informed, and the report ot' th� Oovoruor of Alaska agrees with the Information, all tho gold discoveries have Beau to the west of a line drawn from Cape Barrou to tho extreme Southern point of ^ Alaska, all of which Is In the United States territory. ded with tho remark: "The Chamber the truth, and if Parliament Considers li nity and .honor compromised the goveriitK^ willjofn the Chamber In voting for repress ^^jI .sive measures, and^n the face of these ox-      " : plahatlons asks the Chamber for a: vote - of oonlldeuoe." - The'p^er of the day, pure and siDiplo, was � thon.sttb'mltteciito thaiClhambor and rejected by a.yote. of 406 to 105." K'^aberts tJien moyoid that the ^ Choij&ber ^ ogi^ to'j>rohlblt memliofs of Parliament ^ from joining In flnanolaf qrAdlootea." - The ^ Later M.\Bouanet snJM^ a %otlpn dio-'^-''^ monding thlit foUUghtbe thrown.- upon the ^ Seulh of Franoe Ballroad spandals, asking the government to prosecute all. those who hovo been found to be Implicated In them and submit to the Chamber the; report oLfte expert ' who inquired Into the finances of the^com-t)(iny. _�� , �       _,,-v-__^- M. lilbot thereupon said It was useless to submit the expert's report, and as to the prosecutiohs; he added, the work of Justice had been accomplished and.could not be rc-oponed. M. liouanot's motion, asking for an explanation as to tho partiality which had been shown toward those involved in the scandals, oliUmlng that the authorities had beenafroid 'io 'prosecute them and' demanding that the minister ot justice publish the documents in the case which were in his posseesloo, waa then adopted by a vote of 285 to 196.. After the adoption of this motion the ministers left the Chamber of Deputies in a body, dmld Ironical radical cheers, and. went to the BIysee Paloce, where they handed in their resignations to President Faure. The Chamber ot Deputies was adjourned tor a week. M Sis*! moee troops for ouba. . � ~      � '� .H't' � �� Thousands of Addltiooiil Soldiers Will:-B9 Sent From Spaiai Tho Spanish papers state that 35,000 troops will be sent to Cuba forthwith and additional reinforooinonts will be sent as required. Be-ports rocoivud in Madrid are tcT the effect that tho Insurgents ooutlnuo to burn Villases and plantations and to ntteinpt to dynn.oiito tbo railroad.s. H.WA.SA.-Urigajier-Qonoral Oliver had lui ouoountor with tha insurgents at tho planta tion ot Siui Au.i,'U3tiii. Tha Insurgent lieu-tanant, Vorgiiia, iia.i throo moro wera killed and of tlio troopa four wor-j wouiulod. Colonel Zuliiii, iit tha huai of 50ii troops, took tho iusur)>i>nt,c""ip at Mount Yugunjay, district of UeniodiSs, iifcor an engagement in whioh the insurgents uro said to have suffered a numerous loss. The troops ha-.l wounded, - live  'ThaKiifg of A^anti hta j:gjoeted_Ui9 Ifrit-Ish demand for 4 resident oommlssjo'is*'. his o'p'ufttry, suying-.thtrt- IW .pfoferred WW. aud WW proparad (or it,''. '.c',he Brltlsliare e*j |�ected to take the hiitiativ� by t^ ead pi ikf THE YEAR IN THE NAVT. tdmiral Btma�y Oivei Statiitiar and Vat ColUgt �   ' Prograia U Bsported. Admiral Bamsey, Chief of the Bureau of Kavlgatlon, in his annual report to theSecre-kary of the Navy; shows that during the past yeor 3,912 men and 34S apprentices were enlisted In tho navy. More than 25 per cent enlisted under the continuous service. Seven hundred and ilftoen men and one hundred and seventy-three i4iprentloes dsserted, and of this number tiSS men and 161 a{)pretttice3 , deserted in home ports. Forty-eight me-i and ten boys died. At the close of the year aioro than 31 per cent, of the onlisted. men of the navy were 'seh-lng under obhtinuous sarvloe, more th4n 69 per-cent, wbro Amerl- ' Dan citizens and 81 per cent."of the       ircra-' Amerioan born. ' . ponded report by Captain Taylor, was of ex-tremo Importanco, andwHl be' of groat popu- . lar Interest. The principal problem has tor Its theatre the Now Kngland Const from Niiu-tucket northward. The conditions as they might actually exist at the present day gave the enemy a force three times as strong as ours, and suppose liis objeotivo to be the oooupation of-Boston and Portland and the neighboring - coast. ' The solution of this problem will b? made to the department as a confl'dentlal document.  Anqthor problem which Capta'n , Taylor says excited great interest at this time was intended to give etteut to the department's expressed desire to begin tliestrateglo study of the Oarrlbean Sea and tho Gulf of Mexico, and the solution ot this also will be submitted to tbo departweut at an early day, A new feature Intrpduoed this year was the study of navt^l tactical situation.^ as distinguished from strfitegioal problems ba$ed ujion tho"molkods employed liu hi� "UetK'al problems" by Von Mpltke to train tho Oer- � � incw) pjjfioofs to m*ko quiyl; 4eci*lons In sud-- , den emergenaios iu fac� of ,the enemy. Tfce . other eJi.erois8ii of the course wtUed cluetty   ' iipon the mure ileiiber|4tp quali(tts ot thtt loix >yhlcU \v�3 the objoot o| tfti;ti )|' (im , \ lUipdt>xp^^ti�tt )>�.    .  , .... .A X�irlu>ht'^ woman says th# the- WlMiOf rP! i�oaouno�4 tore, to - .   

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