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Bennington Evening Banner Newspaper Archive: January 11, 1955 - Page 1

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Publication: Bennington Evening Banner

Location: Bennington, Vermont

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 11, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTQN EVENING BANNER FIFTY-SECOND PKICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1955 WEATHER: Fair, little change in temperature tonight, Wednesday Uncle Louie Says He's Found Out That Just About the Time You Think You Can Make Both Ends Meet, Somebody Comes Along and Moves the Ends. HARD WAY TO MAKE A Edward Mumford and his mount, Master Bidar, go down in a spectacular spill at the last jump in Russell Selling hurdle Race at Windsor, England, last Friday. A stretcher against rail in background is ready for just such an emergency but it wasn't needed. Neither man nor beaat was injured. Lefevre Is Head Of HouseWays Means Committee; Bloomer And NiquetteAre On Judiciary Howe, Buckley Bills Among 74 Before Assembly Seventy-four bills were introduced into House and Senate today, marking what i s probably the first time in history that the General Assembly has completed its organization with such a stockpile of legislation to down to. The draftsmen's office staff 'has been at work for five weeks pre- paring the 55 House bills and 13 Senate measures which were i n troduced after announcement of committee assignments today, In 1953, it was Jan. 15 before sny bills were introduced, and only six ap- peared that day. The- early reparation of bills this year is'part of the drive to cut the increasing length of legislative sessions. The first bills in the two houses called for increases in unomploy- MONTPELIER W) Senate Democrats carried off four com- mittee chairmanships today as key assignments in both the House Senate ran pretty much to form. Veteran Sen. Asa S. Bloomer of Rutland county, defeated coalition-candidate for president pro-tern, man of was reappomted chair- the powerful Judiciary committee and Sen. Phillip A. Angell named The of Orange county vice chairman. Judiciary post in the House went to Democrat Russell c. N. Niquette ot Winooski, an- other veteran lawmaker. His vice chairman is sophomore Rep. William C. Hill of Hinesburg. The biggest question mark in each chamber was the judiciary committee posts. For the most part, veteran lawmakers were assigned to the key chairmanships in the two chambers. Rep. Reid Lefevre of Man- ment and workmen's compensa tion benefits. Rep. Cornelius O Opposed To Doe Season; Discuss Sheep, Rabbits Members of the Bennington Rod and Gun Club voted -two-tc- one to oppose a doe season of any type held during In the a regular meeting Odd Fellows Hall, Monday After a lengthy discussion of the pros and cons of an antlerless deer season, club members voted to oppose such a season by a 23-9 margin Guests present at the meeting voted 3 to 1 in opposi- tion to an antlerless deer season. Opposition to the proposed ant- lerless season stemmed from reports by Jesse Watson that deer kills in New Massachusetts, where doe sea- sons are allowed, are declining and a report 'by Ray a annually, Crosier that substantial de- crease in deer kills was experi- Means commit- of Appro- committee passed the chairman 1949 but in noxt two sessions and of the was by- given the General committee Gay ranking member of the A p propriations group last session. Sen Guy H. Cleveland of Wind- sor and Sen. Hugh A. Agnew of Windham were named chairmen of the appropriations and finance committees respectively in the up- per chamber. The Senate prrcsi- dent pro-tcm, Sen. Carleton G Howe of Bennington county, is vice chairman of the appropria tions group. Former House Speaker Harold J. Slacey of Windsor county is the second tanking member of the Senate finance group, which .is ing Ways and Granai of Barre City sponsored the ,Rep- Olin D' Gay of Cav' measure to lengthen the period for 1 ls unemployment compensation ben- Prlat'ons. efits from 20- to 26 weeks, raise wa the range of maximum total ben- efits from to and give an additional benefit of a. week for each dependent child under 18. The workmen's compensation bjll was introduced by Son. T. Garry Buckley of Bennington coun- ty. It raises the maximum total death benefits from to the range of weekly death bene fits from to the range of total disability benefits the same amount; the total amount payable for an accident