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Salt Lake Tribune: Thursday, May 5, 1949 - Page 1

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   Salt Lake Tribune, The (Newspaper) - May 5, 1949, Salt Lake City, Utah                                RADIO NEWS 1C am pm Intermountain Network Station KALL Monday Xhroujh Fridav WEATHER Partly cloudy warmer Showers in southeast Details on Page 35 VOL 159 NO 21 SALT LAKE CITY UTAH THURSDAY MORNING MAY 5 1949 PRICE FIVE CENTS Wood Labor BillBackers Fos C1 1 TT Rate Issue Shelved in House Geneva Told Administration Speeds Substitute Opens New TH Repeal Drive ICC Hearing Debates Approval of Steel Freight Schedules WASHINGTON May 4 leaders opened a new drive to repeal the TaftHartley act Wednesday j WASHINGTON May 4 soon after the house shelved the Wood bill which would have Opponents of freight rates reenacted the law in almost everythingexcept name i established tentatively two The Wood bill was sponsored by a Republicansouthern I years ago to Pacific coast BULLETIN 1IIL AIR FORCE BASK May air force C47 crashed and burned during take off here Thursday at am Vo onraboard Ihe craft escaped Democratic coalition which had blocked house action on the ad ministrations compromise re pealer Reorganising their forces quickj ly Speaker Sam Rayburn and i Chairman John Lesinski D j Hich announced that the house j labor committee will start work j almost immediately on a new com promise repeal bill which the en tire DemowaUc party can sup port Sent to Committee statement was made after the house by the narrow vote of 212 to 209 sent the Wood bill back to the labor committee for fur ther study The roll call found 18 Republi cans 193 Democrats and Mar cantonio voting to return the Wood bill to committee Opposed were 147 Republicans and 62 Democrats mostly southerners Rayburn picked up 11 southern votes overnight We are going to start working out a new bill sometime next week and possibly even earlier Lesin ski said I think we can have j something on the floor again within four weeks Lesinski said the VJ1 start with the compromise John Foster Dulles told the senate West Powers Russians Agree To End Blockade on May 12 I cities for the Geneva Utah Steel Co complained Wednes day that supporters of the schedule are confusing the I issue 1 Arguments on final approval of the rates are being heard by the Interstate Commerce com Supporters of the rales were ac The plane assigned to mill jcused by Joseph G Cooper of Beth tarv 1730th air transport group ehcm Co of dragging into was believed to have only two per sons aboard It was based at Mc Clellan field Sacramento Cal Destination of the craft was not determined Hill Field public relations of fice said no further information would be available until the home field could be contacted Thursday the argument issues on the devel opment of a western industrial economy that only serve to befog the discussion Urges Rate Defeat Hesaid Bethlehem is very much interested in the western market and urged that the rates be disapproved to establish a com petitive situation Bethlehem oper ates a plant at Seattle Earlier Thomas F Lynch of Geneva steel had told the commis sion that none of the objecting producers competes with his com pany on the basis of heavy steei shapes and plates which are the only products of the Utah plant Coopers position was supported by Albert L Vogl of Colorado Fuel and Iron Co Striking Average Vogl a veteran Colorado rate expert drew a chuckle from com mission members when he said attempting to discuss the economic future of the west and the techni house would not accept the States refuses to join the North cal points of rate making was like administrations original repealer Atlantic Security pact trying to strike an average be Woulcl Repeal TH i The Republican foreign policy j twecn an elephant and a horse ert said that if this countrv We are not opposed to ment of the west he said j He told the commission he was not ready to say whether the Geneva rales should be extended lo Minnequa where the Colorado plant is located We expect he said to see the rates fairly adjusted They cannot be selected for the advan tage of one plant Held Steel Market Before the new western steel i plants were Gene War Probable Sans Pact Dulles Says committee WASHINGTON May 4 UP drafted by Democratic leaders in foreign re 1 a t i o n s committee a lastditch effort to woo southern Wednesday that war would be Democratic votes after they saw p highly probable if the United Holdup Efforts Paid OffLong Prison Terms Luman Ramsdale 23 second left and George L Ashtnn 20 second right arc led to federal court