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Salt Lake Tribune: Saturday, May 7, 1949 - Page 1

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   Salt Lake Tribune, The (Newspaper) - May 7, 1949, Salt Lake City, Utah                                RADIO NEWS am am pn Intermountaln Network Station KALL Monday Tliroush Friday WEATHER Fair and warmer Saturday OB Page VOL 159 NO 23 SALT LAKE CITY UTAH SATURDAY MORNING MAY 7 1949 PRICE FIVE CENTS Ford Fires 14 UAW Aids Widens Rift Dearborn Refuses To Reinforce Policy of Pickets DETROIT May 6 Ford Motor Co shut down by a strike of its 60000 production workers announced Friday the firing of 14 unionists Sound trucks carried news of the discharges to sweltering pickets at the plant gates Meantime Dearborn city offi cials turned down a Ford request for more police protection at the plant gates The company pro tested pickets were massing there No Gates Blocked Dearborn Mayor Orville L Hub bard said no factory gates are blocked Anyone who wants to can walk right in Hubbard said Late Friday night Mayor Hub bard invited Ford company and union officials to meet with him May 1 to attempt to end the strike The firings stemmed from wild cat walkouts preceding the gen eral strike Thursday and included four CIO United Auto Workers committeemen Among them was Chairman Mike Donnelly of the unions unit in the B building center of the speedup dispute An estimated 5000 pickets pa raded peacefully around the plants 10 gates as word of the firings spread There was no irnmedia comment from the union Tied to Stoppage Ford attributed 11 of the dis missals including Donnellys to a briefstoppage at the plant lasti Friday The walkout began as a j A special international union com ofJIl rnittee arrived to investigate j U A W local 600s charge of speedI The partially clad body of a j been dead two or three days up on the assembly lines INGLEWOOD Cal May 6 i 61yearold Salt Lake man was They fixed his age at 61 As a result the toplevel union ruins and twisted Friday in Little Cotton Tne two Hnnsen committee was forced to postpone its investigation to Monday and Ford sent 1500 workers home i About 62000 of the 65000 establishment Fnday a few hours sed th beief strikers walked out of the sprawl af er a disastrous fjr swept the ing Rouge plant at noon Thursday coioriui traCK s grandstand Here is the scene wiiere a mans body found Friday by two 14ypiirold boys The man has been identified by officers as Levi fierce Delk Loft to right are Lowell McAllister Ray Forbtish Don Tracy Arthur E Allen All but Sir Forbnsh who lives near the scene are deputy sheriffs s Firemen Rake iM1SHAP OR MURDER Track Ruin S L Canyon Yields Body With Fractured Skull Mn Herman irders were all that remained of i onri jnvMtipaHnp i wood creek anc imesugaung bait jHansen and Clifford Duncan son iarns swaim racing Lake county deputy sheriffs exj of Mr and Mrs Wilford Duncan The others left their posts simul taneously at the companys Lin colnMercury plant Ford has said that virtually all Its 106000 production workers would be idled within two to nine days by the shutdown of the key Roiig plant So far however no other plant closings or layoffs have been announced Until news of the 14 firings was spread sound trucks had confined their rallying voices to urging good occa sional attack on some Ford offi cial The temperature stood at 90 i clubhouse The structure gleam ing with fresh paint in prepara tion for the opening of its summer meeting in 10 days was almost totally destroyed by the 40mimite fire that broke out a few minutes before midnight Estimates for its replacement run as high as 000000 Possibility of Arson The possibility of arson was ad the man had met with foul play Identified by officers as Levi j Pierce Delk the victim was found by two boys on the north bank of the creek approximate ly 100 feet below a bridge which spans the creek near 80th South and 20th East His skull had been fractured by a heavy blow Officers estimated the man had Texas Twister Trio were ire broke Prcs Waiter Reuther charged that Ford seeking a corn driving away out but they both of Butlerville were return ing home from May day exercises of Union junior high school about 5 pm Leaving their bicycles at the bridge the boys had started down the creek when they discovered the body partially submerged in water Discovered Wound They called Mr Hansen at his home less than a mile away He drove to the scene and called Salt Lake office by telephone It was believed at first the man had drowned but sheriffs deputies examining the body Dis covered the man had a fractured skull believed caused by a blow j from a sharp instrument An examination disclosed a Trains to Roll for Berlin On