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Bennington Evening Banner Newspaper Archive: January 4, 1955 - Page 1

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Publication: Bennington Evening Banner

Location: Bennington, Vermont

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   Bennington Evening Banner, The (Newspaper) - January 4, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                                THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER FIFTY-SECOND PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, TUESDAY, JANUARY 4, 1955 WEATHER: Cold tonight. Partly cloudy, colder Wednesday. Uncle Louie Thinks That There Was a .Lot More Pickup in the Country Store Business in the Days of Open Cracker Barrels and Prune Boxes. Johnson Planning To Present Budget To Assembly Jan. 13th; Record Size May Bring Tax Hike MONTPELIER, Joseph B. Johnson, in a bid for early action in fiscal policies, plans to present his first term budget to the legislature in the second week of the 1955 session. The 61-year-old Springfield in- dustrialist said he intends to de- liver the budget message Jan. 13. exactly one week following his inauguration as Vermont's 68th governor. With demands for expenditures at an all-time high, the Johnson administration's fiscal program is expected to call for record ap- propriations of million to million out' of the general fund and increased taxes in the neighborhood of to balance the budget. This would be for the fiscal bi- enr.ium starting July 1, 1955 and closing June 30, 1957. Following his campaign pledge, the governor-elect will undoubt- edly outline his three- year highway program. Presentation of the budget in the second week of the session would mark its earliest delivery in recent times. Johnson has been presented with department requests of out of the general fund to carry out programs already set up by law. This is about over the authorized appropriations for the current biennium. The in- coming administration is expect- ed to slice requested increases about in would es- tablish a new record for budget pruning. Johnson is committed 'to op- pose; a sales tax in Vermont, a levy which has been cited by the Meredith Tax Commission of 1951 as the only remaining source of substantial The governor-elect has said he will propose an increase in per- sonal income taxes to provide any new sary. This could be done through a surtax or by adjustment of ba- sic rates in the graduated plan. The surtax, because of its con- troversial nature in'helping build the one-time surplus, is looked upon in some quarters as being politically black-listed. Johnson's move to present his budget message so early reflects the governor-elect's determina tion to let the General Assem bly know as quickly as possible where he stands on fiscal mat- ters. The question of revenues and taxation is expected to be the big problem before the 43rd biennial legislature. Bennington's First National Bank held its 91st annual stock- shares of capital stock outstand- ing were represented. Reports disclosed that more than was added to serves and undivided profits after provision for the payment Irom 1954 income of dividends to stock- lolders that in Service Center Board Hears Of Help Given To 60 Mrs. Mabel Towart, executive secretary of the Family .Service Center, told board members at a meeting Monday evening she han- dled some 60 cases during the three month period beginning in October and concluding in Decem- ber. In her quarterly report, Mrs. Towart defined the objectives of the Service Center as to "assist the family and the individual in developing both the capacity and the opportunity to lead to personal ly satisfying and socially useful lives." Mrs. Towart, who is assisted by Mrs. Dorothy Ellsworth of Arling- ton, 1old the board the services of Di. Earl Brown Williamstown, Mass., have been obtained by the Center for psychiatric consultation. Miss Caroline Darlington report- ed that contributions to the Center to date have fallen off from last year's receipts at this time. She said that the fund drive will con- tinue and expressed hopes that ad- ditional contributions will be for- tinue its work on a similar scale in the coming" year. BLIND BOY'S DOG Russell Doming, blind since birth, cuddles his pet boxer Buddy which had been lost for three days in Boston. Buddy is catching up on sleep lost in his wanderings. Police had combed neighborhood to find the blind lad's lost companion. Lieut. Gov.