handcuffed to U S deputy marshals Har old Kidgely left and Fax Murphy right where they were sentenced tn 20 yrars imprisonment for Baltimore and Ohio train robbery in West Virginia Introduced by Rep Hugo S emidiales Ule treaty nowby re Sims D S Ct it would of tne ratify it repealed but retained fwestern European nations which the injunction and nonCommunist j the accord might also features which led labor leader cnange lheir plans lhus making to denounce it as a slave act Ue ikelv blcausc there The coalition aided by be no to Russian gruntled northern Democrats de expansion feated that compromise however and then went on to substitute June Vote Slated the Wood bill forthe administra tions version The senate is scheduled to vote The final vote on on ratification of the treaty some i time in June Hearings by the relations sommittee are ext I pected to last several more weeks WASHINGTON May 4 T Reps Walter K Granger and Keva Beck Bosone Utah Dem ocrats voted to send the Wood bill back to committee Dulles a U b delegate to the rai shipper of steel prod United Nations testified that ut i 1n Train Bandits Given 20 Years in Jail FAIRMONT W Va May 4 The bizarre holdup of a Baltimore and Ohio passenger train near Martinsburg brought 20 year sen rVogTlaidTwal iheltenccsLn fedfal j 65000 POISED Ford Company Walkout Looms as Talks Fail DETROIT May 4 UP No day We are meeting again progress was reported Wednesday night after an eleventh hour ITKL r VX i Pant Thursday at the unions request a Ford spokesman said A walkout at the key Rouge of alleged into 1ne under the pact the United States The commission was told by A should be able to cut overail mili the Wood bill was to have come tary spending even though it may Wednesday but the house shelved have to helP western European the measure instead I nations build up thenmilitary The paperthin margin by which establishments This could be the Wood bill was sent back to done he said bj Pooling re rommittee made it plain however sources with other that the administration will have i He also tola the committee that i to settle for far less than comi Russias lifting ot the Berlin plete repeal of the Republican labor law Meanwhile the TaftHartley law will remain on the books unless the labor committee can work out en acceptable compromise P Heiner that the Fontana plant was established by Henry J Kaiser interests because a favor See Page 2 Column 4 Injuction Clause Any successful repeal legisla blockade would rnark a change in I Soviet methods but not their in tcntions Help Remove Fears And that the pact and ac i cempanying arms aid program will I help remove European fears of I Russian aggression and that a I Hopes Ascend ion almost certainly will have to found for Germany j air bei d into mjnes bv I ventilation raised hopes Wed tion provide i to obtain court For Miners Sealed in Shaft GIRARDVILLE Pa May 4 drop in pressure from for Worker i an aU young Youngslown 0 men Wedj t t lo slavc off a strike atj nesday Fords big River Rouge plant The two Lunian Ramsdell 231 The 65000 Ford workers arel diistrial empire in a matter of and George L Ashton 20 were poised for a strike at noon Thurs given identical sentences whenday they appeared before Federal Judge Harry E Watkins The jurist before pronouncing sentence on Ashton said Sometimes crime is so shock ing to society that it outweighs the interest of the individual The futile session Wednesday darkened hopes of avoiding the The last minute at i walkout the strike was set for 9 am Thursj which if prolonged 133000 Ford Such A Case Airliner Rams Church 29 se I head off national emergency injunctions to j The Pact also was indorsed by i former Undersecretary of State day night that four miners trapped This is that kind of a caf Ashton told Judge Watkins thought the sentence was justi I 111 fiefi and added I expected to get more I He said he wanted to serve TURIN Italy May 4 UP mv sentenceand be the man everyairliner crashed into the steeple nnp Ihinkq 1 ran c t c i relations chief led their negotiat one i can Oj ancient Superga catnedral Ramsdell said that the invest1 Wednes hv rrnhstinn ffWr in 33 cities throughout the nation Union and company officials mot for two and one half hours The night session was called after la previously futile afternoon meet ling Rouge key plant in the Ford organization and one of the larg est in the country supplies parts j for the smaller assembly lines Walter P Reuther U A W presi dent declined a Ford invitation to attend the peace talks Emil An jMazey union secretarytreasurer and John S Bugas Ford industrial strikes and for nonCommunist William L Clayton He regarded 