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Bennington Evening Banner Newspaper Archive: January 3, 1955 - Page 1

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Publication: Bennington Evening Banner

Location: Bennington, Vermont

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   The Bennington Evening Banner (Newspaper) - January 3, 1955, Bennington, Vermont                        THE BENNINGTON EVENING BANNER FIFTY-SECOND PRICE FIVE CENTS BENNINGTON, VERMONT, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, WEATHER: Fair, colder' tonight. Cloudy, colder Tuesday. A Lot of Fellows Who Drive a Car With One Hand- In 1955 Will Be Headed for a Church Aisle Some Will Walk Down and the Rest Will Be Carried Fatality Usher New Year Into County (Banner Barschdorf) FATAL CRASH SCENE Afato in which Richard F. 18, of North Adams was killed early New Year's morning. Mishap took place on Route 346 ia North Pownal. Richard Ryan Killed As Car Crashes Barn Happened on Route 346 Cushman And Union Join Plan Of Education And Counseling For Workers Near Retirement First Firm In New England To Sign NORTH BENNINGTON An "epochal understanding" reached by representatives of the H. T. Cushman Mfg. Co. and three other employers with leaders of the Up- holsterers' Internationa] Union, AFL, will result JH dev.ejgpnient.af. a program of education and counseling for work- ers approaching retirement age dining the coming year. As signed by the point industry- union representatives m early De- cember, the agreement will begin a program to supplement the UIU Pension Plan Cushman Co. was the first firm in New England to sign the union pension plan this past year. Under terms of the agreement, the Institute for Human Adjust- ment at the University of Michi- gan will serve as professional con- sultant in preparing and develop- ing a detailed program. Behind the program will be a new effort to psychologically pre- pare prospective retirees from in- dustry for a new position in life to better acclimate them to chang- ed conditions after they retire. Need for such a program was highlighted by the eager but per- plexed response from retirees to the Union's proposal to establish a self-contained Retirement Vil- lage in Florida. Union and mangement expressed concern that pension .programs, far from solving' all problems, are creating new ones capable of the wasting of good will, morale indus- trial humaneness and efficiency planned by both Federal Social Security and private industry man- agers. Representing the Cushman Co. on the Joint Industry-Labor Com- mission on Retirement Preparation, which will meet periodically to re- view the detailed programs plan- ned, is Hall W. Cushman of Noith Benn'ngton. Other industry leaders on the Commission include Grant G. Sim- mons Jr. of the Simmons Mfg. Cy mattress and industry; Kenneth Kroehler of the Kroehler Mfg. Co., upholstered furniture; and J. T. McGillicudy of the National Casket Co. Top officials of the UI Union are representing employes on the Com- mission. Railroad Okays Embankment Cut For Drainage Job Bennington Village Trustees have 'received permission from the Rutland Railway, Inc., to cut through an embankment owned by the railway in back of Mike Hogan's barn on Washington Avenue as they carry out the South, Street drainage project. Trustee Leon Eldred, chairman of the Board's Highway Commit-] hVs" ca7at io'aVm.'Sunday on tee, said it is necessary to cut Rt. 7 in Pownal. trirough the bank on which Zasuly told Cpl. Poljacik that railway tracks formerly laid to; he was crowded off the road by a change the course of Rockvvood I northbound vehicle and his car hit I a guard rail and went over an em- Four Highway Mishaps Usher in New Year for State Police; One Hurt The investigation of four high- way mishaps ushered in The New Year for members of the Vermont State Police who are stationed at the Shaftsbury outpost. Only one person was injured as a result of the four mishaps, State Police reported. Cpl. John Poljacik said that Rich- ard L. Zasuly, 30, of Brooklyn, Barker and Wheeler, architects of Albany, in a survey made for the Village, recommended this action as part of the drainage pro- ject. The excavation of Depot Dam, also a part of the drainage pro- ject, has already been completed. 'Eldred explained that Rock- wood Brook, which runs down in back'of the Armory, under Wash ington Avenue and drains into Depot Pond, will empty into Dewey Brook when the work is done. He said that Dewey Brook runs down one side of the rail- way bank and Rockwuod Brook down the other. A channel will be cut through tne bank and Rockvvood Brook will empty into Dewey Brook, he explained. Trustees have also gained per- mission from Morris Levin and the Winslow brothers, who own a plumbing store on West Main Street, and the Winslows own part of the land on which the work is to be done. bankment. A passenger, Miss Violet Meyer- son, 22, also of Brooklyn, was not injured. Cpl. Poljacik estimated about damage to the car. Minor damage was sustained by two cars when they collided on Rt. 7 in Shaftsbury at a. m. Sun- day, reported Tpr. John Heffernan, who investigated. He said Merle W. Goodnow, 52, of Shelburne Falls, Mass., and Bar- rett Scoville, 18, of West Hartlord, Conn., were drivers of the two cars. Neither driver wps injure J Cars operated by Barbara Hoi land, 29, of SpringfieM, Mass., and Francis R. Tifft 2_, airman of Bennington and