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Bennington Evening Banner: Friday, January 14, 1955 - Page 1

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 14, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER FIFTY-SECOND PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1955 WEATHER: Fair, cold tonight; Saturday, cliance of light snow. Someone Told Little Willie That the Conservative is a Fellow Who Thinks We Went Wrong When the Price of a Blue Serge Suit Went Up From WHICH WAY IS Wright of suburban East Aurora, N. Y., makes an un- conventional exit from a conventional truck, after the vehicle skidded and overturned on a downtown Buffalo street. Wright, though shaken up, was uninjured. Lodge Expresses Optimism American Airmen To Be Freed By China; Gets Dag Report UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. UP) General Dag Ham- marskjold said today that Red China's Chou En-lai raised a num- ber of questions, including a U.N. seat, during their Peiping talks but that he definitely had laid down no conditions for release of the 11 American fliers held there. The secretary general, in a Defendant Wins Auto Suit; Next Case Is Monday Bennington County Court re- cessed yesterday afternoon after the jury returned a verdict in news conference, declared had achieved what he was "aiming at" during his visit to Peiping. favor of Charles J. Sherman of Rupert, defendant in a automobile suit brought against him by Richard Carruth of Ben- nington. The court will re-convene Mon- day at p.m. with a jury case. Dr. Mason B. Barney, osteopath, of Manchester is defendant in a negligence suit filed by Edgar W. Johnson Jr, also of Manchester. A verdict in the first case was returned by ihe jury at 2 p.m. yesterday. Carruth was suing for damages sustained- by his car in an accident in Hoosick Feb. 6. UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. Chief U. S. delegate Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., expressing a measure of optimism, went to Washington for high level talks today on the problem of releasing 11 American fliers imprisoned by Red China. After receiving a full report from U.N. Secretary General Dag Ham- marskjold on his mission to Pei- ping, Lodge said he was confident progress had been made and "that our fliers will be free." Lodge said he would consult with ctll CHJUlUdll. 111. J- TT__, Attorney for the defendant was Secretary of State Dulles on Ham- __ vonnrt ac snnn as DOS- Clayton H. Kinney of Rutland. Loveland and Hackel of Rutland represented the plaintiff. In the case coming up Monday, Johnson is suing for injuries suf- fered when a tear gas device ex- ploded at Dr. Barney's home Dec. 11. Johnson was employed by the doctor at the time of the accident. As a result of the explosion he lost the sight of one eye and par- tial vision of the other. Attorney for the defendant is Clayton Kinney. Lawrence and O'Brien are counsel for the plaintiff. marskjold's report as soon as pos- sible. "There is naturally disappoint- ment that the immediate release of our fliers was not he said, "but I am confident that progress has been made and that our fliers will be free. "Assuredly we will not Ice Conditions Good At Memorial Park and Y Pool Skating Rinks After two weeks of building an ice base at Memorial Park, Village Recreation Committee and YMCA officials announced this morning that outdoor skating has been en- joyed for two days and ice con- ditions are termed "good" today. Officials said that as long as the weather remains cold, they will be able to maintain the skat ing rink. However, until there is snow on the ground to keep a steady temperature, the ice is apt to melt slightly with warmer tem- Hoiise Has Passed Three Bills; Has Advanced Others MONTPELIER, House passed its first three bills today and advanced nearly a dozen others, including a measure to step up control of brucellosis. The bills passed raise the pay of constables serving at elections and of agents appointed by coun- ty road commissioners to make highway repairs and allow chil- dren and persons in the armed forces to fish through the ice. The present ice fishing law al lows' persons Holding licenses to fish through the ice, but makes no provision for persons who do not need licenses, such as per- sons 15 and under'and persons in the armed forces. The brucellosis bill would al- low use of state- funds .for brucel- losis control-nV the 1953 budget to match federal funds jn a bill passed last year. v State and federal funds would be used to reimburse owners of reactors, allowing them two- thirds of the difference between beef prices