-Elect Bailey Quits Postoffice Post; Not Worried Over Coalition; Fears Tax Hike Promote Dunham To Engineer Post At Ben-Mont Raymond W. Dunham, 41, of Grandview street, has been pro moted from technical engineer to the newly created position of as- sistant plant engineer, it was an nounced today by the manage ment at Papers, Inc. RAYMOND W. DUNHAM In his new job Dunham will be responsible for the supervision of the maintenance program. He will report to Merton Snow, plant en- gineer. Dunham has been with the company for seven years. He pre- viously worked in the engineeriftg department of Remington Arms. He is-married and has two child- ren. Bennington Business Adds To Grogan Fund Two more Bennington businesses were today listed as contributors to the fund established to aid Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Grogan of Wal- loomsac, N. Y., parents of five children burned to death on Dec. 16. Contributors named today includ- ed J. H. Winslow employes, and Max Oil Service, These firms joined the employes, local union and management of the Poly- graphic Company of America which donated to the Grogan Fund last week. The fund has now surpassed the mark and is being used to provide household accommodations and for the bereaved parents. Four Escape Injury When Car Overturns Four persons escaped serious injury on the Burgess Road at this morning when the ,car in which they were riding skidded on the snow-covered road, over- turned, and tore off the top of the station wagon. Driver of the car, State Police reported, was Carolyn Van Pat- ten, 38, of Burgess Road. She suf- fered a bruised right leg. Three passengers, Mary Bowen, owner of the vehicle, Robert Rose and Charles Kelson, all of Benn- ington, were not injured. The car sustained extensivr damage, Cpl. John who is investigating, reported. Two persons received minor in juries at this morning on Rt. 9 near Fillmore Farms when a pickup truck and car collided, Tpr. Richard Davis reported. Driver of the pickup, owned by Fillmore Farms, was Lewis A. Bishop, 68, of Bennington. Pa- tricia Ann Kickbride? 24, of Lud- low was operator of the car. The pickup truck" was stopped on the highway and the Kickbride cat; failed to halt in time, Tpr. MONTPELIER, (ffl Lt. Gov.- Elect Consuelo N. Bailey announced last night she had tendered her resignation as a member of the Na- tional Post Off Advisory--Boardi. elected lieutenant governor in. the United States, said she was quit- ting the federal post because it vvas incompatible with, a in the Vermont state constitution. The state constitution s'ays no elected state official shall held an office of profit or trust under au- thority of Congress. It was this same provision which forced the resignation of Frank Jorliss as a member of the Board 3f Social Welfare when he became Federal Housing Administrator. Mrs. Bailey announced her de- ision to quit the. advisory post of- ice position during an appearance jn WMVT-TV's panel show, "You Can Quote Me." She told reporters quizzing her .lowever, that she had no inten- tion of relinquishing her post as Re- publican national committee worn an from Vermont. r Turning to the forthcoming ses- sion of, the legislature where she will preside over the state senate, Mrs. Bailey said she was not in' the least worried about a reported coal- ttion designed to strip her of her committee appointing power. She also denied taking any part in the' tSiree-way fight for Speaker of the House; the position she held during the last session of the leg- islature. ''I never enter into political was the way Mrs. Bailey put it. The Lt.-Gov.-elect told reporters the big problem facing incoming session members will be finding additional revenues to meet in- creased demands for state service. She said she was opposed to a sales tax and indicated it might be necessary to raise the state in- come tax to provide needed rev- enue. Oratory Contest Deadline Is Set Back to Jan. 21 Finals for the local competi tion in the American Legion Ora- torical contest must bo completed by Jan. 21, it was announced to day by the cochhirmen, Ben' nington Post Commanden Charles Sawyer and Past Com niander Bernard J. McNaney Originally the date was fo; earhci tliis montli. The oratorical contest is a part of the Americanism program of the Legion. Department Com- mander J. Raymond McGinn SEE ORATORY (Continued ort Page Roy M. Paddock Is President Of First National Bank; Staff Is Praised; Add To Reserves ,Eugene Shea Retires After 35 Years and continue concentration of ef- fort to health improvement. At !iolders' meeting today. moment, Mr. Shea is in Flor- of shares of the ida. totaling Also, excess of 47% of the During "Gene" Shea's- many years with the bank, he had par- ticipated in and observed its steady growth to become more and more one of the important business in- stitutions in the area. William B. Shea was elected vice president and 1rust officer. Burton Dank's total resources are made