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Bennington Evening Banner Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1955 - Page 1

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Publication: Bennington Evening Banner

Location: Bennington, Vermont

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 15, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER FIFTy-SECOND PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1955 WEATHER: Cloudy, cold, possible light snow, tonight and Sunday. Little Willie Just Made the Discovery Today That the Eight-Ball is the Place Behind Which There is Definitely No Housing Shortage. SAYS CHOU OFFERED NO DEAL FOK RELEASE OF U. S. Na- tions Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold faces photographers during a news con- ference at UN headquarters in New York Jan. 14. He said Red China's Chou En-Lai raised a number of questions during their Peiping talks, but that he definitely had laid down no conditions for the release of 11 American fliers held in China. Hammar- skjold said he had achieved what he was "aiming at" during his visit to Peiping.0 Hammarskjold Assured Of U. S. Support In Further Efforts To Obtain Release Of II Airmen Panama Assembly Impeaches Pres. Jose Guizado PANAMA National As- sembly ordered the arrest and im- peachment of President Jose Ra- mon Guizado today after a Pana- manian lawyer confessed the Jan. 2 assassination of President Jose Antonio Remon Uuizado. and In a special predawn session, the assembly denied Guizado's request for a leave of absence pending in- vestigation of the charges against him. The lawmakers voted after hear- ing the chamber clerk read a con- fession in which Atty. Ruben Miro admitted the machinegunning of Remon. The session had been called to consider Guizado's request for a leave. The president has been un- der house arrest since yesterday Ricardo Arias Espinosa, second vice president and foreign minis- ter, was summoned to the morn- ing session in the Assembly hall. He is next in line for the chief executive's chair after Guizado. Miro's confession said the mur- der plot was carried out at the in- stigation and with the knowledge of Guizado and the Matter's busi- ness partner, Rodolfo Saint Malo. It said Guizado's son Jose Ramon Jr. also was in the plot. WASHINGTON Secre- cary General Dag Hammarskjold was assured today of full U S. sup- port for his further efforts to 'ob- tain the release of 11 American airmen imprisoned in Red China. The assurance came from Pres- ident Eisenhower who said the "fundamental thing" is the safe return of the airmen, and added in a public statement. "We must support the UN in its efforts so long as those efforts 'hold out any promise Of success." implicated The statement was issued yes- terday in what was reported to be a move to lorestall tough talk from members of Congress and others, lest this in some manner endanger the safety of the imprisoned, men or their chances for freedom. Administration officials are pri- vately hopeful Hammarskjold's re- cent mission to Peiping will lead eventually to the release of the airmen and possibly other U. N. personnel held by the Chinese Reds. Hammarskjold told a news con- ference in New York yesterday his missiot} had constituted a success- ful first step and the way for further negotiation was open. But he gave no details. Hammarskjold reported, presum- ably m detail, to Ambassador Hen- ry Cabot Lodge Jr. at U.N. head- quarters and yesterday Lodge rp- ported to Secretary of State Dulles at Omaha, Neb where both had gone for a briefing on the opera- tions of the Strategic Air Com- mand. MBS. FARLEY Eliz- abeth Farley, 60, wife of James A. Farley, .f Postmaster General and former National Democratic Chairman, died of a hiart attack Jan. 14 In the Far- leys' Waldorf-Astoria apartment in New York. The younger Guizado, Saint Malo Dulles talked with Eisenhower and Tomas Nicves Perez, anothe. member of the construction firm headed by the president, were ar- rested yesterday, Miro said he had been prom- ised the government and justice ministry ln the national Cabinet his reward for the assassina- tion of Remon. He said no money was involved. According to the confession, made to authorities yesterday, Miro earned out the killing alone He said he borrowed the machine- by telephone and the presidential statement was released after that talk. The President said first reaction to the failure to obtain immediate lelease of the airmen "quite na- turally is