Schedule Clay Vows U S Proposes More Power For Jap Heads WASHINGTON May 6 i United States Friday proposed giving the Japanese government more power over its internationaT relations as a step toward re storing Japan eventually to the family of nations A formal State department policy declaration said that if Japan is given limited responsi bilities in several international fields it would speed the defeated countrys economic recovery and help prepare it for the end of the occupation Fields Suggested The specific fields suggested in cluded trade promotion citizen ship and property problems cul tural relations and technical and scientific arrangements and ex changes This further unfolding of Amer ican policy came in an explanation of a new State department pro posal to the 11nation far eastern commission The United States urged that the Japanese be au thorized to take part in interna tional conferences provided Gen Douglas A MacArthur approved Already Acting Already MacArthur as su preme allied commander is turn ing over to the Japanese govern ment increasing responsibility for domestic affairs MacArthur this week promised the Japanese a further relaxation of controls and said only world tensions stood in the way of a peace treaty and a wind up of the occupation The commission meanwhile pub lished a new policy directive giv ing its general indorsement to measures MacArthur and the Jap anese government have followed in reforming the ancient system of land ownership and tenancy The indorsement lacked the ap proval of Soviet Russia con tinual critic of American occu pation policies Russias repre sentative abstained from voting when the directive was approved April 28 i nt crnoers nau not cooiea DC L charged that Ford seeking acornfore ans were rushed to switch An examination disclosed a petitive advantage has orced lhe mceti to g t nit i LUBBOCK Tex May seVeninch laceration across the workers to step up production to track r R The three persons were killed and ibase of the skullj wnich had frac make way for any lost time caused V racingboard indi were reported injured early tured the reported Murray Ti i rr n r wnen a mrnnnn i l other lacerations one on the fore requirccl to won 100 iiaru JL The fjre jn an elevator i ineaa ana another under the chin said it actually had better thansnart lo the ornate dircc A1 ambulances from Jud AUcn Sjlld thgre were fgw 11r surplus of man power when tors lounge in the turf club t Brownueld wereibrujses mdjcaUng tho body had the strike was called Watchman Joseph Cohan le not been carried downstream any ered the flames and put in the M Fite Sundown school teacher distance alarm but the freshlvnaintiri said at east Jlomes were de ASite Locations Hearing Set I i I rrji ijijijrt JT iJijui1 viwm wo luuuu i worm war anc Aiian jo WASHINGTON May 6 CP extinguishthe fire First the kilcd t ed he I Qf the The western government is the first real government in Germany since Adolf Hitler escaped the hangmans noose by killing himself in a bunker of his Berlin Rcichs chancellery April 30 1945 Second Stage The 70man assembly approved the constitution on its decisive second stage The final stage will be carried out Sunday The two Communist assembly men voted against the constitu tion Fifteent other members in cluding eight from strongly states rights Bavaria three Christian Democrats and four representa tives of splinter parties abstained In approving the constitution the assembly despite allied disap proval insisted that the western sectors of Berlin be covered by it The western allies believe such ac tion to be premature and are pre paring to formalize the German government in their Berlin sec Former supreme court justice i tors when the constitution for Owen J Roberts Friday called the j western Germany becomes effec North Atlantic Defense pact an tive essential emergency measure to prevent an attack by Soviet Rus sia Roberts Lauds West Pact As Russ Bar WASHINGTON May 6 Gen Lucius D Clay Pledftrs Berlin rail start May 11 BONN Germany May 6 UP German constituent assem bly set up a government for west ern Germany Friday night with Communists excluded and ap proved a constitution for the west ern German state by 47 votes to 2 An 18man executive committee was elected to operate as a gov ernment until a format govern ment is set up under the constitu tion Direct Action Slated Despite Confusion Russ Silence By DREW BERLIN May trains will start for Berlin at midnight of Wednesday May 11 for the western sectors of Berlin Gen Lucius D Clay the United Slates military governor an nounced Friday No liaison has been established as yet between the western powers and the Soviet military administration in the city Gen Clay said adding I do not believe