up of cash and government se- curities. The ratio of capital and reserves to deposits is 1 to 7.5. in other words the capital and re- serves equal more than 13% of deposits. Stockholders present were re- minded of the extent to which the industry, loyalty, interest and ef- forts of the bank staff were im- portant in the results shown. The chairman was requested to advise the members of the staff that those in attendance at the meeting were appraised of their good record. Directors elected at the stock- holders' meeting were John D. Clawson, Joseph G. Davidson, William H. Eddington, Charles Fienberg, Francis E. Morrissey, Roy M. Paddock and Robert M. Werblow. j At the directors' meeting w'lich! followed that of the stockholders Roy M. Paddock was elected presi- dent of the bank. He succeeds Eugene J. Shea Jr., who had serv- ed the bank in various capacities for 35 years, nine years as its president. Mr. Shea was granted a leave of absence during 1954 for reasons of health. Now as the bank be- gins its 92nd year, Shea has suc- cumbed to _ advice that he retire from his active bank schedule the bank W. Potter becomes cashier and assistant officer to succeed "Bill" Shea. Armand U. Lampron was 'lamed assistant cashier. Robert M. Werblow was re- flected chairman of the Board of Directors and Francis E. Morris- sey chairman of the Executive Committee, offices they held dur- ing 1954. Town Surplus Will Be Applied To Cut Unbonded Debt; Means Four And Half Cent Tax Cut (Banner Barschdorf) top of this station wagon was torn off early this morning when it overturned on the Bur- gess Road. One person received a minor bruise. Three other occupants escaped injury. Selectmen Again Table Action Leasing Land Pending Suitable Agreement To Use Alumni Field ROY M. PADDOCK Ray Elliott Buys Hotel Pharmacy In Brattleboro Ray E. Elliott, formerly of Ben- nington and pharmacist at the Brat- tleboro Drug Co. for II years and its manager for five, has purchas- ed the Hotel Pharmacy in Brat- tleboro from George Christian. The new Hotel Pharmacy cor- poration, of which Elliott is presi- dent and treasurer, was formed Dec. 31. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott (the former Florence Houston of Ben- Mrs. Miriam H. Crispe and Miss Louise A. Crispe of Red Bank, N. J., are directors of the new firm and Atty. A. Luke Crispe is clerk. Elliott said he will retain the pre- sent agency and bup ticket offic'e of the Vermont Transit Corp. He said he hoped to enlarge the stare's prescription department in the near future and planned some re- modeling. The store's lease has another three years to run. Chris- tian had operated the store for 14 years with his brother, Edward. Elliott before moving to Brattle- boro was a pharmacist in several drug stores here and at one time operated his own drug store. Levin To Quit Posts To Return To Practice Village Atty. Reuben Levin said this morning that he will not seek a fourth term. The 58-year-old attorney said he wants to return to his private law practice. He also announced that he would not seek reappointment to the village attorney post in North Bennington. Levin served as Bennington vil- lage attorney in -1949, 1953 and 1954. Levin is presently moderator of the Graded School District and a deputy commissioner of the Vermont State Boxing Commis- sion. Davis explained. The pickup sustained moderate damage to its left .front fender and the car extensive damage to its front end. Five Are Leaving Today For Service Induction Five registrants are scheduled the Bennington County Service headquarters, to leave Selective State Armory, this afternoon by chartered bus for Albany, where they will be inducted into the arm- ed forces tomorrow, Mrs. Viola Conley, clerk, announced today. One of the boys is, a transfer from St. Albans, Douglas Wal- lace. The others are: Clifton Tyr- rell, Bennington; Gerald Legacy North Bennington; Dwight Tifft, Pownal and Jesse King, West Rupert. Seven registrants will report for pre-induction Jan, 19. physical exams on Three Town Officers To Seek On Republican Ticket Three additional incumbent Town officers announced today they will be candidates for the Republican nomination for re-election to their positions. Town Clerk Miss Mary Hodeck of Pageant street said she will seek the GOP nomination at a caucus to be held in the Armory Saturday evening. Miss Hodeck will be seeking re-election to her 15th term as Town Clerk. Board of Lister Chairman Fran- cis J. Hogan of 245 Elm St., ac- knowledged he will seek the GOP Bennington Selectmen again tabled action on signing a lease with the Vermont Soldiers Home the use of 100 acres of Town farmland until i "concrete progress has been made toward a new lease for Alumni