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Salt Lake Tribune: Friday, July 1, 1949 - Page 1

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   Salt Lake Tribune, The (Newspaper) - July 1, 1949, Salt Lake City, Utah                                RADIO NEWS Interraountain Network Statioi Montfajf Thrimch rrKUy WEATHER Mostly cietr Friday Detalh M 78 SALT LAKE FRIDAY JULY 1949 PRICE FIVE CENTS George SplitLewis Ordels Sharply Over Taxes Week in Pits Ignores Limits Output East of Mississippi WHITE SULPHUR i fiscal year deep in the red and a drive opened in congress to w Va June 30 i cut luxury taxes from their wartime LeWjS Thursday ordered his soft Southerner Drives for Economy President Asks Higher Levy June 30 Harry S Truman and Walter George clashed sharply over taxes and government spending Thursday as the treasury ended a who wants taxes at his news conference that George never has wanted taxes high enough to run the George said in reply that Im satisfied congress will not increase taxes at this I think he Truman is almost the single supporter of the theory that rates ought to be in George The uni versal opinion of the American people is that taxes ere too high and ought not to be Top Tax Expert George is one of the top tax experts in He is chair man of the taxhandling senate finance committee which voted Thursday to cut excise levies as a boon to business and buying The bill would reduce federal excise which amount to sales on telephone and tele graph bills and purchases of many of daily The war time still in ef run from 10 to 25 of the purchase They are levied on things as travel luggage and wom ens light bulbs and theater The TrumanGeorge argument snd the committees surprise vote highlighted a fiscalyear end which also saw these other devel opments Republican Leader A move by house Republican leader Joseph Martin of Massachusetts to bypass the and means committee innd get action on a similar lux cut bill he introduced Treasury statement show Inirthat to June 28 the govern ment spent more than 3 It has taken since last June The statement actually showed re Walter He little likelihood of tax Traffic Starts On Berlin El Railway J July 1 UP Traffic over Berlins elevated rail way a vital link in the west ern GermanyBerlin railroad sys was resumed early The first trains began rolling at coal miners to work only three days a week temporarily and the operators promptly called the ac tion The United Mine Workers pres ident got around his traditional no no work policy by taking it upon himself to order the short work week which the operators had The contracts covering miners expire at East of Mississippi All union mines east of the Mis sissippi are included in the Lewis order to work only Tues day and Wednesday each the work dayi will be Wednesday and Thurs next week because the miners are on a 10day vacation which ends after Lewis gave no reason for exclud ing the far western which produce about tons an George Love of head of the northwest with whom Lewis has been nego tiating termed the threeday week The operators fear it violates the antitrust j Love told a news conference that Lewis order disregards the eco nomic needs of the the wel fare of union and their and his contract with the Ponder Court Action He said he is not certain the operators would or could take any court The operator spokesman said the mine would keep then pits open for any want to work on Friday and A big surprise was Lewis de cision to include the Southern Coal iceipts were higher than spending income and the spend ing figure didnt include a 000000 surplus from last year Thursj Producers and Steel which was carriedover for j He has been holding negotiations with them and both groups feared he intended Coplon Guilty as Faces 13Year Term Judith Coplon walks from federal district court Thursday after a jury convicted her of being a spy for Archibald her follows her through She JSyear prison PRESIDENT SAYS ing this year on the European the Sovietcontrolled rail rfcoverv Final official wav was partially Bartich Badly Misinformed In Critique of War Plan June 30 I He will continue to fight rfcovery figures for the full fiscal year iijfting tHfe unofficial railroad to apply special pressures on will be available of the Russians Lewis accomplishes these things ipres Harry g Truman said Tfnirsfor labor legislation he wants RE meanwhile clamped new residej by his move Thursday as ToftHartley repeal is in on to BerHnj He ayoids a strjke which day that Bernard Baruch was thfi party Asked h 5142 Senate Vote Kills TH Repeal By LOUIS STARK June 30 NYT by a vote of 51 to Thursday wrecked the admin listrations six months effort to repeal the TaftHartley Taft won a smashing victory when he led a RepublicanDemocratic coa lition to adopt a modified ver sion of the law which he helped sponsor two The which made some 28 changes in the present labor preserved its Soon after the senates Harry S Truman told re porters that the fight for the re peal of the raftHartley would go on as hard as he could make No Rescue Attempt in house circles there appeared to be no indication that an attempt would be made to rescue administration bill from committee in preparation for an