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Bennington Evening Banner: Wednesday, January 12, 1955 - Page 1

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 12, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER FIFTY-SECOND PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1955 WEATHER: Cloudy, warmer, light snow tonight and Thursday. Aunt Slug Hears That a Good Carpenter is One Who Can Keep a Straight Face While Busy Repairing One of Those Popular Do-lt-Yourself Projects (Banner Barschdorf) MASS OF TWISTED of this car, George Stroffoleno of East Main St., Bennington, was killed when his car smashed head-on into a tree on Route 6 7 A on the Bennington Flati at noon today. A portion of the car, not shown in this picture, ended up about 50 feet from the tree. According to reports Stroffoleno was on his way to Beunington for lunch when the mishap occurred. Witnesses said the rear portion of the car just flew from the body after it crashed into the tree. He was alone at the time of the accident. State police are investigatin g. Lawyers Disagree With Levin; Say Village Manager Article Does Not Require Petitioning Conflicting opinions by Village Atty. Reuben Levin and two other local lawyers were voiced this noon concerning the legality of Bennington Village Trustees in- serting an article in the warning asking a vote on the village man- ager system at the March meet- ing. Levin maintains that Trustees cannot insert an article unless a petition requesting such is pre- sented by voters equal to five per cent of the votal vote cast for gov- ernor in the last election. The other two lawyers, who re- quested their names not be pub- lished, said that Trustees have 'a perfect right to insert any article in the warning. They based their opinion on the Youth Dies In Car Crash; Is Second Fatality MONTPELIER, second highway death of 1955 was recorded at Echo Lake in East Charleston last night when a six-year old boy drowned as the car in which he was riding plunged into the icy waters o: the lake. State Police headquarters here identified the victim as Curtis Mayall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tex Mayall of East Charleston. Three other occupants of the car survived the ill-fated plunge by freemg themselves and swim ming to safety: Curtis was in a car driven by Charles Perrier, a half brother. fact that the only effect of the Another half brother, Wayne Perrier, and Floyd Bowen, an undo, were also in the vehicle. The accident occurred at the outlet of the lake and State Po- lice believe the youngster's body was swept downstream into the Clyde River. Richard Ryan, 18, of North Adams, was Vermont's first high- way fatality. He was killed in an auto crash on Route 346 in North Pownal at 5 a. m., New Year's Day. law is to limit the right of the voters to have a question recon- sidered. The law specifies, they pointed out, ,that any group wishing con- sideration of a question is re- quested to submit a petition with- in 30 days of the previous vote. They further explained that the only time a petition is neces- sary is when the governing body of a municipality does not want to submit an article. In such a case, they said, the group persisting reconsideration of a question would, according to law, have to present a petition. The petition would be prescribed in the manner already pointed out by Village Atty. Levin. A controversial issue in Ben- nington for many years, the manager system was voted out by niru> votes at the meeting last remove tax exemptions on rnotor year. Later, at a special meeting, j vehicles held by automobile deal- Submit New Vehicle Tax Exemption Bill MONTPELIER, bill to it was also voted down by 89 votes, leaving the then Village manager, Paul H. Hermann, with- out a job The majority of the Board of Trustees feels the Village should maintain the manager system This question was discussed briefly at .last week's meeting of the trustees. 