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Bennington Evening Banner Newspaper Archive: January 08, 1955 - Page 1

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Publication: Bennington Evening Banner

Location: Bennington, Vermont

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 8, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER FIFTY-SECOND PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1955 WEATHER: Fair, warmer today; clear, cold tonight. Sun. cloudy. The Safford Street Sage Commiserates That He Finally Has Enough Saved To Build A Rumpus But Alas He No Longer Can Climb the Stairs. Three Cities Make Bids For Republicans Dem. Parley Aug. 27 WASHINGTON UP) Chicago. Philadelphia and Atlantic City sent delegations here today to bid tor the right to be host city to the 195S Republican presidential nom- inating convention. Chicago also offered its air-con- ditioned auditorium, scene of both party conclaves in 1952, to Demo- cratic National Chairman Paul M. Butler for that party's meeting. As a Republican Rational Con- vention Site subcommittee met ir closed session to receive city in- vitations, its members and Chair- man Leonard W. Hall expressed surprise that the Democrats had already picked a date for their convention without waiting for a location. Butler announced last night the Democrats had selected Mondav, Aug. 27, the second latest date in party histocy, to start their 1956 national convention. This would leave a much shorter period for campaigning than in the past. Both parties in recent years have ooened, their conventions in July. The Democrats have not yet named a site selection group and the Re- publicans, although they started the ball rolling today, are not ex- pected to decide on a location for many months. Sen. Douglas a member of Chicago's bipartisan site delega- tion, told the GOP subcommittee: "Chicago is not only the most central place in the country, but I believe its auditorium is the only air-conditioned one." Then, a bit whimsically, he added "Normally Chicago is itself air- conditioned by our lake breezes. Once in a while we have had bad luck, but by the laws of probability we should have good weather for the 1956 conventions." Death Rides The Highway In Two States 13 Persons Are Killed As Result Of Head-on Crashes Two Children Included Among Dead LORDSBURG, N.M. of five adults and two children were snuffed out Fri- day in a smashing head-on collision 21 miles east of here. State Policeman Neil Moore said the accident occurred yesterday (Eianner Howe) "HENRY AMADON, Pownal representative, Kitens at- tentively as former Gov. Les E. Emerson gives his fare- well address at opening day of legislature, Wednesday. McCarthy Prepares New Probe On Peress In Wake of Army's Qhronology Of Its Actions WASHINGTON thy (R-Wis) prepared today for a new probe into the Army's Honor- able discharge of Maj. Irving Per- ess in the wake of a comprehen- sive Army chronology of its ac- tions in the case. McCarthy called a meeting of the Senate Investigations subcom- mittee for Monday, and said he will demand that subpoenas be is- sued, possibly for Tuesday, for some of the Army officials con Bail Set For Trio Three area youths, charged with the alleged raping of an 18- year-old Bennington girl Dec. 31 in Shaftsbury, pleaded not guil- ty this morning in Municipal Court. Bail in all three cases was set cerned. McCarthy said he is still jbv George Plumb clerk of Benn. acting as chairman of the subcom- mittee until it is reorganized under Democratic control. ington County Court. The trio will be re-arraigned in Cdunty Court Monday afternoon. Under The Army, in a doc-1 a fel cannot be ument issued last night, said it. Mumcjpai Court. yVlafte fm- 'PtiT'dcc' i went ahead with plans for Peress discharge in the face o'. opposi- tion from McCarthy because a re- It was hot in Chicago during the I view indicated "there existed no 1952 meetings. Sen. Martin (R-Pa) asked the Republicans to meet next year in Philadelphia, marking the- centen- nial of the first Republican Na- tional Convention which assembled in that city in June, 1856. Cities winning the- conventions usually have to pledge around as bait to help defray con- costs. Mayor Joseph Altman was due to represent Atlantic City, which never has been host party conclave. Both parties picked .their candi- dates in 1952 and 1944 in Chicago. They shifted to Philadelphia in 1948. Marian Anderson Wins Applause In Met Appearance NEW YORK applause and cheers and a few American contralto Marian Ander- son became last night the first of her race to sing with the Metro- politan Opera. And the warm welcome given the first Negro singor in the Met's 70-year history proved but the prelude to an artistic success by the famed concert performer. Crit- ics were unanimous in praise of her rich and moving voice, heard in the second scene of Act I of Verdi's "Un Ballo In Maschera." As the curtain rose on the sec- ond scene there was Miss Ander- son as Ulrica, stirring her witch's cauldron. The audience broke into a tre- mendous ovation. Many men and women in the as well as Negro at their eyes in the emotion of the moment. Orchestra Conductor Di mitri Mitropoulis stopped the play- ing until the