and the appraised value of the animal. Other bills advanced before the House adjourned for the weekend would allow the State Fish and National Toll Highway Proposed As Substitute For Building Of Strategic Roads Clay Program Would Spend Billion WASHINGTON Iff) A national tall highway network was pro- posed today as a substitute for a presidential commission's rec- ommendation that the federal gov- ernment build strategic roads. H. E. Bailey, recently resigned as general manager of the Okla- homa Turnpike Authority, said the government financing plan would be used by "forces of reaction to pass the buck to the federal the next 10 years. It suggested that the federal government paj 25 billions of the cost of a pro posed 27-billion-dollar network o ways through rev.enue bonds float ed by a new highway corporation Clay said gasoline tax revenue over the next 30 years would be more than enough to pay for thi' program. Bailey, instead, called for repeal of the 2-cent-a-gallon federal gas government for responsibility for oline tax. He suggested "tha all classes of highways." In an address prepared for a national road conference sponsored source of revenue be left to the states." He asked that the federal gov by the U S. Chambe'r of Com- ernment sot up a national turn merce, he said that a 1939 report pike authority and provide of the Bureau of Public Roads a year for highway work opposing toll financing had "de- from excise taxes on autos, trucks layed the development of a nation al trunk highway system for l.r years." Gen. Lucius D. Clay, chairman of President Eisenhower's com- mission, told the conference at its opening session yesterday that "toll roads are here to stay" but that he didn't think very much of toll financing. Robert T. Jones Jr., president of the Houston Chronicle, said the Clay committee plan would end any need for further toll roads. The Clav commission called for a total federal-state highway pro- gram of 101 billion dollars over oils, tires and parts. Under Bailey's program, the en tiro <10 000-mile interstate network would be made up of toll roads finnnfod by joint funds from state and federal turnpike authorities Tn sparsely populated areas the federal government would pay the entire construction cost. A toll fee of 1 to 1% cents a mile would be charged to automo biles and 2 to 4 cents a mile to trucks. Proceeds would be usec for maintenance and the retire- ment of bonds issued by the states to finance their part of the sys- tem. to regulate fish- acquired by the and Game director ing in waters state and allow the issuing of licenses to sell skimmed milk and buttermilk. peratures. William Beecher is in charge erf the skating rink and will be orf duty weekdays from 3 to 8 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday schedules will 'be maintained from 1 to 8 p.m. After 8 p.m., the area will be sprayed for skating the following day. Skating at the YMCA pool at Hicks Corners has been good for the past two months and from 200 to 300 persons have enjoyed skating there daily, officials re- ported. County Court Grants Divorces In Two Casss Two divorces have been graft- ed in Bennington County Court. Edna B. Burdick of Pownal won an uncontested divorce from Calvin J. Burdick of Berkshire County, Mass.. on grounds of in- tolerable severity. Luella May Martin was grant- ed a divorce from Donald G. Mar- tin, both of Bennington, also on grounds of intolerable severity. She was given custody of the couple's child and Mr. Martin was ordered to contribute toward its support. must not cease our efforts un- til they are. The situation is deli- cate and we must have both pa tience and determination." Hammarskjold returned here last night from a globe-circling flight to Red China seeking the release of the American airmen and other U. N. personnel held there He indicated he considered his talks with Chou Erflai, Red China's Premier-foreign minister, consti- tuted onlv the first stage of his efforts. The next move is up to the United States after it considers Hammarskjold's report. Hammarskjold reviewed the Pei- pmg talks in a private meeting with Lodge shortly after the sec- retary general landed at Idlewild Airport in a U. S. Army Super Constellation. Hamarskjold also called a news conference for this morning at which he was expected to reveal at least part of what went on dur- ing his Peiping talks. All details have been withheld from ihe public. Hammarskjold and his aides made the following points clear, however, in a series of state- ments 1. Hammarskjold considered the discussions with Chou useful. 