resulting in pcrnanent total disability from to SH100; and the maximum benefits for partial disability frpm to It removes fiom the law a provision for extra for each dependent child under 21 in total disability cases Buckley also sponsored a mea- sure to raise maximum Old Age Assistance grants tiom to a month and to allow a husband and wife, both receiving Old Age Assistance, a month. Sen. Fred B. Crawford of O r leans County introduced three bills, one providing for election oi the Public Service Commission by popular vote, a second setting; up I a presidential preference primary j at town the third appropriating for recrea- tional development at Jay Peak State Park. The first two, the PSC election and the presidential preference primary, introduced in the 1953 session by Crawford. The former calls Cor election of one member of the commission every two years at the primary and gen- eral elections for a period of six years, and provides that the ECOV- ernor biennially designate the chairman. The latter provides for a vote at town meeting to show Chester in his fifth session, will enced -m Vermont after the 1921 head the all important tax writ- doe season. Crosier also said that more hunters would be killed if a doe season were allowed. Club President Albert Jones re- ported the organizations interest- comparable to the House ways and means committee. Sen E. Frank Branon of Frank- lin county, a coalition leader and defeated candidate for governor in 1954, was named chairman of the committee on conservation and development, a post he held two years Democrat Chester C. Martel of Grand Isle was re- named chairman of the committee on state and court expenses. ed in doe season include the Grange, State Farm Bureau and the Forest and Land Taxation department. John Campbell reported that the State Farm Bureau is recom- mending regulatory powers for the Fish and Game Commission, and a request for more adequate payments for deer damages. After the vote, George Plumb stated the action of the fcdcra- Proposed Village Budget To Up Taxes 42 n Rate Down Three Cents tion was in favor ol regulatory tllat powers for the commission ex- cept on deer. During the meeting, a report that the Richfield Dam project has been, dedicated anJ opened was read from the Fish and Game department. The new 165- acre lake is expected to providfe waters for state new fishing' sportsmen. Another report listed the Fish and Game department's recom- mendations for the 1955 General Assembly as including- an antler- loss deer season in "defined A donation of to help sup- port the teachers' summer work- ;pi-ved in the House but never be- fu. e in the Senate won chairman- See HOWE, 'Continued BUCKLEY Page Two) Odds GREATLY REDUCED The Best of This Week CORNER CRAFT SHOP Two other Democrats who have j shop program was vqted by the club Club emblems are expected ___ ......_ _____ ___ to be available at the next meet They are Sens. Hector T. ing of the organization. A discussion on the possibilities of the club raising-and stocking mountain sheep and -jackrabbits was also held. Frank Thompson has, offered the use of his pens for caring for the animals. Marcoux and Frank R O'Brien, both of Chittenden county. Marcoux will head the public health committee and O'Brien is chairman of the fish and game group. Sen Graham S. Newell of Cal- edonia county was named chair- man of the Senate education com- mittee. Other chairmen in the Senate are: Sen. Ralph E. Stafford of Rut- land, agriculture; Fred C. Brown of Orleans, banking: George H. Ash of Addison, highway traffic; Harold Brown of Rutland, in Directed Verdict Ends Damage Suit Superior Judge Albert W. Bar ney, at today in Benning ton County Coiirt. directed a ver A. f TVII i flct for My les Welch, local con trad or and defendant m a negh Rural School Tax Rate Set at 60-Cent Road Tax Taxpayers in both the Town and the Village of Bennington faced increased tax bills in the coming year if tentative budget requests presented Monday eve- ning are carried out. A 12-cent tax increase for Town taxpayers and a 53-cent tax increase for Village taxpayers are the mini- mum advances foreseen. A possibility of tax increases amounting to a maximum of 8] cents to Town taxpayers and to Village taxpayers were estimated by the representatives of five governmental units par- ticipating in the third annual joint budget meeting held in the Selectmen's offices. All of the five units, with the exception of the Town govern- ment, foresaw need for increased