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Bennington Evening Banner Newspaper Archive: January 05, 1955 - Page 1

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Publication: Bennington Evening Banner

Location: Bennington, Vermont

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 5, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1955 WEATHER: Cloudy, little change in temperature tonight, Thurs. Uncle Louie Says There Are Lots of Big Shots Around But Most of Them Think That They Are, That Way Because They Explode So Often. f-" U. S. MILITARY HONOR GUARD LEADS FUNERAL. CORTEGE United States soldiers and Marines lead the funefal cortege for slain President Jose Antonio Remon of Panama, -Jan.' 3, as crowds line Panama City stjeets in tribute to "strong man" ruler. Remon was shot by assassins at a race "track Jan. 2. Add Nearly To County Bank's Undivided Profits As Directors, President Named The annual meeting of t h stockholders of the County Nation- al Bank of Bennington was held Tuesday, 1941 shares were repre- sented out of a total of 2500 shares. It was reported that   developing new and improved counseling methods for Vermont. While his work will be confin- ed largely to Washington County, he will not be serving as an as- sistant county agent. He will work under the direction of a state steering committee with representatives from the Ver- mont Agricultural Experiment Station and the Agricultural Ex- tension Service. Chamber Speaker Will Be Soucy of FBI In Albany E. A. Soucy, division manager of the Federal Bureau of Investi- gation in Albany, will be the guest speaker at the annual dinner-meet- ing of the Bennington Chamber of Commerce Thursday night at at the Bennington Club. Kenneth Clayton, president of the C. C., will preside over the meeting. Around 100 are ex- pected to be present. Soucy nas been with the FBI since 1932 and has served as divi- sion manager in many cities in- cluding Boston, Baltimore, Birm- ingham, Pittsburgh, and Knoxville. He has been in his present post since July 1954. A graduate of Georgetown University Law School in Washington, D. C., he is mar- ried and has two daughters. Five From County Have Enlisted in The U. S. Army Five more Bennington County residents have enlisted in the U. S. Army through The North Adams recruiting office, according to M- Sgt. Richard C. Innis, who comes to Bennington every Thursday and is at the State Armory from 10 a. m. to 2 p. m. All have reported to Fort Dix, N. J. One of the group is an ex- serviceman with 41 months' duty in the Army. He is Lyle Richard Millard of East Arlington, who was discharged as a corporal and is now enlisted as a private first class. His enlistment is three years in the transportation corps. Tire other four enlistees are from Bennington. Two are the Peacock brothers, Earl John Jr. and Donald William, of 944 Gage St., who have signed for a three-year hitch in North Street Traffic Trouble Up Again; Trustees Stick To Decision on l-Way Streets River and Gage Remain One-Way Routes The slowly-dying controversy between Village Trustees and Oakley Frost over the loss of two parking spaces in front of his store on North Street blazed anew for a while last night at a "meeting of the Board. However, Trustees held their ground and left the matter in the hands of their Traffic Committee which, after studying the prob- lem thoroughly and consulting with Maj. Ray Smith, deputy com- missioner of public safety, recom- mended removal of the two spaces. The Board felt that the original action which made River and Gage one-way streets in addition to eliminating the two parking- spaces in front of Frost's should be maintained. They expressed the feeling that if the Traffic Committee reviewed the traffic problem and decided that the spaces should be restored, the rest of the Board might go along with them. However, no such action ap- peared to be forthcoming. Wal- lace E. Mattison, Ward 7 trustee, and chairman of the Traffic Committee, stood firmly behind the committee's original decision and expressed that he felt the action was the answer to the traf- fic problem. William Lauzon who is pro- prietor of Bill's Grill on River Street, appeared before the Board and said, "The one-way street idea is licking me. There is no question that it is hurting my See FIVE FROM Utiiietl on Page Four) Treasurer Sausvilie Seeks Re-Election To Five Offices Now Held Village, Town and School Treas- urer Louis F. Sausville asserted today that he will seek re-election to all five posts. Sausville will be aspiring to his jiinth .term. as. _the Town, Village and'Graded School and Rural School Districts. He-as- sumed the treasurer's duties of the Union High School District when it was formed three years ago. A native of Benninglon he for- merly was employed for 22 years at the First National Bank. He 'served three terms as an auditor before being elected treasurer. Sausville will seek the renomii nation to the town treasurer's post at the GOP Caucus to be held Sat- urday night at the armory. A popular vote-getter here for many years Sausville will be up for renommation to the Village post at the Citizen's Caucus which will be held later this month. The school districts hold their elections in the spring. No one has announced as running against "Sausvillc lor any of the posts. business." Lauzon cited two reasons why he thought River Street should not be one-way. He said the street is wide enough and is not con- gested and there are 11 businesses operating on that street. Ward 6 Trustee Carleton Wins- low immediately answered by saying he had read a recent ar- 1icle by a traffic expert and the beginning of that article read: "It 's too bad the number of people you hurt when you start -emulating traffic." The entire Board seemed to lave the same' feeling. They xiinted out that action was not aken to hurt anyone's business, out it was inevitable that some- one would be hurt wherever traf- fic decisions are made. Trustee Mattison pointed out that the matter was given quite a bit of study before a decision was made and that a traffic ex- pert had been called in for advice. He said the committee's' action was taken to benefit the greatest number of people. "I didn't care whether I lost Conflicting Budget Figures Bring Controversy On Duties Of Village Treasurer Governor-Elect Casts The Vote That Elects Howe As President Pro-Tern of Vermont Assembly First Tie Vote for Office in History MONTPELIER, m Gov.Elect Joseph B. 