2. He felt he had made some progress toward release of the fliers. 3. The primary value of the trip was that it established contacts through which more progress might be made. 4. He felt negotiations can be kept open if all sides show a proper restraint. Here is the wav the secretary general summed it up last right upon his return "My visit to Peipinjj a stage in my effort to 11 American fliers and the othei Nations Com -land person nel still detained. I fael that my talks with Mr. Chow En-lai con- tinue our contacts. The door that has been opened can be kept open given restraint on all sides." This seemed to mean: 1. That Chou had laid down con- ditions, or at least hinted at cori- SEE LODGE (Continued wn Page MONTPELIER first two bills of the session were killed today as the House turn- ed down proposals to shorten the deer hunting day and to broaden the authority of muni- cipalities to exempt new homes from taxes. The deer bill originally propos- ed to shorten the hunting hours during deer season a half hour on each end of the day. The Fish and Game Committee pro- posed an amendment leaving the present deadline at 5 p. m., but allowing hunters to start at a. m., instead of 6 a. m. The measure' had been recommended by the Fish and Game Service as a safety step, since a nation- wide survey show's that most hunting accidents occur in the early morning or late afternoon. The House turned the bill down after arguments that many hunters have only early morn- ing and later afternoon to hunt and that the visibility is, as good John Nash Appointed New Chief of Police In North Bennington NORTH BENNINGTON John Nash, 56, of South Shaftsbury, was appointed Chief of Police for North Bennington to succeed Clayton Benjamin who died Jan. 1. The former New York City policeman was selected from 13 applicants screened in three meetings and inumerable informal discussions of the Board of Trustees. Nash has been a resident o f South Shaftsbury for the four years since his retirement from the New York force. He had served in the city for 26 years._He saw duty for 24 of these years in Harlem, con- sidered the city's toughest district. He also served 2 years on the waterfront. Nash took the oath of office from Chairman of Trustees, Fred- eric Welling, at this morning. He is now on active duty. Trustee Welling expressed h i s great satisfaction with the a p pomtment. "We are confident, he said "that Nash will continue the preventative program develop- ed under Chief Benjamin. The principle job of the policeman will be to maintain the good conditions that now exist m North Benning Democrats Meet Monday to Name Town Candidates The Bennington Democratic Cau- cus will be held Monday night at 8 at Bennington High School. Persons will be nominated for offices to be voted upon at the Town Meeting March 1. As yet, there have been no an- nouncements by Democrats for any of the town offices. Richard Corcoran, chairman of the Bennington Town Democratic Committee, will preside at the cau- at 5 p. m. on some days as it is out a 3 p. m., on others. House Committee Bills Coming To Floor Very Fast MONTPELIER, UP) Commit- tees of the time-conscious House of Representatives, determined-to run off an earlier than June ad- journment, are kicking bills back to the House floor at a record pace. Fifteen measures were reported by House committees Thursday, setting them up automatically for action tomorrow. This is the fast- est pace set by the lower chamber in 11 sessions of the General As- sembly. Ten of the bills were reported The tax exemption reported unfavorable bill by the Ways and Means Committee which split 8 to 7 on the mea- sure. The present law allows towns to vote to exempt from taxes for five years new homes appraised at S5000 or less. Under the Vermont system of with committee approval a s they, four others were okay- ed with proposals  er of bills introduced since the General Assembly opened, 10 days ago. In the 1953 session, it was the irst week in February before the otal went over the 100 mark. The bill changing the law o n appraising, this Would makP emPtions the first of con- .lliarVC p-l-wl ______ homes costing up to eligible for exemption in most communities. The bill would al- exemptions on the of valuation on all first struction cost of new houses, even though their total value was high- er than that amount. The Fish and Game committee refushed to approve a proposition homes, making it possible for 'hat deer hunting stop at p. the owner of a home to m' durinS the regular season ra- get an exemption on the first of its appraised value. ther than at five o'clock. It went along with a proposal