800 ft underground by fire might affidavits bv union officials and ift as a natural and necessary step I still be alive at least ol affidavits by union officials and management the word ot so nany witnesses toward a federal union of western j Four state mine inspectors what the general public tae ing teams gation by probation was i i Both sides remained firm as the largely similar to newspaperthe 31 persons believed aboard talks began The union charged stories and it was hard to dispute I The chartered triengine Fiatjancl tle company denied the recommittal action was a j Europe He testified as vice reeling rescue operations at the i lievfd negative victory for the adminis of the Atlantic Union Packer No S colliery of the n committee which seeks a lederal berton Mine Co said the pressure tration It did nothing to carry j out the campaign promises mado lnion of the north Atlantic dropped from 90 to Jo Ibs This to labor by PresKarryS Truman they said was a possible indica pnd the Democratic party plat 5 1 rlnrtfrnrl nf IVto otatCS Hg complicity in the holdup but denied any brutality The 20 year terms were im existence of a speedup which landing at Turin airport A wing tip caught on the steeple a land i safety of Rouge workers Bugas reiterated his companys to labor by Pres Harry sugpetcd ihe United j tion form Both pledged repeal of the ca a invention of ihe sealed thcmsclvrs off act and a return to pact snatones to see how far j dense smoke had Repeal legislation also is certain that the entombed men had I the Baltimore to Detroit from the bassndor Marrh tapped the I the maximum sentences posed tor He called UAW charges that it P1ine to tne ground m tnep ri ri 1rri f ii Ford had slowed its lines while a Hne and were breathing Oet Additional Trrms Recover iS Bodies Two hours after the crash no investigated and ithcn speeded them up Tuesday fabrication Foreign Ministers Parley On Other Issues May 23 NEW YORK May 4 Russia and the western powers agreed Wednesday to end the Berlin blockades May 12 and to discuss currency and other German issues at a council of foreign ministers meeting in Paris May 23 These decisions were reported in official and unofficial quarters here after envoys of the Soviet Union France Britain and the United States met behind RARY TO flANT closed doors for an hour and a half Airlift Scores Biggest Feat In Peace Act BERLIN May 4 allied airlift counted its greatest victory agreement by the Soviet Union to lift its Berlin blockade The dates were not officially an nounced but a source in touch with i the situation said they were agreed upon and will be announced in a i communique from the fourpower capitals Thursday at 8 am 7 am Agree on May 12 The British were said to urged the Russians to end their blockade May 9 with the western powers lifting their counterblock ade at the same time The Rus sians who originally wanted a date in June replied they could not do so because there was not The airlift grew from a baby to enough time to notify their local a giant in 10 months Twentyfive Americans and 22 Britons lost their lives flying food and coal to Berlin over the Rus sian roadblocks American taxpay commanders So May 12 finally was agreed upon The conference of the four power envoys was the first time ers spent more than SIHOOOOOOO a11 follr Powers had met on the to support it the British too spent millions Wednesday the planes flew on their pioits almost unmindful of Dietalks in New York Next week presumably they can cut down on their strange adventure and turn much the cargocarrying over lo railroads and trucks Russians Surprised But the political effects of the airlift are bound to be felt for a long time Some persons here credit it with stopping commun ism on the Spree river The Rus sians never expected tliat the west could feed a metropolis by air alone They forced the west to build and train probably the great est peacetime air force in history The Russians were not the only ones who doubted the airlift would work Some of the men in the western allies leadership felt same Created Last June One man convinced from the start that the idea would work was Gen Lucius D Clay U S commander in Europe The airlift was born on a hot Sunday afternoon last June The Russians had slammod on their See Page 9 Column G UNION NEARER Nations Ready To Sign Pact failed to find an answer last sum mer Porter McKeever American press officer issued a statement on behalf of all four powers tt said It can be said specifically that agreement has been reached and that al restrictions imposed on Germany which have been the subject of conversations will be mutually lifted Consider