demonstration war over. Then Miss Anderson, a grim, taut figure' as her role called for, started to sing her first aria. "Ridell'a Bisso." After a slight hint of nervous ness the full voice heard by hun dreds of thousands since the sin? er's Town Hall debut in 1926 soared to its accustomed richness. Said music critic Olin Downe thcr U.N. personnel. State House Visiting Teacher To Come Here MONTPELIER Five German econdary school teachers, here un- ler the sponsorship of the Vermont department of Education, heard iov. Emerson give his retiring message Thursday. They are Miss Elizabeth Kauf- nan of Munich, Miss Hilde Buelow >f Goettingen, Dr. Karl' Schoen- vaelder of Berlin, Guenther Kaf- ner of Solingen and Dr. Rolf Gutte f Bremen. After a week in vill go to five Vermont ccmmuni- ies to spend a month studying a.id secondary schools ind colleges. A host teacher in each :ommunity will arrange a shedule. Miss Kaufmann will go to Spring- "ield, Miss Buelow to Bennington, Dr. Sehoenwaelder to Brattleboro, Kaymer to Rutland and Dr. Gutte to Burlington-. They will return here for a resu- me of their work and will leave the United States for Germany on Feb. 17. Plumb set bail at the follow- ing amounts: Richard Read, 18, of Bennington, John Greene, 21 of Shaftsbury and Harvey J. Pratt, 21, of Ben- nington, Read and Greene were both released after bail was furnish- ed by the former's mother, Mrs. Dorothy Read, and -the latter's brother and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Municipal Court Judge John B. Harte sentenced Frank T. Mylotte Jr., 29, of Manchester, to serve 6-12 months at the House of Correction at Windsor. Mylotte had just returned from the State Hospital at Waterbury where he was order- ed confined by Judge Harte Nov. 3 following arraignment on charges of violating probation. He was sent to the hospital for psychiatric examination and ob- sei-vation. The sentence will run concur- rently with whatever sentence the Parole Board finds' in con- nection with Mylotte's violation of his parole. Mylotte is also a parolee. Grief And Hope Companions For Dr. Sam Sheppard CLEVELAND Grief and hope were companions to Dr. Samuel H. Sheppard today in his county jail cell grief over his mother's sui- cide and hope he would win free- dom on bail and an appeal from his life sentence for murder. The cell was not the same one where the handsome, 31-year-old osteopath has spent all but four weeks since July 4 when his preg- nant wife, Marilyn, was clubbed to death in her bed. A jury con- victed Sheppard of the crime Dec. 21. After he got the news that his white-haired mother had shot her- self to death, Sheppard was moved, in spite of his protests, to the jail's observation cell where he will be under constant watch.' Members of his -family who told Sheppard of his mother's- death yesterday afternoon said he had "broken down but he regained his composure before transferring to the new cell. "Mother was very said Sheppard's oldest brother. Rich- ard, one of those who visited the jail. "She had complete faith in Sam's innocence, but all of this was just too much for her." Her husband of 39 years, Dr. RirhaT-d A, Sheppard, is hospital- ized with pleurisy. In a carefully penned two-sentence suicide note Rural Route Row May Be Aired At Caucus Tonight A Republican caucus to be held in the Armory at 8 this evening for the nomination of candidates for Town offices may erupt into an explosive discussion of the GOP Town Committee's action in causing the discharge of a postal employe. A movement was understood to be under way this morning to bring the matter under public discussion. It was also reported that a re- solution will be offered to instruct the Town Committee to reconsider its action in effecting the d i s charge of postal worker Charles W. Rounds of Pownal. GOP Chairman Roy C, Denley has refused to comment on the committee's actions in the postal situation. By virtue of a committee policy vote made at an organizational meeting early last fall, Denley is the official spokesman for the com- mittee. Other members are bound not to discuss the committee's work without clearing with the chairman. GOP committeemen, however, said today that to the best of their knowledge the committee never voted to recommend Merton Cross for the RFD 1 temporary appoint- ment. They said the committee voted in the fall to recommend Cross' temporary appointment to the RFD 2 carrier position, but said they did not know the committee tiad recommended his transfer to the Route 1 position. They also said that, to the best of their knowledge, the committee had not voted to ask Rep, Winston L. Prouty to terminate the tern porary appointment of RFD 1 car- rier Charles Rounds. A vote that Roger White be granted a carrier appointment was carried at the recommendation of hairman Denley, they added, but committee members were not aware that their action was t o cause the firing of Rounds. This vote was made at a meeting some three weeks ago. Only contests scheduled for to- night are for the positions of road commissioner. Howard Mattison, incumbent District One commissioner, seeks re-election. A World War II veter- an of service in Europe with the !ombat Engineers, Mattison seeks his fourth