cutting a The argument in favor of the half hour off tne starting time each bill was that it would age building, particularly of costlier houses which would add to tax income later, and that it would end ,the present practice of listers appraising all homes at to get the tax exemp- tion benefits. Those opposed to the measure argued that a man who could afford a home did not need a tax exemption, and that the law as it complishes its couraging building by those who can afford only low cost houses. now stands purpose of ac- en- day, moving it up from 6 to OPOSSUM MOVED IN OKLAHOMA CITY E. Jameson Jr., 30, Kansas City, couldn't raise the flaps on his light plane after landing here yesterday. An investigation traced the trouble to a homesteading opossum which was comfortably settled inside the fuselage. The animal had chewed through an electrical wire con- nected to the hydraulic .flaps. Convict's Cat Back in Custody Again Today BOSTON convict's cat, paroled with his master yesterday, was back in custody The 18-month-old Sir Walter Ral- eigh was presented the regulation prison discharge papers at state prison, where he was born. He was fitted out in a neat wooden traveling case. Soon after their release, his owner Frank Peraski was picked up for New Jersey authorities. He was taken to Suffolk County Jail. Since the law does not allow cats in the jail, Sir Walter was placed in custody of Atty. Arthur Brogna of the Back Bay. At the Brogna home, the black and white Sir Walter promptly bolted into a dark closet and re- fused to come out. The situation may be untangled by a Boston Municipal Court judge Tuesday when New Jersey au- thorities are expected here. Irunken driving was one of five ntroduced by Rep. William C. Hill of Hinesburg. It sets up spe- ifications for use of blood tests in riminal prosecutions and increas- s the penalties for conviction. It also sets the penalty for a irst conviction of drunken driving t not Jess than a fine nor more lan or imprisonment for ot more than two years, or both, in each subsequent conviction he person shall be imprisoned rom two months to two years and ned not more than Hill's four other bills also deal motor vehicle regulations. Rep. Charles H. Brown of Bran on introduced the bill to bond for to build the state library ddition. A similar bill was defeat d by one vote in the Senate i n he 1953 session and the request or an addition has also been turn- d down several times in previ- us sessions. Rep. Cornelius F. Reed of Wol- ott sponsored the bill to increase ability insurance on school buses. Bills carrying out recommenda- ons of the Vermont Judicial ouncil were introduced by 1 a w- ers in the House and Senate. One authored by Rep. Loren R. ierce of Woodstock, would give le state supreme court, superior judges and muni-ipal judges the power to make rules governing procedure in their courts. Rep. George Neil of Pittsford proposed a bill to make lobbyists pay a registration fee for each general or special session. The fee would affect lobbyists for this session if passed by both houses. A flat rate for licenses to sell oleomargarine, for retailers and for wholesalers, is proposed as a substitute for the present slid ing scale based on sales. Rep. Wil- fred J. Bisson of Plainfield is the sponsor of the measures. BENNINGTON CLUB SNACKS SUNDAY: 6 to 8 Hosts: John Zync Carl Williams PROVIDENCE, R.I. Iff) The Fire Department rescue squad to- day holds a perfect record on calls from Mrs. Avis Camera three calls, three babies, three girls in three years. The latest call was yesterday. Legal Counsel Backward About Coming Forward Bennington Village Trustees may have to get along without legal counsel this year, that is if a candi- date for the corporation attorney post isn't dug up in a hurry. The Citizens Caucus is only eight days away and aspirants for the post are scarcer than hen's teeth. Incumbent Reuben Levin ha-s announced he will not run for the job. He has served three terms. Last year, Levin also announced he wouldn't run, but was drafted at the caucus, he says. However, he declares his decision is final this time. Perhaps, one of the several can- didates for the Ward 7 trustee post will to be drafted for the job. It may be that the low salary paid to the corporation attorney, which amounts to about per week, isn't enough to attract qualified legal talent. Other candidates yet to announce are Village President Harold G. Griffin, Clerk Hilda Hurley, Col- lector of Taxes Julia Nash and Au- ditors John J. Devito, Joseph Shea and Robert Johnson. Four aspirants have announced for Ward 7 ti usteeship being va- cated