'Johnson, in an historic action, the deciding ballot in I favor of Bennington County Sen. Carleton G Howe today in a dras- tic race for president pro-tern of the Vermont state senate. Seo NORTH STREET ffontintiprt on Page Foiirt Slog< an Winner Also Gets 2-Day Dutch Hill Trip Bennington's contest for a slo- gan to publicize its ideal location and facilities as a center for ski- ers had a boost today as well- known Heartwellville-Dutch Hill Ski Area donated a weekend of ski- ing for the contest winner and a .friend. Miss Madeline Mulrooney, pub- licity director of the Dutch Hill area, announced that lift facilities and lunches for a two day weekend will be presented to the winner and a companion, with the compli- ments of Dutch Hill. The weekend any of 'the winner's choice when skiing is held at the area. Already assured of a first prize of this additional gift will bring to approximately 1he value of the winner's earnings, s'ince the value of the Dutch Hill donation is about The contest is open to any resi- dent of the Town of Bennington, except members of the firms and families of members of the contest committee. Slogans should be no longer than fifteen words, and should be mailed, with complete identification of the entrant, to the Chamber of Commerce Office. The contest will close 'at p. m. January 22. Further information may be obtained from Ihc Chamber of Commerce Dfficc. The rontcsl is co-sponsored by the Benninglon Merchants1 Associa- tion and the Chamber of Com- merce. CARLETON G. HOWE Never before in Vermont history had the regular vote for, this key post ended in a 15-15 tie. Johnson was called upon to break the dead- lock in his position as lieutenant governor; So close was the contest between Howe and veteran Sen. Asa S. Bloomer of Rutland county that it hinged in the final analysis on 1he dramatic appearance of freshman Sen. Graham S. Newell in the up- per chamber. Newell, a known Howe support- er, was taken frdm his sickbed to make an appearance. He left immediately for his home in St. Johnsbury after the election o f Howe. With Bloomer defeated in the move, there was no contest for a choice of a third member on the committee on committees. Sen. George C. Morse of Cale- donia county was elected on a voice vote. Democratic Sen. E. Frank Branon, the coalition choice had Bloomer emerged victorious, was not nominated. The race for president pro tern had assumed an importance in the makeup of the 1955 Biennial As- sembly unprecendented in V e r mont annals. The fight primarily was over control of the commit- tee appointments. MONTPELIER, John E. Hancock of Hardwick was elected speaker of the House to- day on the first ballot, receiving 156 votes with only 122 required for election. Rep. Cornelius O. Granai of Barre City received 63 and Rep. Basil B. Walsh of Goshen 22. On motion of Granai, seconded by Walsh, Hancock's election was made unanimous. Hancock took the oath of of- fice, administered by Secretary of State Howard E. Armstrong, at a. m. He then stepped to the rostrum to begin a session which House members are deter- mined to end considerably earlier than, 'the 1953 record-breaker, which adjourned June 4. Trustees Deny Use Of Meters For Fund Drive; Hear Plea On Sewer; Query State's Payment A request by John Proud, town chairman of the March of Dimes, that parking meter re- ceipts for two days be donated to the polio fund, was denied last night by Bennington Village Trustees. In making its decision the Board explained that it felt it would be setting a precedent and .would be obliged to do the same j thing for other worthy charity i organizations. 1 If the Village Fathers had agreed to donate meter receipts, Bennington would have followed in the footsteps of the town of Manchester which has already undertaken it. Other items of business were a request by George Hawks that the Village install a sewer and water line on a proposed street off Crescent Boulevard, an ex- planation by the State Commis- sioner of Highways why the Vil- lage didn't receive an anticipated Sec TRUSTEES (Continued On Page Four) A heated discussion arising from conflicting budget figures submitted by Treasurer Louis Sausville and Clerk Hilda Hur- ley took the spotlight at last night's meeting of Bennington Village Trustees. The core of the controversy lays in the interpretation of the duties of the clerk and treasur- er. It arose when Trustees were going over the balance for the year in the highway department. According to Sausville's figures, a balance of remained in that department. The unol- fiscal budget report submitted by Miss Hurley showed that the department had overdrawn its budget for the year by Trustees James Gibney and Leon Eldred were irked because they wanted to buy a jeep for the high- way department, but didn't do so because they thought there wr not enough money left in the highway fund. Trustees maintained that a monthly report should be submit- ted by Treasurer Sausville so it is known just how much money is left in each department. They also contend that it is not part of the village clerk's job to draw up a monthly budget report such as Miss Hurley has bean do- ing. The Board pointed out that Bruce