operating funds and mandatory tax bill increases. Selectmen offered a tax rate of 54, down three cents fromi the 1954 rate, as their budget base for the coming year. They said a reduction in the Town's debt, in the costs of elections this year and in bridge expenses would al- low the tax cuts. Increases in ex- penditures for poor relief, Town buildings, Town offices and out- side fires would be offset by the savings they have in mind. The Town government tax would be with an addition- al tax of 24 cents necessary for appropriated articles to cover the libraries, Memorial Day, Cham- ber of Commerce, community nurse and flood control sinking fund. Selectmen said their budget would ask for a total of 500 to be raised through taxa- tion for Town expenses, plus to be raised through taxes for appropriated items. RURAi SCHOOL TAX Town residents will be asked to increase the Rural' Schools, Inc., tax rate this year to with a possibility of another 10- cent tax increase if a building program at the Beech Street School is approved in the coming year. The 1954 rate was Prudential Committee Chairman Richard B. Leake -III outlined the district's tentative budget He said enrollment increases in the Rural area will necessitate hiring an ad- ditional teacher and the purchase of additional supplies and equip- ment. Other increased expenses will result from salary raises for teachers, and increases in the cost of heat and insurance. UNION HIGH SCHOOL Union High School Director Leonard J. Black presented his unit's budget for 1hc coming year, fi Union School program is approved in March, a tax rate of 62-cents will be neces- sary in the coming year. If disap- proved a tax of three-cents is anticipated. During the past year, the "dis- trict has operated on a three-cent tax rate. Black said last year's budget was based on an expenditure of while the 1955 budget, if the Union School is approved, will total 075 31 Of this amount, would pay interest on money bor- rowed to support the new building program and would be spent for bond retirement. HIGHWAY AND OAA In addition to these tax charges, Town voters will be asked ap- prove a 60-cent Town Highway tax, and must pay a 00 State Old Age Assistance tax. Conferees stressed that their bud- get figures were only tentative and could be raised or lowered before the annual meetings of each unit are held. A breakdown of the combined charges in a Town taxpayers' bill Town Rural Schools Union High School 62 Town Highway 60 cents; OAA tax All figures are based on gross amnunts to be raised by taxation and are estimated on 1954's Grand List for each unit. stitutions: Fred B. Crawford of suit brought by Pascha OrL ans, military affairs; Ange'j of Orange, municipal tions: Mildred C Havden oi ington .social welfare- House crmirmansh u o.it a b follows: Rep. Lloyd R. Chaffee of Enos- burg, agriculture; Charles Tay lor of Bradford, banking and cor- poeations; Samuel Parsons of Hub- bardton, conservation and devel opment; Robert A. Wiley of Greensboro, education; T. Harden Nelson of Pawlet, fish and game; See Lefevre. Ori Page Twol ullo Zuilo was suing Welch tor bacK injuries suffered by tho former in an accident which tuok place on the job in September. According to the plaintiff's at- torney, Reuben Levin, Zullo suf- fered the injury when a piece of staging toppled on him, throwing him into some concrete blocks. The plaintiff sought a settlement. Attorney for the defense was Manfred Ehrich. The trial con- vened yesterday at 2 p. m. The court allowed the plaintiff exceptions appeal, NINE KILLED Rural Schools To Delay Vote On Any New Construction Until After Union High Has Meeting Voter's in Bennington's Rural Schols, Inc. District will not be asked to pass judgement on a build- ng program for that district until after a vote has been held on a proposed Union High School build- ng program' on March 29. Prudential Co'mmittee members, in a split decision, decided Monday evening to wait until voters have expressed themselves on the Union building plan so that the Rural dis- trict may be better informed of its needs. Board Chairman Richard- B. Leake HI cast the deciding ballot to postpone presentation of the Rur- al school Mrs. Harriet Davis voted for postponement and Everett Lillie voted for immediate action on the plans. Leake said he feared the dis- Lrict would be making a "grave mistake" to vote now on a two-room addition to the Beech Street School when the district may need more classrooms after the Union