33 Measles Cases Reported In County Some 158' cases of measles were diagnosed in the state last week. according to a report issued b y the Vermont Department o f Health. Thirty-three of those cases were in Bennington County. Other diseases diagnosed in the state last week are. mumps, 46; chicken pox, 53; hepatitis infec- tious, 4; tuberculosis, 3; gonorr- hea, 2; whooping cough, 2; undu- lant fever, 1, streptococcal infec- tions, 1; dysentery bacillary, 1 poliomyleistis, 1. The breakdown in Bennington County is as follows: chicken po.x, 6; dysentery bacillary, 1; mumps, 6; tuberculosis, I. ers as stock in trade was intro- duced in the House today by Rep Allen C. Alfred of South Bur- lington. Automobiles owned for per- sonal or business use are exempt- "-1. A similar bill was defeated in ed. the 1953 legislature after a largely attended public hearing. Alfred's bill also changes the law on listing stock in trade so that such stock will be placed in the grand list at its average value during the previous year rather than its value on April 1. .Two Senate bills introduced today would set up health dis- tricts in the state and increase the number of Chittenden County I senators. The health district bill, intro- duced by Sen. Hector Marcoux of Chittenden County, authorizes the Health Commission to estab- lish and control 'health districts lor the of the biennium c. r the second year. me benate membership bill the same as one defeated inn the 1 vvac N. England Firms May Seek Atomic Power Program BOSTON Iff) Yankee Atomic Electric Co., forerunner in New England plans for development and use of atomic energy, intends to seek a place in the govern ment's "power demonstration re- actor program." Central Vermont Public S e r vice Corp. is one of 14 New Eng- land electric companies compris- ing the Yankee Atomic Co. Wil liam Webster, executive vice pres ident of the New England Elec- tric System, is lyesident of Yank- ee Atomic. The plan, by which private in- dustry would join the govern ment in developing and operating experimental nuclear power r e actors, was announced this Week by Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Lewis L. Strauss. A spokesman said Yankee Atom- ic's status is that of the "deliber- ation stage." It has no physical properties. With respect to the AEC plain to bring private resources in the ad- vancement of nuclear energy in he industrial or commercial field, Yankee spokesman said it "does anticipate doing something" about applying before the April 1 dead- inp. The AEC plans to make avail- able to qualified firms special nu- clear materials, waiving its estab- ished charges up to an agreed upon amount. The participating firms would )e required, however, to pay for iEC materials consumed in the irojects and for services perform- d for them by AEC. The com mission said further it has estab- ished "fair prices" it will pay or products purchased from pri- operated reactors. Citizen Asks Garbage Vote Be Included Cites Four Advantages A Bennington citizen spoke out today in favor of a municipal garbage collection for the Village. Sam A. Patterson of Pleasant street told the Banner this morn- ing he would like to see such an article included in the warning for the March meeting. He maintained that voters should at least be given a chance to vote on a proposed municipal garbage collection article. The local man's comments were made in connection with a Proctor Flier Bails Out In Plane Crash 71 Persons Safe SEWART AIR FORCE BASE, Tenn. dfl Engine blazes in two C119 Flying Boxcars marred a paratrooper airlift to Alaska yes- terday with a flaming crash here and a forced landing in Montana. A total of 68 paratroopers and three airmen parachuted to safety from the two planes, but two crew- men of the plane which crashed presumably the pilot and copilot still were missing today as Air Force investigators poked through the smoking wreckage. controversy now existing be- tween Paul Jepson, superintend- ent of the Town dumping grounds, and some eight or nine Ehrich, counsel for bility of inserting such an article in the warning with five mem- Names of the missing men were .iot released. Thirty five airborne infantry- men and three crewmen jumped dscused the possT shortly after the twin-engine craft bets of the Village Board of Trustees, Monday night. Atty. Ehrich reported at that time that the refuse collectors were not adhering to a bargain between them and Jepson. An agreement between Jepson and the collectors was made sev- eral weeks ago that the collectors would partition the dump bodies of their trucks and separately dump garbage and trash. Reason for separating garbage from trash was that, under fed- eral law, swine may not be mar- keted if they are fed uncooked jarbage. Jepson, who raises hogs at the dump, cannot feed his hogs if garbage and trash are mixed together at the dump, because the garbage cannot be cooked. Trustees have expressed the feeling that the matter is strict' ly a personal problem between smoke. the three crewmen who parachuted to safety is'a New Eng- lander, Frank 'Popovics, 27, of