term. He is opposed by Albert Elwell, a town highway worker who served with the Sea- bees in World War II. James Cross, incumbent D i s trict Two commissioner, seeks the nomination for a sixth term. He s opposed .by Richard Sweet, al- so a Town Highway worker and a veteran of World War II service with the U.S. Navy. she wrote: "I can't with- out dad. Thanks for everything." Although Sheppard '.telephoned his 64-year-old mother from the jail, he did not want her to see him in those surroundings and she did not visit him or attend the trial. Much of the time she was ill with a heart ailment. She suf- fered a stroke two months ago. She last saw her youngest son when he was released on bail Aug. 16, meeting him with open arms on her front porch. A grand jury indictment returned him. to after 30 hours freedom, when a speeding automobile with i five persons in it crashed into an- other auto bearing a Minnesota couple. Moore said the car driven by Ralph Osborn Mitchell, 22, Aderia, Ohio soldier stationed at Ft. Bliss, Tex., was three feet across the center line at the time of impact. Killed were Mitchell, Sgt. and j Mrs. Richard Lavern Hursh, both, 25, of Silver Spring, Md., their two small unidentified daughters, El- wood H. Vincent, 66, Fairmont, Minn., and Mrs. Vincent, 59. Car, Truck Damaged In Arlington Crash Two motor vehicles were dam aged, but no one was hurt in an accident this morning around at the intersection of Routes 7 and 313 in Arlington, State Police have reported. 'Involved were a 1954 Chevrolet dump truck owned and of-erated Frederick F. Myers, 49, o f North Bennington and a 1954 Ply- mouth four door sedan operated by Gustav Theodore Johnson, 30, of New York City. According to the official report, the Myers vehicle started to turn on Route 313 and the Johnson car started to pass the truck. The two vehicles collided right at the in- tersection with damage resulting o the' left front fender and bump- er of the truck and the right side and left side of the Johnson cat- were considerably banged. Dam ige to the other side of the mouth resulted as the car spun around and. hit a guy. wire to a utility pole. The accident was investigated ay Tpr. Richard Davis. BALTIMORE, member of the bovine "400" stunned the barn- yard set at Edgehill Farms in learby Glyndon yesterday by giv- .ng birth to triplets. It only happens three times in every beef cattle births. Donald M. Culver, owner of Edgehill Farms, said the mother of the three bull calves was Happy ls Queen Pat n, a registered 9-year-old Aberdeen-a n g u s. The :ather was Bandolierian of Cold Saturday, FINCASTLE, Va. autos collided near this southwest Vir- ginia _town late last night, killing six persons and injuring two others. Slate police tentatively identified ihe dead as: Mr. and Mrs. Julian Wills, each about 55, and Wilmer Rea Wills, 39 all of Fincastle. George Vincent Brown, 21, of Fincastle and William Henry Clay Jr.r about 20, and Gilbert Wiley, 21, both of nearby Troutville. Two unidentified young men were taken to a hospital in Ro- anoke, 10 miles south of here. Their condition was reported serious early today. State police said the autos met at the foot of a hill on U.S. Route 220 about two miles southeast of Fincastle. One car turned upside Builder Says Glass Placed In New School Start Work On Walls (Banner Howe) STUDIES F. Bauer, representative of Landgrove, studies Senate journal. Rep. Prouty Clarifies Action In Firing Of Postal Employe; Result May Depend On Exam down and came to rest atop other vehicle, officers said. the Blaze Damages Historic Inn In Arlington ARLINGTON A dull thud and screams of the cook, Mrs. Irene Demarco, alerted Charles Fland- ers to an oil stove explosion and fire in the. laundry of Flanders Inn at 3 :15 p.m. Friday. He called the Arlington Volunteer Fire d e partment and rushed ,b> the -rear of the building with a CO2 e x tinguisher which was ineffective against a solid sheet of flames that engulfed the oil saturated room. The engine of the fire depart- ment arrived less than one- min- ute after the call, according t o Flanders. Chief Medric Grover confirmed this statement. Grover left Mack Molding, where he is employed, the moment he heard the fire whistle. When he arrived at the fire his men were already pumping water on the flames. Ob; servers and the Inn owner were unanimous in praise of the fire men. The spontaneous response of the firemen, aided by the arrivel of the East Arlington truck, saved the building. Manchester firemen also answered the call but the fire was under control when they ar- rived. Chief Grover admitted, af- ter the fire, that the historic inn, formerly the Arlington Inn, had long been a source of concern, be- ing a sprawling 42-room wooden structure over a century old. A second fire broke out at in the outfeide wall of the laundry wing. It was seen and reported by the mail bus driver. The fire de- partment again responded i m mediately and extinguished the flames before they did any further damage. Damage U.S. Rep. Winston L. Prouty to- day clarified his part in the dis charge of a postal employe here and gave indication the worker will not be returned to his position unless he receives the Town R e publrcan Committee's recommen- dation