Mosher, when he made suggestions to simplify the accounting proced- ures of the Village several months ago, said that Sausville should submit a monthly cash report to the Board. Trustees also decided they would demand the attendance of Saus- ville at all meetings. The treasur- er should be present to explain any points concerning budget figures, they contended. Sausville said that today he has not been submitting a month- ly report because the new system of accounting was not adopted un- til April. When the new "System was adopt- ed, Sausville explained it was bas- ed upon the fiscal year. The Vil- lage operates on a, year to year basis, he added. "Starting this month I will sub- mit a monthly the treas- urer said. If I had submitted a monthly report this year, he ex- plained, they would have been no use because, during the first three months, it was not known to whom or for what the money was paid out. The treasurer's figures show a balance of in the general fund. He pointed out, however, that has been borrowed in anticipation of taxes so the gen- eral fund will be in the red by Also, of the highway sur- plus will have to be set aside for :he South street drainage project, he explained. So actually there will be a balance of Beech Street School Hot Lunches Win Praise From State Education Department By ART GRANT A hot lunch program which has developed from a glass of milk and hot soup served four years ago to a full-course luncheon now pro- vided Beech Street School young- sters has won commendation from the State Education Department's school lunch supervisor. Mrs. Mai ion W, Warner of the Education Department uses the term "grown 'by leaps and bounds" to characterize the Beech Street School program's progress and credits its success to citizen ac- tion. The hot lunch program origi- nated the first winter the new school was open. A grade "B" pro- gram, it gave pupils who brought the major portion of their lunches from home a warm stimulant and supplemented their lunch-box di- ets. Today the program offers a first-class grade "A" meal com- plete "with appetizers, main courses of meat and potatoes, des- serts, bread and wholesome milk. Naturally not all the menus pro- vide for meat and potatoes but other nourishing main courses pro- vide a balanced diet and a bit of variety. Highlight of the entire program is that each meal is provided at a cost of 34 cents peV pupil, with the youngster actually paying only 25 cents for his luncheon. Miss Therese Goodermote, prin- cipal at the school, doubles as "agent" for the hot lunch opera- tion, credits cooks Mrs. Margaret Lillie of the South Stream road and Mrs. Grace Smith of Morgan Street Extension for the but thoroughly delectable dinners served. Considerable quantities of food stuffs are required to feed the more 100 pupils who eat in the downstairs cafeteria of the school each day. 'For instance, during the month of December the pupils drank more than 500 quarts of milk. When po- tatoes are served-, which is gen- era'ly twice week, more than a bushel are required each time. Juggling the purchase, use and consumption of foodstuffs for a varied menu requires close atten- tion to the job and more than the usual amount of "home manage- ment" frugality. But the task is being performed extremely well, and Miss Goodermote reports the hot lunch program is now virtual- ly self-sufficient. The Federal government pro- vides food commodities from farm surpluses on the rate of nine cents per child per meal1, thus account- ing for the ability oi the young- sters to receive a 34-ccnt meal for 25 cents. The state pays lour out of every five cents spent on milk. Miss Goodermote, as agent, these purchases and the necessary recoid-keeping, with the assistance of the cooks. (Banner Grant) Y-M-M-M-M-M-M-M! LOOKS young blonde miss was so pleased with the veal cutlet luncheon placed on her tray at the Beech Street School Tuesday noon that she didn't even notice the photographer. Pupils pick up tray from another table and then pass by kitchen window counter to receive luncheon and milk. It costs each child only 25 ceivL, per meal. Older pupils carry trays through the line for children too small to handle their own, _ _ __ _ NOTICE! We Are Open Through SATURDAY ONLY All Merchandise Selling at Wholesale CORNER CRAFT SHOP BENNINGTON DELIVERY Deliveries Local, 35c; Outside, 40c up Light Rates PHONE 6030 See the 'Buy of the Week" On Display at FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BENNINGTON Central Vermont Public Service 467 Main St. Mrs. Lillie, who has been the Beech Street cook for three years, and Mrs. Smith, her as- sistant, begin their daily luncheon preparation at 9 a. m. The cook- ing of the desserts and pastries and basic preparations for the main meal are the first items of business They work in a good-sized kit- chen complete with a large gas range, electric refrigerator, enam- el cabinet sink, ample work coun- ter space, and a nearby pantry. There are no "specialists" in this business. Mrs. Lillie and Mrs. Smith alternate throughout tlie morning in handling the various chores involved. By a. m., a pleasant and stimulating aroma of the work un- der way in the kitchen wafts up onto the main classroom floor of- fering pupils an early notice of the See BEECH STREET (Continued on Pace Four) (Banner Grant) ENJOYING HOT LUNCH Beech Street School primary pupils are busy children as they enjoy another full-course meal as a part of the school's hot lunch program which recently (received commendation from the State Department of Education. Divided into two groups, more than 100 pupils daily eat their lunches in the school's downstairs cafeteria. Their tables are covered with linoleum and the eat- ing surfaces are cleaned before and after each meal.   

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