any are necessary We will put in our trains for clearance on the date agreed upon just as we did before the blockade These statements by the United States military governor arc the only clear indication in either American or British military government circles of what will actually happen when on May 12 the blockade of Berlin is lifted The most charitable explanation of the confusion and inde cision which appears to reign in the technical departments of the British and the American military governments for Berlin is that the problem of a raising of the blockade has overwhelmed the officials concerned There is a great deal of talkof technical difficulties and future consultation But no progress has been made toward even so elementary a matter as the drawing up a list of priorities for supplies to be brought into Berlin by rail canal and highway once the blockade is lifted It seems from statements made Friday by both British and Ameri can officials that a major share of the arrangements on railroad traf West Reich Blueprint Okehed Sans Reds freshlypainted I molished a Church of Christ church and parsonage blown away and numerous other buildings structure was doomed Fought Futile Battle Tongues of flame shot up to the j heavily damaged roof as dozens of fire companies j Identified Dead roared up and began a futile bat Jnierlm Regime Others who joined him in in dorsing the 12nation security treaty in testimony before ttfe senate foreign relations committee included Western Germanys interim gov ernment will function under allied Drape Tangled In Feet When found the victim was not wearing any trousers or socks although a suit coat shirt union suit and oxfords were intact A monks cloth drape was found world war and Allan B Kline Charles P Taft Cincinnati law yer and former state department official James W Gerard who was ambassador to Germany just before the outbreak of the first set up after elections to be held probably iaLe in July But the allies already preparing to turn over control of their occupation zones to civilians instead of commanders in chief will interfere as little as possible with German administration The temporary government was elected from members of the con stituent assembly It consists of seven men each of powered to install such a govern ment NonCommunist parties steam rollered the lone two Communist assemblymen and decided to start the new governmentfunctioning on Monday The main committee of the as sembly was ordered to select Sat urday the site of the west German capital It was disclosed in Berlin that by authority of the western com manders in chief the western gov ernment when it is formally set up will have a federal police force the first in Germany since the war V A to Reduce 23 States Staff by 8000 WASHINGTON May 6 The veterans administration Fri day is going to fire 8000 employes Monday and may have to let an other 7000 or 8000 go later this summer Offices lo be closed include those at Price Utah Elko Nev and Laramie and Rock Springs Wyo Next weeks discharge V A explained result from a volun tary slash the agency took in its budget estimate for the 194950 fiscal year It said that more firings may prove necessary if an additional 528000000 reduction voted by the nouse is approved by the senate The house voted to give the agency 1x5145431940 fie into and out of Berlin will be left to German officials of the So viet zone railroad administration No Orders Issued No orders have been issued eith er by the military governor or by the authorities inWashington to the United States office of the military government in Berlin on procedure to be followed when the blockade is lifted it was learned authoritatively Friday night Everyone agrees with Gen Clay that the first trains mustroll when the blockade is lifted But no has decided what they will carry Berlins primary need is coal Brig Gen Frank L Howley the United commandant nald Friday night Gen Howley de clared that the western zectors ot the city need million of tons of coal before they can feel safe Build Coal Stocks The AngloAmerican airlift hopes to increase stock piles of coal in the western sectors by 250000 tons in three months after the ending of the blockade an ob jective which still leaves the bur den of supply upon the railroads The British are asking for an immediate import of fresh vege tables especially potatoes into the city Mayor Ernest Rsuter and the city government of the western sectors back this project and want to hoid an official celebration when the first trainload of fresh food reaches the city These plans are not welcomed by the United States military gov ernment Its officers feel that any enthusiastic reception of such sup The flames were visible a dozen