build- ing plan has been considered In agreement with Mrs. Davis, Leake pointed out that if the Union school is approved, the Rural dis- trict will need only two additional classrooms, but if the Union plan is turned aside, the Rural area will be in need of from four to eight classrooms. He said the dis- trict does not know what it will heed until after the Union district has voted. Board member Lillie urged pre- sentation of the two-room addition to the Beech Street School within the next 30 days. He said delaying until after the Union school vote would moan that a Rural building program, even if approved soon after the Union meeting, would not be ready for occupancy until the first of next year. "We have a responsibility to our own district's elementary needs Lillie said, "and I cannot agree to postpone such action." Leake, however, said he too real- ized the responsibility of the Pru- dential to solve its own problems promptly but stated he did not believe a proper solution could be reached by the Rural dis- trict until it knew how many class- rooms it actually was going to need in the coming years. Supt. Leon E. Wagner also sup- t ported an immediate vote on the two-classroom addition, pointing out that these classrooms are need- ed now; that anything built on the Beech Street School location "would not be a wasted and that a future building project for Rural voters will always, be open at the Town Farm site. Wagner agreed with Leake that if the Union plan is turned down, the Rural district will have great- ly increased building needs and may possibly have to construct a buildjng which will enable the dis- trict to educate its ninth grade pupils as well as its seventh and eighth graders. Committee members voted to support a two-classroom addition to the Beech Street School to meet the disk-let's immediate needs if the Union building program is ap- proved. If it is defeated, they will give further consideration to a fbur- or-more classroom building at the Town Farm site. Either plan would be presented to Rural voters immediately after the Union High School vote March 29- OKLAHOMA CITY per- sons were killed in Oklahoma high- way accidents last night and yes- terday as snow, rain and fog turned roads into treacherous death traps. B. P. O. ELKS REGULAR MEETING TONIGHT ROAST BEEF SUPPER After Meeting __ Rep. Prouty Calls Postal Route Row Very Confusing U. S. Rep. Winston L. Prouty CR. Vt.) today told Bennington citizens the role ho played in the discharge of a postal department employe here and the' appoint- ment of two other men to rural carrier routes Prouty, in a letter to The Ban- ner amplifying a telegram he had sent last week, termed it a "con- fusing situation" and offered an explanation substantially in agree- ment with the explanation provid- ed Monday by Town GOP Chair- man Roy C. Denley. Focal point of the situation is the discharge, effective this Sa- turday, of rural route carrier, Charles W. Rounds of Pownal; the temporary appointment of Merton Cross of Bennington to Route 1; and the permanent ap- pointment of Roger White of Ben- nington to Route 2. Proutyjs explanation follows: To say the least, this is a con- fusing situation, but'l shall en- deavor to explain how pointments were handled. In July Of 1954 the Post Office Department first advised me of a vacancy in the rural carrier force at Bennington and asked me to name a temporary carrier to route 2 because of the retirement of Clarence Morse. As is my custom, i asked the Republican Town Committee to recommend someone and in Au- gust Merton Cross was endorsed for the temporary position. He was to act until the Department could determine the feasibility of consolidating the routes at Benn- ington. This is standard practice and one which is followed by the Department in every vacancy. j In November of last year the Department decided that consoli- dation was not advisable and ask- ed for my recommendations for a permanent carrier. I again con- sulted the Town Committee which Cross. Later I was ad- vised by the Department that Cross did not have status and therefore was not, eheible ofr the ap- pointment without first compet- ing in a Civil Service examina- tion. At this time, I was advised that Roger White, whom I had, in t he meantime, recommended for the temporary position on route 1, was a classified Civil Service employee with status and as such was eligible for the perm- anent appointment on route 2. The" Town Committee was polled and recommended the permanent