disappointing." "All of us are rightly the President added, "that our air- men have not been long since re- leased by their Communist cap- tors in accordance with the clear tetms of the Korean armistice." The men weio taken by the Chi- gun used in the shooting fiom a j nese Reds two years ago during Panamanian who formerly attend- ed a technical school in Guate- 'rnala. Miro's contession was read by the Assembly's clerk to the spe- cial session, which began only a few hours "after Guizado sent the chamber's president his request for a leave. the Korean War. Last November the Peiping regime suddenly an- nounced they had been sentenced as spies on charges the United States denounced as baseless. After the announcement of the sentences, various demands were made, chiefly in Congress, that the United States take strong Guizado acted after Cabinet min- j blockading the China coast if nec- isters. called at his police-guarded essary to force the release of home to inform him officially of the charges against him. The pres- ident reportedly asked to be given until 9 a.m. to decide his next the men. Eisenhower said ir his statement yesterday "it will not be easy for us to refrain from -giving expres- stop but authorities apparently sion to thoughts of reprisal or re- were determined to press for his taliation "Yet this (expression) is removal from office. In his message to the Assembly what we must not now do. "We ttill not fall into a Com- Guizado said he was asking for rnunist trap and through impetuous ----._, __._ words or deeds endanger the lives of those imprisoned airmen who wear the uniform of our the leave "until the acts imputed to me through the senseless dec laratiems made by Ruben Miro are cleared up." A lawyer in his early 40s, Miro is widely known as an "official legal officer whose duty it is to defend persons too poor to afford counsel. Invite Public To See Films On Moose Projects Dems Say Own Hunt Is Answer To Sen. McCarthy WASHINGTON Iff) Democratic senators said today their party's future activities in ferreting out Communists will answer a bitter challenge flung by Sen McCarthy (R Wis) at their leaders' sincerity. The Senate by unanimous 84-0 vote yesterday approved a resolu- tion denouncing communism and endorsing continued investigation ol the Communist conspiracy. Rhode sland football team for the House action is not required. The resolution, sponsored by Son. Dan- iel (D-Tex) and 53 other senators, was approved by the votes of 37 Democrats, 46 Republicans and one independent. But McCarthy questioned some Democrats' sincerity, saying he thinks some voted for the resolu- tion to get "the stench from their hands and the mud from their skirts" lesulting, he said, from prior conduct. Twice1 McCarthy was required by Sen Long the tempo- rary presiding officer, to halt his speech and be seated on grounds he had violated Senate rules against imputing "unworthy or un- becoming" conduct to other sen- ators. Each time he was allowed to resume. Sen. Kuchel (R Calif) challenged McCarthy similarly on another oc- casion, but Long did :not halt the Wisconsin sena'tor a third time. Long told reporters today ''there is a determination among the Dem- ocfatic leaders to expose commu nism wherever it might be" on the American scene "The record will speak for itself on the effort's to investigate and to ferret out subversive activities." He said he lopes and believes it will be a ;ood record. Sen. McC'ellan who has over from McCarthy the 'manship of the Senate Inves- tigations sub'Tnimi'Ve. said "the 111.. record a1 make in the Congress T will be a'good ono jiij rn'c, it will Area Labor Market Conditions Continued Unfavorable Last Month; Little Hiring Was Done Construction Was At Standstill Labor market conditions in the Bennington area continued general- ly month, accord- ing to a report on December activ- ities released today by the local office of the Vermont Unemploy- ment Compensation Commission. With layoffs continuing in effect throughout the area, little hiring was evident. Retail trade, where additional workers were needed to take care of the seasonal holiday rush, was an exception. Other job opportunities were at a low ebb, while construction was at a stand still. Job openings filled for employers totaled 79, against 55 in November and 48 a year ago in December Among the persons placed in jobr were 18 women andx37 veterans Wholesale and retail trade, service private households, machinery, fur- niture, lumber, construction, and farming accounted' for