other onslaught on the present Speaker Sam Rayburn told reporters that he could not gay what the net move would Other administration leaders ap peared to be In the face of organized labors abandon ment of the fight for the present session of congress it was gen erally felt here that no action would be taken in the On the senate the atti tude of administration supporters was that they were glad the Issue is being made and that the votes would decide in November Tense Crowd Five votes were taken before a tense and crowded senate gal lery before the senate adopted the Taftsponsored labor By a vote of 53 to an amend ment to nullify all state laws out lawing the union shop was re Without any opposition from the senate adopted by voice Defense Vows Appeal Bid Sentence Slated Today Juno 30 federal jury Thursday con victed Judith Coplon as a spy for tolling the word guilty on both counts of an espionage charge that could send her to prison for 13 Judge Albert Reeves told newsmen he will sentence Miss Coplon shortly after 9 The sentence will follow arguments on Miss Coplons con tinued Neither the judge nor federal attorneys indicated any desire to send Miss Coplon to prison before her second trial in New York next Made No Outcry Unflinching to Miss though made no outcry or other sigh of emotion u the jury delivered verdict after 26 hours and 58 minutes of delib Her 65yearoid Mrs Rebecca Coplon of who has been in constant attendance since the beginning of the trial last April was not present the courtroom when the verdict was The a was re ported ill in a downtown Defense Counsel Archibald Pal mer immediately announced will carry the case to the circuit court of appeals and if necessary to the supreme Palmer also asked Judge Reeves to postpone sentence until after Miss Coplons second trial on espionage conspiracy charges in New government attor neys Delay The government any delay in imposition of said Chief Prosecutor John Kel ley The case in New York if mere We are now deal ing with Kclleys words stunf Palmer a furious Theyve got their pound of the defense lawyer shouted Do they want the blood with it Palmir told Judge that i once sentence Miss Coplons bond will be revoked and June 30 I she will have to go tg He said Foster Dulles testified Thursday raise a new bond John Foster Dulles Refutes Hiss testimony nn Dulles Recalls He Asked Hiss to Resign O v Years Deficit Continued congressional wreswestern allied authorities charged could be unpopular with the misinformed in stating lheyoulri sjgn the Taft bill passed by I tlinjr over how to cut Truthat the move was direct viola 000 soft coal and would government had no standby mobilthe senate Thursday as a sub tn j event otstittite for the administration he said he would make known his stand when a bill tlinfr over how to cut Truthat the move was direct violaj 000 soft coal and would government had no standb mans budget to ljon of the Sovjct agreement to forte a showdown with the govization plan for use in prevent the treasury from going their ernment and lawmakers strugI still deeper into the red in the gljng with labor war ral vear that starts Elevated s 2 cuts down tne enormOus He told a news confore cal vear Truman has estimated next years deficit will be nearly unless he gets the income tax hike he Economy bloc leaders in congress ia month by the strike of west Service on the elevated stockpile of postponing the iver which all trains from western crisis until cold weather is He can wait and see what Philip head of the CIO Berlin must move into the has been disrupted for more than have estimated it may run be tween and unless government spend ing is Bosone Backs Hoover Plan 30 Firstyear house Democrats have been asked to get behind the gov ernment reorganization plans pro and the United gets out of Steel and other steel makers in negotiations now under Utah made the suggestion Thurs to Berlin railroad Further delay was caxised by what the railroad management said was necessary reconditioning of the j In instituting their new block the Russians first stopped 160 trucks bringing food into the diverted many of them to the viet sector and forced the drivers I JjjJli f 13VC1 to sell the cargoes for Sovieti J Need Soviet Passes Secondly they announced tfiat starting Friday all food trucks bound for the city for the west passes at the Helmstedt check Girl Who Shot iFoimd Insane Picture on page 2 June 30 the 79 party point where the high speed auto mobile road enters the Soviet oc got a thrill out of see ner ido1 in colirt the British i lhen turnefi Slljm when she heard herself adjudged day in letters I Teel that we new members j cupation zone from can do much lo assure that these plans are put into she Thirdly they established road blocks at crossing points be Most of us have not been in tween the western sectors of Ber gross longenough to form special lin and the Soviet sector and attachments in any bureau or searched vehicles and pedestrians parlment or to become more deep to keep Soviet zone farmers from ly interested in the work of one j selling food in the western part bureau as opposed to that of cf the other bureau doing a similar j George j The enljrc proccsg look I she that if we i American