appointment of Roger White as rural carrier on route 2. Also in November the Post Of- fice advised me of a vacancy on route 1 by reason of ment of Fred Austin. Roger White was recommended by the Town Committee for the temporary carrier's position. However, be- fore the appointment could go through and almost simultaneously the events with respect to route Buckley Compensation Measure Is First Bill To Come Before Senate A bill proposed by T. Garry Buckley, B e n n i n g ton County freshman senator, which calls for increased workmen's compensa- tion benefits, will be the first piece of legislation read, in the Senate. Sen. Buckley's bill would in- crease maximum payments from to weekly and the mini- mum from to The local senator's bill has been tabbed as" S-l, first order of the Senate. Sen. Buckley also submit- ted four other bills. Says Municipal Collection Of Garbage Cheaper Bennington Village taxpayers may be asked to vote on a special articleLat the March meeting which' would call for a municipal garbage collection. Atty. Manfred Ehrich, counsel for Paul Jepson, superintendent of the town dumping grounds, met with five members of the Board of Village Trustees last night. Ehrich complained that an agree- ment made a few weeks ago be- tween Jepson and refuse collectors that the collectors would separate garbage from rubbish is not be- ing adhered to by the collectors. "The housewives are cooperat- the attorney said, "but the collectors are not dumping the re- fuse into the place designated by Jepson." According to the agreement, the collectors were to have par- titioned off the dump bodies of their trucks, dne part for garbage and one part for rubbish. Jepson said this portion of the bargain was done, but collectors are not-dumping the garbage at the ramp constructed by Jepson. "For this Ehrich point- ed out, "I am suggesting that Trustees consider a municipal garbage collection." If a municipal garbage collec- tion should be adopted it would be mandatory for garbage to be See KEP. PROUTY (Continued on Page No Trial Date Set For Case of Trio On Rape Charges A date for the jury trial of three area youths who allegedly raped an 18-year-old Bennington girl on Dec. 31 is pending. The trio, Richard Read, 18, -and Harvey Pratt, 21, of Bennington, and John Greene, 19, of Shafts- bury, formally entered pleas of not guilty to the charges before Superior Judge Albert W. Bar- ney yesterday afternoon in Benn- ington County Court. A trial date is pending due to the heavy schedule of the court. Also, Pratt has asked for Atty. William Sennctt to serve as his counsel, but Scnnett has several other committments and will not be able to take the case until sometime in February. County Court Clerk George H. Plumb instructed the court that there would be an available date for trial during the week of Jan. 24. However, that week conflicts with Sonnett's c o m m f Umentsj Atty. Victor Agostini, who is rep- rese'nting Greene, also requested that the trial date be continued for several weeks. He pointed out that a case of this type calls for extensive study. Judge Barney has yet to assign counsel for Read. Atty. William Themelis of Bennington had rep- resented Read when the tiio was arraigned Saturday before Judge John B. Harte in Municipal Court. Atty. Agostini had entered his appearance for Pratt at that Both the attorneys have with- drawn their appearance for the two youths. Clerk Plumb set bail Saturday for the three youths. Read was re- leased on bail of furnished by his mother, Mrs. Dorothy Read. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Greene served as surety for Green's bail of Pratt, unable to raise bail, was lodged in Bennington County jail. Judge Barney continued the bail y ester day. Re-arraignment in County Court was necessary be- cause a felony cannot be tried in Municipal Court. Pleas on felonies can be heard, however. See SAYS MUNICIPAL (Continued On Page Five) Water Commissioners To Re-Election Two incumbent Village water commissioners announced this morning that they would seek re- election to the Board. Arthur Ricliert of Ward 4 and Alfred Ellett of Ward 2 will seek re-nomination to their respective posts at the Citizen's Caucus Jan. 22. Rickert will be aspiring to his fourth term. Ellett has been a member of the Water Board for several years. The former'previously has serv- ed as overseer of the poor and as Town Selectman. The Water Board terms are for three years. Two Cars Damaged In Minor Collision Two vehicles