Other Issues After an interval a meeting of the council of foreign will held The council of for eign ministers will consider ques tions relating to Germany and problems arising out of the situa tion in Berlin including also question of currency Later McKeever said all detail had been arranged for this com munique to be issued Thursday This was taken here as meaning the onlything left was theofficial announcement settingthe dates Wednesdays conferees w e r Philip C Jessup for the United States Sir Alexander Cadogan for Britain Jakob A Malik for Soviet Union and Jean Chauvel for Wednesday Jessup received the representatives of the three other powers in the American U N delegation headquarters Chauvel Arrives First Jean Chauvel of France arrived first He was followed a lew min utes later by Sir Alexander Cado gan of Britain Malik and a secretaryinterpre ter joined them at pm and the conference was on They broke i up at 2 pm went to another room LONDON May 4 API Ten to bc photographed and then went nations will sign Thursday a back to thcir Off jces charter for a council of Europe Malik was asked if agreement a new move toward union ol oldtlad been reacnec He repijeci world democracies Almost That was the most Tne historic document brings i elaborate comment received from into being a council which in ef1 him since ne fae taikjng with feet will be a parliament of Euj jcssup peb 15 rope and a cabinet of Europe f will be the seventh session py i j Lino MI Hit OGVUIILJI The final draft was completed the counci of fore in a three hour meeting Tuesday fljr jn the of Wednesday the foreign ministers second wnrid war meet of Britain France meet the Netherlands Most nationals to leave appear Rescue Hopes Rise Hopes rose for the men trapped nd a CANTON May 4 i group of other Republicans will American and British of the TaftHartley law Canton and south China appear T d are Win R th tcrms Sen J Howard McGrathtR lo have adopted a wait and h Wowak 34 both o Ramsdell and Asht chairman of the Democratic naattitude A number interviewed robbery of a passenger Judge Watkins specified how stubborn srnoke obstacle that had j ever that the 10 year stymied their early efforts A Lincoln division strike was ithoriKed last week by the U A W also imposed on Ramsdell and aid board The ton on each of two rounts of armed vn e board withheld permission for the llicc had recovered 29 Additional in year terms were EtU tne for Belgium met to approve the draft i second world war j ing was i n to Dec 15 1947 At that time the nd 4fllnil ministers did not even agree on talk about and Gen i persons had been aboard The victims identified as four officials of the j l Rouge strike at that time and ap the committee to investi The Lincoln division strike ever inu uie Ju year sentences Turins cnamnionshin snerpr font Le ne Llncojn vision siruce be served with and not P Jalso followed speedup complaints tional committee said the Wood in Canton said there was no im bil was shelved because it did not mediate Communist threat to this fit his partys idea of a good bill i southern city previously pleaded three charges Senate Rejects 24State Limit Proposal on Education Bill ShciianrJoah and Raymond Eye 3fi and William OBrien 55 of Girardville Mine Tnspectors Joiin Erophy j Robert Schneider Frank Morgan and Thomas Ryan said they bei i lieved the men were entombed on i Tii I the third level of the fourlevel i colliery The fire they believeil j broke out on the second level and GLASGOW Scotland Women Perish jwax emitting the dense smoke that east 33 women were three to two hampered rescue work j killed Wednesday when fire raced j team club three Italian sportswrit paeh haders 1S footba11 to the cvcly regular member of the cham pionship team except one who was not the planes four crewmen Champion Team The soccer players Italian na ilionnl rhampions for four years iwere returning from Lisbon Portu gal where they had been defeated by a Portuguese Diplomatic sources said it wasj expected they would be taken into j the new council in time for them j to attend the first session in Strasbourg France this summer May WASHINGTON May 4 The bill provides allowances rang Oxygen masks protect the resj through fivestory department For soecerloving Italy the The senate Wednesday voted down ling from Sr to 29 per child cue workers but they are ore n less than five minutes and jcrash was a tragic 57 to 17 a proposal to cnnfinr pending on the states wealth lo see because of the dense smoke l spread to a movie theater and an able to the shock U S sports fans federal educational funds to 24 I But Tydings could muster the Tn overcome this firemen