after exams have bexen held next month. Prouty, stepping where local Republican leaders had refused to tread during the past week, wired The Banner a 100-word explana tion of the situation. He said he asked, at the recom- mendation of the Bennington GOP committee, the Postoffice Depart ment in Washington to appoint Roger White of Bennington as per- was set at Flames, smoke and water caused extensive harm to the laundry and 10 guest rooms. A washing ma dhine, dryer, refrigerator motor and the oil stove were lost. The losses are fully covered by in- urance according to the owner. Route 7 traffic was halted for two hours by the Charles Flanders has operated the Inn for 13 months. At the time of the fire he, his wife, ar 11-month-old daughter and the cook were the only occupants o'. the building. The Inn is open today for busi ness as usual. Studio Fire Destroys Patsy Santo Paintings A fire in the studio of artist Patsy Santo of 224 Dewey St. was extinguished Friday evening by members of the Bennington fire, department. Firefighters, responding to s p. m. telephone alarm, con fined the blaze to the studic which is located behind a dwell ing. Fire Chief Charles Bodine saic plate glass windows were destroy ed, the exterior paint of the building severely scorched, and several of panto's paintings were consumed in the flames. He said the damage, believed caused by an overheated chunk stove, was partly covered by in- surance. Five Government Units Will Meet On '55 Budget Officials of at least five govern- mental units will meet in the Se- lectmen's office in the Town build- ing at 8 p. m., Monday, to-discuss 1955 budget plans. Town Village Trus- tees, and school board members of the Union, Graded and Rural School Districts are scheduled to- participate in the discussions. Each group 'is expected to out- line its basic tax rate requests and departmental expenditures so that all governmental units may have knowledge of fund requests which will be asked of local taxpayers in the coming year. Budget outlines presented by each group will only be tentative with more detailed budget work to be accomplished by the individual units later this month and in Fed- ruary. Wrong Transfer Puts Recreation Fund Into Hole Through an apparent misunder- standing between Treasurer Louis Sausville and Village Trustees, a balance in the playground ac- count was washed away into the- general fund leaving the depart ment with no money to finance its winter program. The error has been corrected this morning, however, and the balance put back into the play ground account. Discovery of the error was made a few days ago when Joseph Pello, chairman of the Village Recrea tion Committee, .'and Leonard 31ack, a member of the Com- -nittee, inquired, about the balance -emaining in the account. According to Village President iarold Griffin, in previous years :he balance of the accpunt on Dec. '.1 was transferred into the gener- al fund. This year, Trustees voted 10 keep the playground account separate to finance winter activi- ties of the Committee.1 The playground appropriation is i special sum voted upon at the March meeting. Last year, voters ipproved a appropriation. In future years, Griffin declared, 'he playground appropriation will be kept separately from other funds. LOS ANGELES skating ?tars Gloria Nord of Santa Monica Calif., and Eddie Delbridge of New York City were married last night in Shatto Chapel of the First Congregational Church, Dr. James W. Fifield officiating. Each is 29 years old and this was the first marriage for each. manent RFD 2 carrier and Mer- ton Cross of Bennington as tern porary RFD 1 carrier. The appointments, he added, were made by the postal depart- ment and will become effective on Jan. 16. Termination of a temporary ap- pointment as RFD 1 carrier, held for less than four months b y Charles W. Rounds of Pownal, was requested by the Bonnihgton Re- publican Committee, Prouty said. Rounds, who served as a sub stitute rural carrier for RFD 1 carrier Fred Austin for two years and then assumed his route on a fulltime basis last March, was no- tified Dec. 26 that he was being fired. No reason for his discharge was given. Prouty, however, said Rounds had been givsn a temporary ap- pointment as RFD 1 carrier b y Postmaster Stanley Pekalski in ac- cordance with department rules. His appointment was subject to termination by the postal depart ment at its Prouty said. "The Republican Town Com- mittee requested that the post- master's appointee (Rounds) be replaced by Cross as temporary carrier to serve until a Civil Ser- vice register is. established after competitive Prouty wired. Postal regulations also provide that a department employe who has already passed the Civil Ser- vice exams and placed on an em- plovment register may be auto matically given a permanent ap- pointment in another position with political endorsement. White, now employed at the postoffice as a substitute mail clerk, has passed the exams E.nd is listed on the local register and is accordingly qualified for i m- mediate appointment on a perm- anent basis to a carrier route. His appointment to the RFD 2 route has caused the transfer o f Cross, substitute RFD 2 carrier who took over the route on