sustained minor damages when they were involved in a collision at the intersection of Union and Silver streets, Monday afternoon, Village Police reported today. Police said the car owned and operated by Charles Chambers of 115 Fairview Terrace sustained damage to its right bumper and fender when it was in collision with a car operated by Albert S. Edson of 203 Grandview St. The accident occurred at p. m., police said, as the Edson vehicle pulled from, a curbing on street and was in collision with Chambers' vehicle, traveling west on Union street. Damages to the left front fender of Kelson's car were reported. Graded School Rate Up to Last Year Village taxpayers will pay 42 cents more on the tax rate as com- pared to last year if approve the Trustees' proposed 1955 budget in its entirety at the March meet- ing. Trustees submitted their plan last night at a budget meeting with the Town Selectmen and the Grad- ed, Rural and Union High School Districts. The tax rate of is compris- ed of the following: general fund, highway, 61 cents; special article, 'five cents; special article, 14 cents. Last year's tax rate was One special article which would add five cents on the tax rate is a appropriation for the acqui- sition of a sewer line on W a 1 bridge Hill. This sewer line is presently pri- vately owned. Parties using the sewer line want to give their ease- ment rights to the Village. The Vil- lage, if the article is approved., would take care of the upkeep. A second special article asks for to continue the South street drainage project. Approval of this article would levy an ad- ditional tax of 14 cents on the grand list. Voters approved a appro- priation for this purpose last year. About an balance remained from this appropriation, vmost of the money being used for the ex- cavation of Depot Dam. Another reason for the 42 cent hike on the tax rate is the increas- ed budgets of several depart ments. One big item is an increase of in the police department; this year as compared to last year's Trustees plan to take only the salary of Officer John Ryan out of parking meter funds this year. For several years the'salaries of three policemen have been taken from meter receipts. Some 000 was transferred into the po lice department from meter funds in 1954. Trustees feel most of the meter receipts should be kept for trans- ferral into the parking lot fun d." Consequently, the police budget hiad to be increased to compen sate for the money which has been taken from the meter fund. A new category added this year is that of removal of trees. Trus- tees are asking for for this department. Another item includ- ed in the budget is bond payment and interest of Other department budgets which are hiked have been increased the following amounts: sidewalks, 000; Village Meeting, hospi- tslization, insurance, street lights, and playground, Department budgets lowered and their decrease arc: office ac- count, salaries. and general interest, The recommended gross tax rate will yield SCHOOL TAXES Village taxpayers will also face a 12-cent tax rate increase in the Graded School District budget pro- posed for the coming year. J. Good- all Hutton, spokesman for the Dis- trict's directors, said the school un- it will seek a tax of as com- pared to last year's rate. Hutton said increased expend! tures for two additional teachers, and an increase in teach- ers' salaries are principle reasons for tax rate increases. He said other expenses of textbooks, sup plies, and insurance will push the budget up. Savings are anticipated, how ever, in reduced maintenance costs resulting from use of the new elementary school building and re- ducea administration expenses to be made possible by housing the district's officers in the new school. UNION HIGH SCHOOL Village taxpayers will also face a 62-cent tax rate for supporting the Union High School District if a new building program is a p proved, or a three-cent tax if it is not approved. (Union District bud- get figures are discussed in another article on the Town tax rate ap- pearing in tonight's edition of The STATE OAA TAX In addition, a State Old Age As- sistance tax of is to be ad- ded to all tax bills. A breakdown of the combined Village taxpayer's bill follows: Village tax Graded School District Union School District 62 cents; Old Age Assistance Members of each governmental unit present at the meeting e m phasized that their figures were only tentative. 'SPAPERJ   

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