commander in j 8n hour and a conference that reaches he had never rejected such a the government clef as contended by the elder states icit for the year Thursday because none had been rebe jarge pnough to warrant Higher ceivea from the National The president suggested ity Resources Yearling his vetoes of taxreduction Truman said his press secrebills passed by the 80th June 30 Arthur Watkinft voted for the second find last part of the labor bill spon sored by El bert Utah voted against the On hill to keep basic principles of he TaftH a r 11 e y Watkins voted for and Thomas against the Charles amply an swered the Baruch charges Ross told newsmen that Baruch was badly He added that the resources n f under Acting Chairman John I flirt a presidential is keeping mobilization plans tintiously up to I vpv Truman also brushed off v MJ with no comment questions seekj ing his reaction to an attack on his July 1 Friday NYT domestic legislative program by longcontroversy between another former former j Sir Stafford Cripps and United vote a change in the free speech amendment offered by Republi can Raymond Baldwin of This in per mits the National Labor Relations board to set aside a collective bar gaining election it an employer takes an undue part in preelection The free speech gtiar antee to would apply only in unfair labor practice Reject Then also by voice the senate rejected an amendment by Hugh Butler which of State James Byrnes j States officials over giving a more have extendeo the provisions In a speech at Washington and pattern to European f the to Hall a Lee university June Byrnes trade was settled at 2 said the trend of tome proposed day when a compromise was ac legislation was toward a welfare cepted by the chancellor of the of lhe d on the b The first of the two major votes British Ambassador jtufe No was all the pres Averell Harriman and adtd to Vice Alben With unprecedented legal speed ijdent would When reporter plan presiriinir remarked that e was riven a preliminary hearasked if he saw any connection bei Cripps finally abandoned his Lh Oj the only part of the adrmnistra ing on an assault she was tween the Baruch and Byrnes stand against any transfer of dolI Thomas oil that was left indicted formally by a grand he told his questioner lar aid from one creditor country fhe fjrjtrilne ijnes she was found insane by a and his own to j gfin Eioert D The that he wanted Alger Hiss to re sign M president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace after Communist charges against were aired last sum The testimony of Dullas contra dicted Hiss own story earlier this board chairman of the took the witness stand after Hiss1 defense on perjury charges ended with a final vain effort lo question the mental back ground of his chief Whit taker Last Tuesday Hiss acknowl edged talking to Dulles during a congressional inquiry into Hiss al leged communist And did he Dulles ask you out of consideration for the en dowment to voluntarily resign as president Hiss was asked Tues He replied He did AS a government rebut tal said Thursday that last August he asked Hiss to re sign the a year job to relieve the endowment of any The witness said Hiss agreed 3nd suggested offering his reigna tion in Dulle said he agreed with Hiss that he should not resign while under fire from the house un American activities Hiss resignation went before the post early this Dulles also is a delegate to the United Nations and a Re publican foreign policy But Judge fteevesi 75yeardld visiting jurist from Kansar said he intends to sentence Miss Coplon Miss a Barnard col lege girl who graduated with top honors and then became a aycar political analyst in the Jus tice department in ii under a total of Second Trial Her second trial is scheduled to start in New York on July with her purported Russian Valentine a for mer United Gubitchev is now free under bail posted by the Russian If convicted in New Misa Coplon would face possible maxi mum sentence of 35 years in prison and and above the top penalty ol 13 and on her conviction Thurs Coprosecutor Raymond Whearty told newsmen We defi nitely intend to try the New York Spectators in the densly crowd ed federal courtroom were hushed and tense with excitement as jury of eight men and four women six filing in at Appeared Nervous whose selfposses sion has featured the 10week appeared extremely nervous for the first She whispered something to Defense Pal and he threw a comforting arm around her shoulder as they entered the courtroom at she was sent to a mental instituj To other Truman had this to say Only An Hour er sen Elbert D Thomas D the defense wound up I after long minutes of Smaller Degree sponsor rf the administra1 fSht in Hiss bchalf by clockticking a deputy In Harriman agreed to i tion suggested that Dr Carl a marshal cried the defendant to the j will rise and Miss a tiny can continue to our objeci said in Frankfurt that the So regardless of whose toes viet demand for special passes are trampled can be a force i for trucks was in violation of the will be most effective in StatesBritishFrench ryineout the reorganization proi Russian agreement to end the Berlin CONTROL METHODS SPREAD Population Bureau Reports Revolution