Proctor, Vt., the radio operator. Only hours earlier, 33 paratroop- ers used their chutes when an en- gine caught fire on their plane near Aerial Activity Heightens As Costa Rica'Invasion' Continues; Invaders Capture Two Ports Republican Leaders Defend Vice President Nixon In Face Of Democratic Criticism Johnson of Sewart AFB then guided the plane to the Miles City airport without incident. The two Boxcars were part of a flight of 80 ferrying air- borne troops from Ft. Campbell, Ky., to Alaska for Operation Snow- bird, a winter exercise. Paratroop ers involved in both jumps were members of the 503rd Airborne In- fantry Regiment. The crash scene here was about three miles from the base. Wit- nesses said the plane spun nose first into the earth, then burst into "a great mushroom of fire and Jepson and the collectors and they should not enter into it. Trustees did say, however, they would insert an article in the warning if a petition bearing the names of four per cent of the total vote cast in the last gen- eral election was presented to them. Patterson contends that Trus- tees should put the article in the warning anyway. "If the people don't want a municipal garbage he pointed out, "they will vote it down." He cited several advantages of a municipal collection. One was that collections would have to be made at each house in the Vil- lage, whereas now collections are made only for those families which employ private collectors. He also pointed out that many people dump their garbage into the Walloomsac River, thus pol- luting the stream. A third advantage, he said, would be the decrease in cost of collections. A cleaner Village was a fourth advantage listed by Pat- terson. Jepson Mas maintained that he could administer a municipal garbage collection for less than Based on the present number of Village water ac- counts, Trustees estimate that pnvate collections now beincr made total Second Lt. James Reynolds. Melbourne, Fla., platoon leader of the paratroopers aboard, said his men thought it was still when the crew chief ordered them to prepare to jump. Reynolds said the men followed briefing instructions exactly and 30 seconds later the passenger com partment was empty. "I don't know what happened to the pilot, but he did a good job. He gave us all the time we need- ed The troopers bailed out at feet and came down in near- freezing weather over an area more than three miles across. Most landed on the base. One man, Pfc. Richard L. Dalton, Bcnton Harbor, Mich., was hospitalized overnight with minor injuries. The troopers in Montana flut- tered over a three-mile area, also, landing on both sides of the Yel- lowstone River. They jumped from a height of about 600 feet. The big Boxcars have been tak- ing off at 30-minute intervals from here since 6 a.m. Monday with the last flights clearing early today. WASHINGTON Republi- can high command again defended Vice President Nixon against Dem- ocratic criticism today, issuing a statement in his praise signed by four GOP Midwestern state chair- men. "We believe we speak for the vast majority of Americans who resent below-the-belt attacks cur- rently being made upon the vice the statement said. "People in general are getting pretty sick of these 'pitiful cries of 'smear' which lack any trace of proof." The statement, distributed by the GOP National Committee, bore the names of these four state party chairmen: Ray C. Bliss, Ohio; Al- vin C. Cast, Indiana; Morton H. Hollingsworth, Illinois; and Don C. Pierson, Iowa. All four were among the guests at a stag dinner given by President Eisenhower at the White House Monday night. Many Democrats have criticized the vice president, the most active GOP campaigner in the weeks be- fore the November elections, on the ground that he sought to in- dict Democrats generally for a softness toward communism. Nixon has declined to comment on this criticism. Eisenhower praised Nixon's ef- forts during the campaign, and GOP National Chairman Leonard W. Hall said in a statement Mon- day night there was in progress "a highly organized campaign to besmirch" the vice president. In what looked like a campaign by the GOP to counter the criti- cism, the four state chairmen said they wanted to thank Nixon pub- licly for his service to the party and the American people in the campaign. "Needless to say, the vice presi- dent went before the American people in the 1954 campaign with facts about the destructive effects of left-wing influence in govern- which were distilled a year and a half of cleaning up