Scott s wife and oneyearold I charge War I were reported undergoing CQat pocket hospital m h e certificates from World were found in the inside on selection of a site for the west ern atomic reactor plant i miles away and airplanes circling Officials of the Detroit engineer nearby Los Angeles municipal son w in firm of Smith Hinchman and1 airport said they looked like the j surgery m Dupree Grills are to testify The firm was eruption of a volcano Levelland I cniploved last winter to study posi Quartered at the track were 550 Joe Walker Gulf Oil Co em sible sites for the new 5500000000 thoroughbreds reactor station It recommended iff of the meeting location of the plant at Arco Ida horses were not endangered by i i that address old officers the Montana officials protested this the fiames which never ap The national guard from Level family M r Delias home J nri Rorl Cross units from Lub1 y vir ueik s nome the major Socialist and Christian Bureau federation Favor Treatv I Democrat parties two Liberal Gerard said he had polled a I Democrats and one man each of group of fellow exambassadors j the German and Center parties of fellow i and reported that 22 of them told i The two Communists in the as e rac were e h u altOUrh he at one awaiting the opon1 ployc said there were unconfirmed u jd 375020th East eting May 17 The reports that several victims were j me who not endangered by still in the debris e papers found gave officers him they favor the treaty He j sernbly bitterly opposed the for es to the present address of said a 23rd Ogden K Hammond mation of an executive committee I of New York replied Am not in to start the western German state plifiS WOUid teiiu to Weaken u Carl R Gray Jr veterans of the principal ministrator said none of the hospital or other medical facilities will be cut The customary 30 day notice will be given to all the employes who are to be discharged iftj allied weapon against the AngloAmerican airlift Lift Sufficient1 For six months we have been saying and rightly that the air One effect of the reduction order ift can suppiy western Berlin will be to close 42 of the 468 one1 one American official said Friday andtwoman contact offices j njght The trend of German Those to be closed are in 23 states j officjai pians for a lifting of the Approximately 50 employes of the Salt Lake veterans adminis tration office will be affected by cuts in V A personnel E A Littlefield regional director said Friday blockade is to show that the west ern sectors in dire straits and were only delivered from dis aster by the lifting of the block ade This just is not true From all this it can be seen that the lifting of the blockade has j I LIlttL UlC ili favor but think it necessary going at once j He said the Price office would presented the western authorities Gerard also quoted former am This 1s nothing but a fullbe closed with more complex problems than bassador J Reuben Clark as re fledged government Communist Employes to be dismissed will lhose tney become accustomed plying no to a query about DePuly Max Reimann shouted begin receiving notices of termmajto durinr the last 11 months wnpthpr hp fflvorq thp troatv The Bonn assembly is not emtion Monday ssid Mr Littlefield copyright by NT T Times U S Employment Officer Sees 60 Million in Jobs by June preceded the lornado j Conflicting reports were wade j inn tho direction the tornado waai traveling There were no reports of other 1 towns being struck Communication lines to Morton about 60 rniles northwest of here BACKED BY ARTILLERY See Page 4 Column 3 Elephant Stomps On 1 WASHINGTON May 6 UP Robert C Goodwin director of the U S Employment service said Friday that 60000000 persons will have jobs this summer because of a substantial rise in employment expected by June But the rise will not be enough lo bring unemployment down Lo last years exceptionally low lev els he added The peak employment figures probably will be well below last years record of 61600000 but iflatively high in comparison with olher years he said The United Electrical Workers C 1 O said April figures the governments on unemployment apain understated the number of jobless by 1500000 and show that as yet there hss hern no spring pickup in industrial em ployment These figures indicate that awere nut 8nd ii was impossible toj serious situation is developing in contact several other nearby the failure of private industry to provide work both for persons who j had jobs at this time last year and those now entering the labor j force for the first time the union 2000 It is in the Hockley towns 3000 Population Sundown has population of said I county oil field It said the governments esti The tornado came out of a huge mate of 3016000 unemployed