the majority of the month's placemepts. The weekly wages involved were val- ued at for those placements expected to last a week or longer. New registrations for work total- ed 106, including 36 frqm women and 21 veterans. At the end of the month 404 jobseekers were regis- tered. A year ago registrations numbered 437 and in November 360. Employers listed 120 openings the month. These demands came from lithographic, wire, pa- per, lumber, government, and ag- riculture. Job opportunities still open on December 31st numbered 57, against 39 a month previously and 55 a year ago. By occupation these jobs included openings for account- ant, secretary, stenographer, sales- man, autp mechanic foreman, silk screen cutter, clerk, sales clerk, cashier, dining room maid, maid-general, and child monitor. Initial claims for unemployment insurance filed during the month totaled 215, compared with 199 in November. Job losses in the fol- lowing industries accounted for most of these claims: apparel, services, wholesale retail trade, lumber, furniture, pa- per, miscellaneous manufacturing textile, and construction. Weeks of continued unemploy- ment claimed in December ran as follows: Weeks Claimed 248 Week Ending Dec. 4 Dec. 11 Dec.-18 Dec. 25 Jan. 1 343 273 379 299 The total volume ran well ahead of that of the corresponding per- iod a year ago. This was reflected in an average insured unemploy- ment rate of 6 1 per cent against 5 2 per cent for Devember 1953. The claims figures, it was point- ed out, include those filed by vet- erans under the Federal readjust- ment act. The Commission regu- lates such claims in Vermont un- der an agreement with the U. S. Department The area served by the Commis- sion's local office covers all of Ben- nington County. Itinerant service in Arlington and Manchester is fur- nished on the second and fourth Readsboro by appointment. Proposed Personal Income Tax Hikes Have Only Slight Dollar Effect on Payers, Say Officials SAAR come in handy as French Premier Pierre Mendes-France, left, and West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer get together at Baden- Baden, Germany, Jan. 14, to discuss mutual problems. Chief topic of discussion on tap was the question of the Saar, strategic industrial area which long has been a subject of controversy between Warld War Jl enemies. Premier Mendes-France came to West Germany from Borne where he met with Italy's leaders. Howard Mattison Files Independent Petition For Highway Position T. Howard Mattison of Chapel road, incumbent District One road commissioner, announced today he has filed as an independent candi- date for re-election to that posi- tion. Mattison was defeated by Albert ElweH of the Chapel road at the Republican caucus held January 8. Elwell tallied 117 votes to Mat- tison's 104. The independent candidate wil seeking election to his fourth term as a road commissioner. (Vermont Press Bureau) MONTPELIER The Johnson administration's proposed hike in personal income taxes, designed to raise more a year in state revenue, would have only a slight dollar impact on most Ver- mont taxpayers, the tax depart- ment indicates. Statistics compiled by the state :ax agency said that only 10.5 per cent of the Vermont taxpayers would have increased tax bills of i25 or more annually. Twenty-eight per cent of the tax- payers would have increases of or less in the amount of income ar paid the state, 26 per cent would be increased to and 13.5 per cent would pay to a year more Another 22 per cent who file re- urns with the department have no ax clue and will not be affected jy the 33 and one-third per cent ncrease recommended by Gov. oseph B. Johnson to help balance lis fiscal budget. The tax department study said hat taxpayers with taxable income up to would have increased ax liability in varying amounts up to a year. The analysis contained a, com- parison of taxes due under the pre- ent rates and those due under the ohnson administration's recom- nended increase. The examples in the comparison, which follows, woulti be in cases where three ex- emptions are claimed such as husband, wife and one child and where the standard 10 per cent de- duction is taken. Gross Proposed Present Dollar Income Rates merit in sport in 1954" by the sports lodge of B'nni B'rith Jan 23. Brenner, 21, of R.I., is totally deaf. BENNINGTON CLUB SNACKS SUNDAY: 6 to S John Hosts: Zyno Carl Williams j charge at the Stark Theatre at 2 I p m Sunday j In technicolor, the films are en- titled "The Story of Moosehart, the