after a party which ran its reckless course for nearly a generation, "the state chairmaen's statement said. "The Democrats engaged in these attacks would better serve their country if they gave more time and attention to supporting President Eisenhower's legislative program and less to assaulting the character of the vice president." Odds GREATLY REDUCED The Re'st of This Week CORNER CRAFT SHOP 'Foreign-Sounding Voice' Threatens McCarthy WASHINGTON Iff) Sen. Mc- Carthy (R-Wis) returned from an undisclosed mission yesterday and learned his next-door neighbor had reported a telephone warning that the senator would be "blown up." A police guard was stationed near the McCarthy home, one of a row of houses joined together. The neighbor, Mrs. George W Ennis, told newsmen a "man witt a foreign-sounding voice" called and told her, "We want you to va- cate the premises. We're going to blow up Sen. Joe McCarthy." McCarthy said he crackpot" made the call. The senator said he left Washing ton Sunday in connection with the work of the Senate investigations joint- subcommittee but the .trip proved a "b'ank run." He did not say ifc DOIll OT tenden County. It decreases uny number of Acldison County sena- tors from two to one pncl it- creases those from ChitfoiWi Bounty from four to five move for the chingc ic based on the 19jQ census. and IKE TO MEET LONDON The Evening News reported today that Presi- dent Eisenhower and Prime Min- ister Churchill may meet in Lon- don next month to coordinate American and Common wealth policies towards the Communist 1 world. BUZZELL IS CANDIDATE FOR 7 Wesley Buzzell, local contrac- tor, of 826 Gage Street'announced this noon that he would seek elec- tion as Village Trustee from Ward 7. Two other candidates, William Burton and Kenneth Flemming have already announced for the position. Incumbent Trustee Wal- lace E. Mattisonlwill not seek re- election. VPSC Seeks Law Giving Refund Jurisdiction Press Bureau) MONTPELIER The Public Service Commission has recom- mended legislation giving the public refunds of amounts paid between the time the PSC lowers utility rates and termination of the proceedings. Such a move would provide for refunds to the public similar to rights for special levies held by the companies in cases where higher rates have been granted by the Commission. Under an Act of the 1951 Leg- islature, the company to which increased rates are granted is allowed to! mafce up by a special levy any amounts it would have earned had the rates gone into effect as soon as filed rather than after final determination. The measure, proposed by the PSC in its biennial report, would guarantee the same rights to the public in case of a PSC order 'for lower rates. It was one of four legislative oroposals released by the PSC. The Commission suggested that he Legislature study the "fast ;rowing" television industry with an eye toward creating some regulatory agency. The report noted that the Attorney General had given an opinion that tele- vision was beyond the jurisdic- tion of the PSC. Citing 17 deaths incurred in ac- cidents at railroad grade cross- ings, the Commission suggested legislative authorization for local surveys of safeguards at rail crossings. An appropriation to assist municipalities to determine the need for additional warning devices was also suggested. Invited Witnesses Fail To Appear For Killer's Death HUNTSVILLE, Tex. young convicted killer who had invited to his execution the detectives who caught him, the men who prosecut- ed him and the jurors who tried him died early today in the elec- tric chair. None of those he had invited were there. He did not even bother to read a statement he had writ- ten questioning the death sentence Donald Hawkins Brown, 24, was brought into the state prison death chamber at 12.02 a.m. while out- side the prison walls his young wife, mother of two children, and 'lis mother waited. He surveyed the chamber, a half smile on his face, and remarked: "I don't see the district attorney Dr any of the prosecutors here." Then he was strapped in the death chair. The first electric charge struck him at a.m. and he was pronounced dead two minutes later. As he stepped to the chair, he handed newsman Don Reid, of Huntsville. a "prepared state- ment" which he had said earlier he planned to read before his exe- cution. "Capital punishment has become the great issue here where I have lived among the the note said. It said if the death sen- tence was to be feared by crimi- nals and the public and was to be "deterrent to crime" that the public and prosecutors "should 'be here." The note questioned the wisdom )f the death sentence and said it 'made martyrs of these men and placed at the feet of psychopaths an adventure to be desired." Brown's plea for clemency was turned down by the parole board yesterday. Newsman Reid, who has report- ed hundreds of executions, said Brown, after receiving the news, did not follow the death row tra- dition of remorse and the brave front but asked that Dist. Atty. Study Committee Report to Cite Area Resources MONTPELIER, head of the New England-New York Inter-Agency Committee said here last night the completed report of his committee point out where natural resources could be developed in the area, but not who would do the job. Col. Benjamin B. Talley of New York City, committee chairman, was in Montpelier to preside at a public hearing to be held on the committee's report today. Members of the committee which has made an exhaustive study of natural resources in lake and river basin areas in the seven-state region met with Ver- mont state officials and business officials for a preliminary discus- sion last night. President Eisenhower is sched- uled to receive the finished report comprising 41 volumes in June of this year. Included will be com- ments of the governors of the participating states. j A committee spokesman said copies of the report would bo available to industry, education and the general public at that time. i The report itself covers many items of interest to residents of Vermont. It discusses navigation'develop- ment on Lake Champlam, but at present considers actual develop- ment of the Lake Champlain cut- off economically unfeasible at this time. The committee qualified this section of the report by stating that the 'deepening of the St Lawrence waterway may- in time alter these findings Services Held For Mrs. Fanny Meagher Final tribute was accorded n, Old Benmngton's first citizens and prominent Episcopalian, at services attended by many mourn- ers at St. Peter's Church Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Meagher died Saturday night at her home on Monument avenue at the age of 84. She was the widow of Judge William J. Meagher and mother of the late Vermont Supreme Court Justice Samuel H. Blackmer. Officiating at the funeral were .Bishop Vedder Van Dyck of t h e Vermont Episcopal Diocese and the Rev. Canon Norman Godfrey, rector of St. Peter's Church. Also present was the Rev. Norman P. Dare of Brooklyn, Conn., former rector of St. Peter's Church. The pallbearers were Justice James S. Holden, Waldo C. Hoi- den, Alexander B. R. Drysdale.Leo Miller, Franklin P. Jones and Ed- ward Ransom. The Rev. Canon Godfrey officia- ted at the commitment. Burial was in the family lot "in Old Ben- nington Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family re- quested that giifts in her memory be made to the Rock Point School in Burlington, Vt. Among those from out of town at the service was Mrs. Ella Ab- ercpmbie of Greenfield, Mass, Seventeen Are Feared Dead In Air Crash BURLINGTON, Ky. least 17 persons were reported to have been killed today when two planes collided over the Greater Cincin- nati Airport near here. The airport is 12 miles southwest-of Cincinnati. "I doubt if there are survivors from either John Hedrick, operator of a flying service, told newsmen after a flight over the area. He said he saw bodies lying over a 200 yard area. It was understood the TWA plane had 12 passengers and a crew of three, while the other ship had two persons aboard. Information from TWA head- quarters here was not available immediately. Roy Gannett, Hebron, Ky., fire- man, said the planes fell about two miles apart. He said wreckage was strewn about for many yards, and that both planes burned. Iledrick's information was the same as that given by Gannett. He said only the tail assemblies were visible from his plane. "We circled it two or three Hedricfc told a reporter. "There's very little left of it. Wreckage is still smoldering." SAN JOSE, Costa Rica air raider described as "a Ven- ezuelan pursuit plane which came from Nicaragua" machinegunned ySan Jose today and then was shot down by antiaircraft Civil Guard announced. The raider, which looked like the American-built P47 Thunderbolt of World War n vintage, buzzed the downtown area of this .capital city and loosed machinegun bursts at a residential sector. This came as government troops battled in the north to clear a rebel band from, the Villa Quesada area, about