are Iny1 entire block of shops in the busi would fee if a major base states which need them support of only 11 Republicans ing down fog nozzles to dissipate district The chamber also refused by i and fi Democrats while 39 Demo the smoke voice vote to write a min crats and 18 Republicans voted imum salary requirement for i against him school teachers into the bill j Sen Joseph R McCarthy R Arm Rescue Teams The procedure was to arm the Sen Millard E Tydings D jWis proposed the teachers wage j rescue teams with a 2iin hose Md sponsored the first move I amendment He said thai salaries line that melted the smoke ei which would have pruned nearly for teachers were less than those jabling them to see at least five 100 million dollars from a bill earned by ditch diggers in many j feet ahead authorizing 300 millions a year for j states and were a main cause of I The fog nnzzlc approach wasjThcy estimated the death grants to the states for improvei educational deficiences in the na decider on after a plan to blow j might go as high as 20 The bodies of 13 women were recovered most of them employes of the dppnrtment store Two girls jumped to their death from fourth story windows as giant tongues of flamo swept through the store Police officials said they feared bodies were in the ruins toll I the smokti ant an air hole in the I Firemen were unable to reach ball team which had won three successive world scries was wiped out in one disaster Hundreds Hear Crash Frantic Turincse hundreds of whom had seen or heard the crash converged on the cathedral or called newspaper offices as word that the plane carried the prize football team spread through the citv Fifteen minutes after the crash ment of primary and secondary tion schools Son Elbert D Thomas D Isido of a mountain proved impracj the rear of the burning block de Tydings said the measure car1 Utah administration sponsor ofitical jspite oxygen masks and special every shop in downtown Turin had ries 24 states which have no need the measure declarer the amendj The deepest penetration before equipment ielosed Heavy police guards for government assistance in their j mrnl was out of harmony with Wednesday night was 6 fi some i The rause of Ihe j barred crowds from the hilltop systems The othcr 24 i the purpose of the bill herauv I filt short of where the men are woril in many not catherlial onrp the official need financial help he said Jit set up federal conditions for aid i believed trapped determined immediately church of the Italian royalty Quads Born to IV Y Exceed Par Only by One NEW YORK May 4 boys and two born in Lebanon hospital in the Bronx Wednesday to Mrs Ethel Collins 27 wife of a brokerage firm clerk Thn first child horn early in the afternoon was a boy who weighed four pounds A5 ounces second to arrive was a girl four pounds three ounces third was a boy five pounds five ounces and fourth was the second girl three pounds seven ounces The couple had expected triplets The four babies were put in incubators and attendants said night their condition was fine The mother and her husband Charles 29 live in a threeroom apartment in the Bronx They have one other child a boy years old The father said there had been no other multiple births in either family Altogether the two boys and two girla weighed 17 pounds 14 ounces Doctors said they all had a good chance of survival Atlrndanis at Lebanon hospital said quadruplets occur only once in 676000 births Kuss Start Blockade The Soviet Union shortly after i wards began its restrictions in Berlin and the western stepped up their moves to set up a western German government The Berlin blockade finally waa put on by the Russians last I IS The western powers quickly I retaliated with a counterblockade and with the airlift The airlift has cost about 50 American and British Jives and more than JOOOOOO from the U S treasury i The dispute was referred to the United Nations security council where the majority last Oct 25 i decided that Russia should end the i blockade and the foreign should meet Andrei Y Vishinsky i Soviet deputy foreign minister at i that time vetoed the resolution Now Vishinsky as foreign min ister has agreed to exactly that same course and will head his dele gation to the council in Paris Welcome Announcement Russia and the west tried to find ja solution this winter to the cur i vency problem but here again they disagreed and finally gave up I U N delegates welcomed j announcement Vladimir Houdek lot Czechoslovakia told reporters can lead to settlement of German problem and then to broader agreement for which all hope   

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