Child City" and "Moosehaven, Home of the Aged." The showing will continue for about two hours. Officers of the Loyal Order o f Moose, Bennington, have invited the public to view the movies as a part of the local Lodge's eighth anniversary celebration, his first in the Senate since that body voted 67-22 last month to condemn his attacks on two Senate committees and some of their individual mem- bers. After the vote, McCarthy lashed at House Democratic leaders. He accused them of refusing Rep. Martin Dies (D-Tex) a seat on the House Un-American Activities committee, and said the refusal shows the Dem. party is controlled coo Rates Increase The tax department said that I due on 1953 income represent- ...1 1.30 per cent of the gross m- reported by Vermonf tax- payers. Under the proposed in- crease, it added, the tax due would represent approximately 1.68 per cent of gross income. (which) certainly has coddled, cov- ered up and nurtured treason." Dies, a former chairman of that committee, has sought unsuccess- fully to regain a seat on it since his return to Congress two years ago. The place he sought this year went instead to Rep. Willis who outranked Dies in seniority. BIG JAMBOREE "K. of C." HALL TONIGHT _ S TO 10 P. Bt. OAS Puts Finger On Nicaragua In Costa Rica Row WASHINGTON,   count at noon on Saturday when a total of mone than skiers for the weekend was tallied. "Good" to "excellent" skiing conditions at all County areas have been reported and an additional at- traction, the 1955 USESA Veterans' Alpine Championships, is schedul- ed this weekend at Big Bromley in Manchester. s A light snowstorm which broke over the county at about a. m. is expected to improve conditions and lure, additional skiers to the county. In Bennington, the Putnam Hotel said it provided lodging for more than 125 skiers Friday evening and was forced to turn away an addi- tional 75 persons. A ski bus fromjNelson Jackson, 82, former physi- Vermont Paid In War Bonuses Maximum Is Monlpelier Vermont has paid 88 in soldiers bonuses to veterans of World War II and those who entered service follow- ing the Korean emergency. The state auditor's office said has been paid to World War II veterans and anoth- er to 1he Korean ser- vicemen and women. Maximum payments under the Vermont program Eire There is still a balance of 265.97 in the appropriation for World War II bonuses. The bal ance in appropriations to pay bo- nuses since the Korean war broke out June 27, 1950, is Officials in the auditor's office said bonuses were paid t o World War II vets by the end of December, 1954. There are still World War II claims filtering in, ranging from one to four a month. An additional have been paid to Korean vets. The bonus automatically expir- es on June 30 unless it is re-enact- ed by the legislature. Gov. John- son made no reference to it in his budget message and included n o money for it in the fiscal p r o gram. The last legislature appropriated a total of to pay for bonuses to people entering ser vice up to 1his coming June 30. The balance in the account is es- timated to be enough to cover bo- nuses for those entering service up till then. Continuation of the program for another biennium would require additional appropriations, accord- ing to state fiscal officers. Village President Harold Griffin today announced would seek a fourth term. It had been rumored that Ward 3 Trustee James Gibney had planned to seek the nomination if Griffin decided not to run. Griffin, a past commander of Bennington Legion Post 13, is a member of the Village Committee for City Government. He is a resident of Fillmore street and is manager of M. E. R.udd Electrical Company. Griffin was first elected vil- Desert Manhunt- Yields Body of High Speed Flier LOS ANGELES body of world speed pilot James B. Verdin, 36, who bailed out of his bantam, jet bomber six miles above the earth Thursday, has been found after perhaps "the biggest search ever made on the Mojave Desert. The Douglas Aircraft Corp. test pilot lay miles from the wreck- age of his A4D Skyhawk when searchers reached the body yes- terday. The plane wreckage had been found the night before, 15 miles northwest of Victorville and 100 miles northeast of here. Vcrdm's unopened parachute was still strapped to his body. The plane's ejection seat lay nearby, indicating the pilot had cleared the seat as he began his fall to earth. Col. Howard Knapp, surgeon gen- leral at Edwards Air Force Base near (ho crash scene, said Verdin age president in 1952 