Field." Selectmen, who have held the lease papers for nearly two months, said they will "be obli- gated to give the. lease when the Home comes through with the field 'lease it has indicated will be with the Graded School District or some other unit of the muni- cipality." Board members have steadily maintained that one of the main reasons for entering into the lease of Town farmland to the Home was the fact that the Home has given substantial amounts of its available agricultural land to' the Town as an athletic area and the state for its highway depart- ment garages. They said they would move to sign the lease papers when the Home has shown it has renego- tiated the Alumni Field lease with responsible officials. Home officiajs indicated in No- William Burton Seeks Position As Ward 7 Trustee William J. Burton, 28, Independ- ent, announced today that he would seek election to the lage trusteeship. Incumbent Trustee Wallace E. Mattison told the Banner yester- day he ivould not seek a third term. Burlon, who lives on Gage street with his wife, Barbara, has been a resident of Vermont for 10 years. He was formerly employed on the editorial staff of the Banner. He now serves in the capacity on The North Adams Transcript. nomination for a three-year-term vember that a committee of Benn- on the Board of Listers. He has ingtonians, who are Home Trus- served as Lister since 1940, with tees' has been appointed to work the exception of three years' duty in the Armed Forces. Lister Mrs. Catherine Dermody of the West Road said she will seek the GOP bid for re-election to a one-year term on the Board of Listers. She is completing her first term this year. Four Cars Damaged In Two Village Crashes Four vehicles received extensive damages resulting from two ac cidents within a half-hour of each other, Monday evening, Village Police reported today. Police said the first accident oc- curred at p.m. on Main street when Mrs. William Thomson o f West Hartford, Conn., struck the door of a car operated of Anna Stockwell Towslee of the Burgess Road. Mrs. Towslee had just opened the left hand door of her car into the traffic lane after parking i n front of Wood's Print Shop, police said. Damages to the right 'front fend- er, headlight and grill of the Thomson car were reported. Mrs. Towslee reported damage to the left front door of the car she was operating. At 8 p.m., police said vehicles operated by Ruth B. Thomas of 208 Grove St. and Joseph C. Gi- ard 6f 242 Depot St. sustained dam- ages when they were involved in a collision at the intersection o f County and Depot streets. Police reported that the Thom- as vehicle .vas traveling east o n County street and applied its brakes at the intersection. The op- erator's loot slipped Irom the brake pedal and struck the accelerator, causing the car to go through the intersection and collide with the Giard vehicle. Damages to the front of the grill, right fender and headlight of the Thomas car and to the left front door, fender and hub-cap of the Giard vehicle were reported to police. WILLIAM J. BURTON He said ho was satisfied with of Trustee Mattison and with the Graded School officials in a new lease of the field. Pre- viously it had been reported that a new lease would not be consid- ered until this coming September and the field would be operated under the jurisdiction of the: Home's Trustees. Selectmen will begin signing a single pay order for all weekly Town bills at their regular meet- ing next week. Under the new plan, similar to one installed ear- ly last year by the Village, Select- men sign one order approving all outstanding bills and authoriz- ing the Town Treasurer to pre- pare and sign checks. Previously, Board members in- dividually signed each of the checks and pay orders. Agent Miss Alma Sausville an- nounced that 24 badges to be worn by members of the Town con- stable force have been received and may be picked up by con- stables. Constables who drive automo- biles must show proof of holding liability insurance on their cars. Miss Sausville also reported that dresses and sweaters- were sent to five women and one boy who are residents at the Brandon State School for distribution on Christmas Day. Each of the re- cipients is a resident of the Town of Bennington. A special letter of commenda- ticn and appreciation was voted to be sent to the Merchants Asso- ciation for its work in decorating the Town and Village office build- ing this year. Selectmen noted that the dec-: orations were the most extensive ever put upon the building and said the Association deserved credit for its efforts to make the community more attractive at the Christmas season. The meeting was held at the home of Richard Santvoord on Monument Road; and