a full- time basis when regular carrier Clarence Morse retired this sum- mer, to the' RFD 1 position now held by Rounds. Cross -told the' Banner Friday that he had done nothing on his part to effect the transfer. He said he was satisfied with his Route 2 position and was unaware of his transfer to the other route until he received a notice from the postal department. Cross has now been placed in a position where he will compete with Rounds for the permanent ap- pointment. Rounds, a disabled World War II veteran, and Cross, also a war veteran, will both take the Civil Service exams for the position in February. A perma nent appointment, based on the committee's recommendation, wil! be made following the exams. Prouty's telegram follows: "After recommendation by Re- publican Town Committee of Ben nington ,1 requested the Post Of- fice Department to appoint Roger White permanent carrier on Route 2 and Merton Cross temporary carrier on Route 1. Understand these appointments have been made by the Post Office Depart- ment effective Jan. 16. Whenever vacancy occurs by reason of death, resignation, etc., of rural carrier, local postmaster may ap- point immediately substitute carrier until such time as depart- ment may at its discretion term- inate such appointment. Republic- an Town committee requested that postmaster's appointee Rounds be replaced by Cross as temporary carrier to serve until Civil Service register is established after com- petitive examination. Letter fol- lows." Donald Sinclair, construction su- perintendent on the new Benning- ton Elemetary School, today term- ed progress of the project as "look- ing considerably better" with in- stallation of glass in virtually all windows of the building. Sinclair, representing the Don- ald D. "Snyder Son construction company, said most of the glass installation was completed on Wed- nesday and heating of the build- ing's interior was begun immedi- ately. He reported there are still a few windows' to be finished but that glass installation to date permits a gradual increase in the pace of work under way there. "We will now begin raising par- tition walls to be constructed of cinder block and he said, "and will slowly increase the num- ber of workers employed on the project." A cut in the size of the crew was necessary several weeks ago when the delivery of window glass fell behind schedule and the school became too cold to work in without heat. Laying of the rough flooring in the multi-purpose room has been completed, he said. Architect James A. Britton is scheduled to meet with Graded School Trustees next Wednesday evening to discuss color combina- tions and other finishing details on the interior of the building. Rural Schools May Decide Soon On Building Vote Directors of the Rural Schools, Inc., may reach a decision at a regular board meeting Monday evening on whether they will pre- sent a new building plan to a special meeting of the district within the next two months. Architect Charles Helmer of Woodstocjc.has returned plans and confirmed cost estimates 'on a proposed two-room addition to the Beech Street School, as pre- sented to the board two weeks. ago. Prudential Committee members voted at that time to postpone a decision on calling a special meet- ing of the district to vote on the building proposal. Since that meeting, the Hicks School Parent-Teachers Associa- tion has urged that a four-room. school plan on the Town Farm site, defeated by voters last fall, be again presented to a special district meeting rather than a two-classroom addition oh the Beech Street School. Negligence Action Settled Out Of Court Negligence action by Francis K. Mathers of Bennington against the Central Vermont Public Serv- ice Corporation and the New Eng- land Telephone and Telegraph Company, which was scheduled for trial Jan. 10 in Bennington County Court, has been settled out of court and discontinued. Mathers received an undisclosed amount for a back injury suffer- ed by him when he stepped Into an old utility pole hole on Ben- Mont Avenue about two years ago. The hole, the plaintiff main- tained, had been poorly filled in with concrete and when he step- ped in the cement he fell down into the hole, injuring his back. Atty. George Fienberg of Benn- ington was counsel for Mathers. Attorney for the utility and tele- phone companies was John P. Carbine of the law firm of Ryan, Smith and Carbine of Rutland. Putnam Hose Elects Knapp To Sixth Term Philip Knapp was elected to his dxth term as president of the Putnam Hose, Bennington Volun- teer Fire Department, at elections leld Wednesday. Other officers elected were: Win- iield vice president; PauV Bellemare, secretary; George Ryan, treasurer; William Grant, foreman; Edward Armstrong, first assistant foreman; John Ryan, sec- ond assistant foreman; and tees, John David Murray and James Kearns. PLEAD INNOCENT SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico OB Eleven Puerto Rican Communist eaders arrested here and in the United States last October pleaded innocent in Federal Court here to- day. charged with con- spiring to advocate the overthrow by force of the U.S. government- in Puerto Rico. NEWSPAPER!   

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