in Birth Rates June 30 UP with five years of gram The population reference I mar school education star for the The census bureau re Philadelphia came to court in a wheelchair to testify against He told briefly how she lured him to her hotel room the night of June 14 with a note saying she had a matter of importance to dis then fired a rifle bullet into his The who said she waa madly infatuated with Waitkus and had planned to kill him and commit suicide for two was taken before Felony Judge Mathew Hartigan on the assault Murder Intent Kartigan set bond at and ordered her held the grand A few minutes later the grand hailing what it called a revoluj porUd meaniime thal th nalionS tion in American birth said j population has increased almost i jury returned its indictment charg Thursday that birth control isjJ39r since the last census nine ing assault with intent to com aprtading rapidly among the lowyears The estimated total on cr education May 1 wax compared States John Boyle then In it this niny mean with in took the intlirtment to a that welleducated families The figures included the armed petit jury of six men and sb wom have the same number of forces The bureau snid en in The children ns the less educated a the population inneased after hearing a psychiatric situation making for a better induring the first four months of found her formed ithis the same rate Miss who said ahf In said the reproduction rale of j for the first months last Inevpr had met until the i increased M j The reference bureau called birth night shot him in the awank j onefourth of the hrtween 1P10 iinrt compared control the salvation cf Edpewatcr Reach bowed her President Sign StopGap Emergency Aid June 30 VPi A houseadopted stopgap bill providing emergency funds to keep many government agen cies operating legally after mid night won senate approval Thursday and was promptly signed by Karry S Tru It will allow agencies for which annual appropriations not been passed to con tinue spending for one month at the lowest rate approved by the senate or the presi dents the veterans ad ministration said half a million World 17 veterans schools and colleges are to have to wait R few daysj their June subsistence chefi The agency said a tempo shortage in is halting payments to Copyrlpht by Tlmri ANTITRUST ACTION to Paul ecoithat was true the bill should be jnomic cooperation jnamed after the current labor aw j far smaller degree of transfer of j management relations credits and dollars than EC A had originally and he dropped the S proposal that a part of the unused European cred its be convertible into British officials said Cripps had been able to accept the compro mise because it greatly diminished the risk of loss of dollars or gold j by Britain which he had thought involved the original pro Compromise Accord The agreement was a compro mise between two economic j doctrine of I free enterprise as applied in in ternational and the British labor government doctrine of a planned economy with planned ex ports and imports by bilateral ar Federal Judge Samuel figure in a trim greenplaid Kaufman refused to let rose stiffly to BiTiger offer an opinion on Cham bers mental Have you reached a verdict See Page Column 4 Sues du Pont Empire June 30 government sought to strip the vast du Pont industrial empire of its controlling interest in Gen eral Motors and the Rubber Thursday In the most far reaching civil antitrust suit ever In Tom Clark said the trust busting suit ranppmenls with foreign governwas aimed at breaking up the na an mcrem of only 29 for j head whtn iht heard trans in the veterans f jtions largest single concentrn clash of these two tion of industrial represented by Harri The government charged in its id fripps in prolonged suit that the three industrial r a payments agreegiants in 1917 held combined assets lo split the of The suit said Marshall plan council their combined sales totaled acrorrlinfr to some for and that trials to divide itheir combined net after into two of totaled financial TUt mil charged that iht three firms conspired to violate antitrust and asked that du Pont be forced to sell all its stock in Gen eral It also asked that members of the fabulous du Pont family be made to sell all its stock in Experts said iiuch a wholesale disposal of stock could have sharp repercussions on the stock mar and that many big and would he stock in all three com panies was steady to firm on the New York stock exchange Thurs despite the governments ac The filed in district court said du owns 23 of the Genera Motors the rest being divided among 000 Members of the du Pont family own 17 of the Rubber the suit with the remainder split up among sharehold The suit said this division of shares gives du Pont control of both General Motors and In addition to the three big the suit named as de fendants 125 memben of the du Pont and the Christiana Securities and the Delaware Realty and Investment scribed as the personal holding companies of the du Pont The principal defendants among family members were La ment and all of whom directors of du Pont the sprawling chemicn and firm which Alleged ly gained control of tht otlwr   

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