mid- way between San Jose and the Costa Rican-Nicaragua frontier. Three bursts were aimed into the section surrounding the Costa Rican White House, the home of President Jose Figueres. The plane was climbing rapidly as it passed the San Jose Airport control tower. A lumbering DCS of the Lacsa Airlines, armed with machineguns in its side doors, took off in pursuit. A Civil Guard communique said the raide.r was shot down by anti- aircraft artillery and fell in a river called Los Ahogados (The Drowned) near Liberia, a town of about 100 miles northwest of San Jose. Though the plane approached San Jose from the south, the com- mand said it came from a Nicara- guan airfield. "The command recommends that the inhabitants remain at home and keep it said, "be- cause the antiaircraft defenders will give a good account of attack- ing planes, knocking them down just as was done in Liberia." (Costa Rica's delegate to the U.N. was informed from San Jose tli at invading forces captured two small port cities on the Pacific Coast. The delegate, Ambassador Benjamin Nunez, identified the cities as Puerto Soley, near the Nicaraguan border, and Puerto Cortez, in the southern part of Costa Rica. He said also invading planes had machine gunned Turri- alba and Cartago.) State Attempts To Refund Auto Fines POCATELLO, Idaho [Si Police here are asking motorists who paid fines or forfeited bonds because they didn't have their 1955 license plates on time to please come take their money back. Gov. Robert E. Smylie requested last Saturday that arrests of mo- torists who missed the Jan. 1 dead- line be stopped until Jan. 20. The only trouble is that Smylie, who took office Jan. 3, made his request a week after the deadline. In that time, a lot of tickets had already been handed out. The mayor of Boise, Idaho's cap- ital city, has openly defied Smylie and ordered police to continue mak- ing arrests. But over most of the state, law officials are going along with the request, albeit reluctantly. Pocatello is the only city to start refunding fines already levied. It announced the move Monday, but only a handful of refund-due mo- torists showed up to collect their money yesterday. Lumberman To Fill Legislative Vacancy (Vermont Press Bureau) MONTPELIER N. Warren Fellows, 67, a lumber mill operat- or and former insurance man, lias been named to the legislature by Governor Joseph B. Johnson. Fellows was appointed repre- sentative from Pittsfield to fill a vacancy created by the death of Winn G. Chamberlain. The new representative came to Pittsfield from New York in 1938 to engage in farming and .umbering. He was born in Ip- swich, Mass. N.H. Police Seize Area Youth On Robbery Charge An 18-year-old Woodford youth and his companion from Californ- ia were arrested Tuesday by Keene N. H., police and have been re- turned to Vermont to face charges of grand larceny. Albert E. Davis of Woodford Road, and George W. Prouty Jr. 37. of Collax, Calif., were charged with being fugitives from justice from the state, of Vermont and waived extradition when arraign- ed before Judge Arthur Olson in Keene Municipal Court. Tpr. Lawrence H. Cook, State Police, stationed at Wilmington, said the two men broke into and looted the Esso filling station own- ed by Merrill K. Green Tuesday morning in Wilmington. Tpr. Cook, who discovered the break, said the following items were stolen: two new chain saws, one valued at and the other at a new tire worth and a rear view mirror. The goods have been recovered. Entrance had been gained b y smashing a pane of glass in a door and reaching in and releas- ing the lock, Tpr. Cook said. Police in Keene, checking cars, stopped the pair and became sus- picious when they saw the new chain saws and tire. The Keene of- ficers reported that the two men admitted the break and that the loot talliei? with the list given by Green. The men were driving a California registered car when they were apprehended. Arraigned before Judge Olson, Prouty was also charged with carrying a loaded pistol in his car. He was given a three-months' suspended sentence in the House of Correction and agreed to waive extradition on the other charge. CHARLESTON, Vt. old C'j-tis Mayall drowned last night when a car in which he was riding skidded on an icy road and plunged into Echo Lake. Three adults swam to safety. Bee the 'Buy ctf the Week" On Display at FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BENNINGTON H. GREENBERG SON 321 Main St. Dial 8202   

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