when he apparently died on impact rather defeated George H. Plumb forjlh5n the post. Incumbent Griffin will seek re- :iomination the Citizens Cau- cus to be held Jan. 22 at 8 p. m. at the Armory. Col. Jackson, Father of Legion In Vermont, Dies BURLINGTON, Vt. H. New York City brought many per- sons there, and a New Jersey ski club, traveling in private cars, was also reported as registered at the hotel. Hotel officials said they the week' end. Two motels picked at random re- ported heavy business. One owner said his motel was filled Friday evening with three-fourths of the occupants being skiers, and regis- trations being made at 8 a. m. to- day have already accounted for all available space there over the weekend. In Manchester, the central book- ing office reported it was "swamp- ed" at 11 a. m. with skiers seeking accommodations. The Manchester Chamber of Commerce also report- ed that a heavy volume of ski business is anticipated. At Mount Snow in West Dover, spokesmen said a new rope tow installed this past week will be opened above {he main chair lift this afternoon to reduce waiting lines and make available additional trails at the higher elevations. Mt. Snow now has two lifts and two tows m operation. Weather forecasts for the week- end call for increasing cloudiness and continued cold today with oc- casional light snow. Considerable cloudiness, with little temperature change and snow flurries are indi- cated for Sunday. States and Ecuadorean planes have been flying "peaceful obser- vation missions" over northern Costa Rica, cian, banker, newspaper publisher, radio station owner and American Legion official, died last night at Bishop De Goesbriand Hospital. An infantry officer in World War I, Jackson was wounded and won the nation's second highest award for heroism. He also was decorated by the French government. One of the organizers of the American Legion, Jackson served as national vice commander in 1921-22. He was known as "The Father of the American Legion in Vermont." Majorette Pageant Comes Next Saturday Martial music will fill the air and Bennington High School will be the center of a colorful spectacle next Saturday night as the second annual Majorette Pageant unfolds. Invitations have been extended to baton twirlers from neighboring schools and the Benhi Band Direc- tor Darcy B. Davis Jr. said to- day that acceptances have been received from North Bennington High School, North Adams Drury High School and Cambridge High School. It is expected that others will be heard from, the forepart of next week. William O'Brien of Holyoke, Mass., official judge and promi- nent in baton twirling circles in the East, will again score the com- petition. A captain of next year's Benhi majorette corps will be pick- ed and also three replacements for the senior corps. The program starts at 7 o'clock. The public is cordially invited. It could not be determined im- mediately why Vrrdin was unable to get tile chute open, Douglas offi- cials said Neither was it learned at once if he was wearing a standard-type parachule, requiring a manual pull to open il, or an automatic tvpo pic set lo open at a given altitude. More than ground search- ers and scores of Air Force, Navy, sheriff's and Douglas planes fanned out over a mile area in the 23-hour search for Verdin after he tersely radioed Edwards AFB, "I m in trouble. I'm leaving." He didn't have time to say what the trouble was. lie was testing the Skyhawk in the to altitude rangu. The plane, called the "Mighty Midget" by Navy fliers, is capable of flying 600 m. p. h. A .former Navy lieutenant com- mander, Verdin set the world's three-kilometer jet mark of 753.4 m p h on Oct 5. 1953. Vordin, a native of Miles City, JMont, was a graduate of the Na- val Academy and received a mas- ter's degree from the University of Minnesota He served in the Navy fiom 1941 to 1954, earning the Navy Cross, Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with six stars. He is survived by his widow, three small children and a 12-year- old daughter by a previous mar- riage. NEWSPAPER! LAWTON, Ok'a. El- rod, weather heie, ex- citedly reported .15 of m inr h of rain yesterday, a veritable deluge in parched southwestern Okla- homa. Then she recalled only a light shower had fallen. "Some prankster must have water in the she said sheepishly. MOOSE MEMBERS Meet at Lodge Rooms at p. m., Sunday to pay last re- spects to Brother Harry Bichter. NEWS PA PER fl R C H1V EC   

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