marked the first meeting Van Santvoord has been able to attend since be- ing stricken with an illness in the [Buckley to attend all sessions. hopes to carry out some of the programs started by him. If elect- ed, Burton said his primary con- cerns will be the dump, sewer and parking problems. Burton is chairman of the Vil- lage Committee for City Govern ment, a member of the local Lions and Bennington Clubs abled Seabee veteran. -He graduated from Arlington High School and attended Goddard College, the Rhode Island Col- lege of Education and Bryant Business College. Burton said he is not sTire whe- ther he will enter the citizens' cau- cus. Leon Eldred, Ward 1 trustee, announced yesterday that he would seek a second term. The Ward 1 and Ward 7- trusteeships are the only two which will be voted up- on this yearr Bennington's unbonded debt of will be reduced as a re- sult of the Board of Selectmen's decision Monday night to apply in surplus funds against money borrowed to finance covered bridge work several years ago. Chairman T. Garry Buckley proposed the plan to reduce Town indebtedness to in a scheme which will mean a tax rate reduction of at least four and one-half cents in 1955. Buckley's plan, moved by Se- lectman Richard Van Santvoord and seconded by Selectman Paul Keliey, will apply of a 1954 General Fund surplus now totaling more than against borrowed notes which financed the covered bridge work. A loan has been re- duced to with the Town i making annual payments of 500 plus interest on the note. Application of the surplus money against the remaining debt will bring the sum down to which then can be balanced by assets of now held in re- serve in the Flood Damage fund. Keliey noted that it would be wiser, in his opinion, to apply the surplus against the indebtedness and to continue the regular prac- tice of borrowing money in anti- cipation of taxes to operate the Town until 1955's tax money is raised. He pointed out that the To'lTi is paying two per cent interest on the unbonded while it can borrow in anticipation of taxes at a rate of one and three-quarters per cent interest. Van Santvoord agreed that the double purpose of the plan, to reduce the Town's debt and to save one-quarter per cent interest on municipal financing, was in the best interests of the taxpay- er and the community. Had the money not been ap- plied against the -indebtedness, it could have been used to fi- nance the Town's operations through the month of February at least and might have resulted in a 12 to 15-cent tax rate re- duction in 1955. BuckJcy, however, said it was better to reduce the tax rate by four and one-half cents now than to give voters a 'false feel- ing of security" which he sug- gested would result from a radi- cal slash in the tax rate this year. "We have come by this sur- plus primarily through windfalls (unexpected income received from state refunds and on relief settlements reached in the and only or actually represents savings and economies. It would not be wise to give voters the impression the Town government can be operat- ed on a tax rate 15 cents lower than last year's rate when we know that isn't the Buck- ley said. Keliey endorsed Buckley's state- ments, saying that it would be wrong to encourage voters to think the town could get by on a much lower rate when Select- men in the'future will probably not have the benefits of the large state refunds and poor relief settlements uncovered this year Buckley said reduction of the debt will provide a tax reduc- tion through the fact that the an- nual payment will not have to be made this year and future pay- ments against the debt can be made as desired since the Town- will be well ahead of its debt'ob- ligation. "If voters don't approve our Plans" Buckley said "they cut the tax rate and force us to operation a drastically curtailed No discussion was held on what would be done with the rest of the surplus, but it appeared he Town will use the refiSiSns three to four thousand dollars to finance its 1955 operations and thus reduce the amount of money BOSTON gutted a four- story brick building housing .the Acme Soap Co. and the Boston Statuary Products Co. with a loss estimated unofficially at The blaze yesterday forced 37 employes of the two firms to the street. Officials said the firs' apparently started in an exhaust fan which ignited paint fumes in the statuary workshop. first week of December. M e e t i'n g nights have been changed to Monday evenings to enable State Senator T. Garry O. EAGLES Regular Meeting TONIGHT AT 8 O'CLOCK NOTICE! We Are Open Through SATURDAY ONLY All Merchandise Selling at Wholesale CORNER CRAFT SHOP 'SPAPERI 'V 'SPAPERJ   

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