by Incumbent Wallace E. Mattison. They are .'Kenneth J. Fleming, Winston W. Lother, Wil- liam J. Burton and Wesley Buzzell. Incumbent Ward 1 Trustee Leon Eldred is unopposed. Treasurer Louis .Sausville will seek another term as will Water Commissioners Alfred Ellett and Arthur Rickert. The final preliminary plans of a proposed Union High School for the Bennington area were present- ed to district directors, high school teachers, and representatives of other groups at a meeting held Thursday evening. Architect John N. Brownrigg Jr., of the firm of Reynolds and Associates in Albany, N. Y., ex- hibited and explained final ink drawings prepared in accordance with directions of school officials and citizens. He told 1he group final study and redrawing of the plans on the reduced scale ordered by the di- rectors had resulted m a reduction in the square footage size of the building and reduced the total con- struction price to Cost of the building had been previously estimated at more than Brownrigg said he will present and discuss 1he final plans with members of the Citizens Commit- tee for Better Schools at a meeting to be held in the County Courthouse building at p. m., Wednesday. Union directors also voted to have a scale model of the struc- ture, similar to one developed and exhibited for the elementary school building program, constructed. It will be built by engineering stu- dents at Cornell University, and will be given a public showing at the February meeting of the Citi- zens Committee. Brownrigg retraced his draw- ings for the building which would have a classroom capacity of 400 pupils, with an additional 100 pu- pils capable of being housed through the convenient addition of two classrooms. Central facilities of the school, such as cafeteria, auditorium, gym and shop areas, would be designed Cor a 500 pupil enrollment. The gym would have permanent bleacher seats to accommodate 800 persons, with seating for 150 1 more spectators possible by add- ing temporary bleachers at the ends of the stands. Browm-jgg told the group the total project price of in- cluded for equipment, in- cluding shop equipment. He said the equipment price was derived by alloting nine per cent of the construction price, which is a practice proved reliable on the basis of experiences of more than schools constructed in New York State in the past five years. Other provisions included in the project price allow for site development, for supervis- ion; for architects and en- inpering fees, and a con- tingency allowance. The building would include a total of 21 recitation and class work rooms, plus central facilities, guidance and administration of- fices, toilets, locker rooms, and other units. Each classroom is designed to hold 28 pupils with possible ex- pansion to a total of 32 or 35 pu- pils. Full explanation of the proposed plans will be offered at the Jan. 19 meeting of the Citizens Commit- tee. NO SNOW SO HAYKIDE AMHERST, Terry Taupier, 19, of Holyoke, was chosen snow queen of the University of Massachusetts W i n fee r Carnival yesterday and then the snow queen and her attendants went on a hayo-ide. No snow. FREE "The Story of Mooseheart, the Child City" and "Moosehaven Home of the Aged." To be shown Sunday, Jan. 16th, 2 P. M., at the General Stark Theatre. The Public is Cordially Invited To .Attend. Ehrich Is Assigned As Counsel for Read Atty. Manfred Ehrich has been assigned as counsel for Richard Read, 18, of Bennington, one of three area youths facing rape charges in Bennington County Court. Superior Judge Albert W. Bar- ney had previously assigned Atty. Eugene Clark to represent Read, but Clark has withdrawn. Read and two companions, Har- vey Pratt, 21, of Bennington, and John Greene, 19, of Shaftsbury, allegedly raped an 18-year-old Bennington girl Dec. 31 in Shafts- bury. A trial date has not been set. 1953 Willys Station Wagon 4x4 1950 Willys Station Wagon 4x4 BOTH IN TOP TO SELL 1947 Mercury, new motor, MANY OTHER NEW AND USED JEEPS GLENN MOTOR CO. 334 PLEASANT DIAL, 3955 Stroffoleno Funeral Services Tomorrow Funeral services for George Edward Strnffoleno of East Main Street, who lost his life in an auto accident on North Bennington Road Wednesday, will be held from the Federated Church, East Arlington, tomorrow morning at 3 o'clock. The Rev. Robert Meale, pastor, will officiate. Entombment will be at Park Lawn Vault. The body will remain at the Walbndge Funeral Home until the time of the funeral. POWERS DELIVERY Now Under NEW MANAGEMENT FBANCIS GRIFFIS 308 North St. DIAL 9718 NEWSPAPF.RRRCHJVE   

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