Riverhead, N. Y., sustained minor damage when they collided on Rt. 7 in Siiaftsbury at 5 p. m. Sunday. No one was injur- ed. The mishap was, investigated by Tpr. Heffernan. A car driven by Charles D. Ken- yen, 21, of North Bennington tore down three guard rails on Route 67 in Shaftsbury at this morn- Is Spent On Polio Cases In This County An expenditure of more than for polio treatment and ed- ucation has been reported for the past year, Ernest Roe, secre- tary of the Bemungton County Chapter, National Foundation of Infantile Paralysis, announced to- I day. More than of the total ex- penditure was involved in care and treatment given thiee Bennington Cnunty polio victims, Roe said. In a report to Donald A. Hem- enway, -cam- paign director, 'Roe- noted the area experienced three mild polio cases and one death from the dis- ease in 1954. Costs of this care will be reported in he said. Roe said a cash balance1 of 529 on Dec. 31, 1953 was supple- mented by as the chapter's share of the 1954 March of Dimes campaign. Another was added in the form of a refund from na- tional headquarters and was derived from interest on the sav- ings account, to provide ..funds of During the past year, polio treatment expenses were p r e sented xhe local chapter on three cases. Casel, a Manchester De- pot youth, had expenses totaling A second Manchestei De- pot youth, stricken at the same time in 1953, had expenses amounting to In addition, a, Readsboro polio victim, recup- erating from an illness m 1952, was given treatment amounting to March of Dimes campaign ex penses of were reported paid, and the expense of training two Putnam Memorial Hospital nurs- es for polio work, amounting to was paid by the Bennington County Chapter. Roe said the chapter currently has a treasury balance of Only 23 out of 10 other chapters in the Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine area have balances in their treasuries. The Countv Chapter Secretary noted that 1955's campaign funds, for which a drive began here to- day, will be divided on a 50-50 bas- is with the National Foundation, instead of a one-third share which was in effect last year "This change in the division of funds will give our County Chap- ter a wonderful opportunity to in- rrease ifs Rne said, "and to insure that we will bp ab'e to meet future expenses and con- tinue with our polio treatment for all individuals afflicted with the disease." NORTH POWNAL Vermont's first highway fatality of 1955 was recorded here at 5 a. m. New Year's Day. Killed wa? Richard F. Ryan, 18, of North Adams when the car in which he was riding plunged over an embankment on Rt. 346 and traveled some 125 feet before crashing into a barn owned by Clarence Hurley. Driver of the car, Richard A. Powell. 19, alstf of North Adams, said he fell asleep at the wheel. The car was owned by Kenneth Hunt, formerly of Bennington, but now a resident of North Adams. Powell received only minor lacer- ations and abrasions. State Police said that Ryan was apparently thrown out of the car when it plunged down the embank- ment, but some part of his clothing caught on the ear and he was. diag- ged for a distance. Powell told State Police that he and Ryan were returning from New York state when the crash oc- curred. Mrs. Hurley said she heard the crash, but didn't know what had happened until some passing mo- torists stopped. Extensive damage was sustained j by the car. A corner of the barn 'was ripped off as a result of the 'crash. I Investigating the mishap were Cpl. John Poljacik and Tpr. Gor- don Mooney, State Police, and I State's Atty. Stephen Gilman. Ryan's body'was taken by Hop- kins Ambulance of Williamstown to the Walbridge Funeral Home in Eennington and was later trans- ferred to the. Montagna Funeral Home in North Adams. Services were held at 9 a. m. to- day from the St. Francis' Church, North Adams Interment will be (Lloyd Photo) AT FIRE Russell of the Middle Pow- nal Road shown in foreground talking with Alfred Bot- tufti of Bennington shortly after an early Sunday morn- ing fire swept a barn on Russell's property, destroying a valuable Great Dane dog and causing other damage. in Southview Cemetery, North Adams. Dr. Flood said Ryan died of a fractured skull and internal in- juries. Ryan is survived by his mother, Mrs. Margaret R. Ryan, with whom he resided, and one sister, Mrs. Rita Raspi of Baltimore, Md. He was employed as a machine oper- ator by the Berkshire Industry Brush Co. Violent Deaths Take Lives of 18 In New England BOSTON England today counted 18 violent deaths in' the 54-hour New Year's holiday week- end which ended at midnight last night. Fifteen died in traffic mishaps; two in fires and one was killed in a miscellaneous accident. Connecticut had the worst toll of the New England states with seven traffic fatalities and one fire death Massachusetts counted four dead on the highways. Rhode Island had two traffic deaths. New Hampshire and Ver- mont had one each. Maine had one violent death A year ago, 22 died violently ovei the three day holiday in New Eng- in traffic accidents, three in fires and six in miscellaneous mishaps. The 1955 'New Year's holiday deaths in New England were: Blaze Levelled Russell's Barn; Is Total Loss Low Temperatures, Increased Ram, Snow Combine To Make 1954 Wet Year Says Paul Bohne Precipitation Was 47.46 Inches See VIOLENT DEATHS (Continupo 
                            

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