in thunderstorm area about 60 miles March is 1500000 too low because it does not include persons tem porarily laid off those obtaining north and west of Lubbock File said definitely it was a tornado and not a heavy wind only a few hours work or those storm otherwise on the fringe of the The Bruce furniture truck firm labor market and warehouse was one of ths re The census bureau said employ portedly demolished places ment in March was 57819000 i Scotts body was taken to the crushed him Goodwin snid there would be anenrby Lnvclland funeral home further increase of 1500000 in Lubbock had heavy electrical dis agricultural and several hundred turbances thousand workers added in other A tornado Thursday night cut industries by June That would 2mile swath southesst of Dahsrt bring the total in jobs to or in Mie rich wheatlands of the Texas LOGANSPORT Incl May 6 angry elephant tossed her veteran trainer high into the air Friday and stepped on him when he fell to the ground The trainer Singh Arumia 22 who came from India 12 years ago with Hank a female ele phant was injured seriously Witnesses said Hank knocked Arumia down wrapped her trunk around him and threw him into the air Then she stepped on the trainer and i whether he favors the treaty Gerard said Clark told him at best it was just another pact Roberts appeared in his capacity I as president of the Atlantic Union committee which wants a fcdera tion of democracies Ho told the committee that delay by the sen ate in ratifying the treaty will encourage Russia and damage our prestige throughout the world Damper on Aggression j Communists are vell aware c Saturday said that the pact puts a dam j per on Soviet aggression Sen Forrest Donncll R Mo Reds Push Toward Shanghai SHANGHAI Saturday May 7 Pi Communist troops backed by artillery pushed toward Shanghai While the Communists seemed mean business on this front about 50 miles from nervous asked whether the president of the Shanghai it still was difficult to United States would have the power under the pact to meet an tell whether they were starting a drive to capture the city i attack on Norway as he would I They also were attacking due for example on Charleston S C j west of Shanghai Roberts said a domestic inva Far to the southwest other Com sion would be quite different from munist troops cut across the last over 80000000 Panhandle Arumii was taken to St Josephs hospital in serious con dition after other trainers run up with sledge hammers and axes and subdued the nlrphant The elephant brlonged to the Dailey Brothers circus a foreign invasion and congress would have time to meet and de termine what action to take if a pact member is attacked eastwest railway in Nationalist China They were menacing Nanchang sprawling capital of kiangsi pro Taft who is a brother of REi virce Dispatches to two Shang publican Sen Robert A Taft cf i hai papers said Nanchang was in i Ohio told the committee there i a state of siege Most shops were 1 must be no domestic policies at j closed the governments central the White House which even bank wps suspended and bus vaguely pffects our relation to Rus traffic was halted isia not even Israeli and the1 Xanchang is halfway from 1 Arabs Shanghai to Canton the provi sional capital of fouth China It guards the southeast flank of Hankow the big fortified city of central China Red troops so far have been reported no closer than 52 miles from the On the Shanghai front the fate of the key city of Kashing was in doubt The Shanghai garrison said fighting ranged north and west of Knshing which is 50 rail miles southwest of Shanghai The garrison admitted the loss of Pingwang 17 miles northwest of Knshing It said 5000 Reds seized the city in nn advance cov ered by an artillery barrage A group of newsmen who reached a point near Kashing re ported on their return Friday night that the Nationalists had blown all highway bridges from Kashing to a ferry point on the Whangpoo to the north They had to abandon their au tomobile wade rivers and walk the nearly 50 miles back to Shang hai The Communists also launched an attack only a mile from Kun shan which is 35 miles due west of Shanghai The garrison said the Reds were bringing up rein forcements in this sector There was less news from the critical central China front The Reds main southward push drove in Yushan Shangjao find lyang over a 60mile stretch of the railway that runs from the sea at HangcJiow westward to Changsha At Changsha 275 miles west of the reported Red positions the line connects with HankowCanton the northsouth railway It is down that line that Gen Pal Chrmghsis 200000mim Hankow Nationalist garrison might re treat south   

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