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   Salt Lake Tribune, The (Newspaper) - April 1, 1949, Salt Lake City, Utah                                RADIO NEWS aLI am pm InternuMintain Network Station KALL Monday Through Friday WEATHER Partly cloudy Friday showers south Details on Page S3 VOL 158 NO 169 SALT LAKE CITY UTAH FRIDAY MORNING APRIL 3 1949 PRICE FIVE CENTS Primary Leaders View Pacific Isle Souvenirs IDS Primary Assn general presidency examines souvenirs of Fa eific Islands one area whose people will be studied this summer Meets Slated Today Herald 119th LDS Conference FRIDAY PROGRAM 8 for stake board members and mission representatives Assembly hall 10 meetings at various locations 10 am to noon and to house Pri mary Childrens hospital 44 W North Temple 2 meetings at various locations 5 breaking foiproposed Primary Chil drens hospital llth ave and D st Left to right Mrs LaVern iW Parmley first counselor Mrs Adele Cannon Howells president Mrs Dessle G Boyle second counselor By JACK M REED Hea riding the 119th annual gen eral conference of the Church Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints which begins Sunday first aux iliary meetings will be conducted Friday opening1 day of the two day Primary Assn 43rd annual conference Highlight Friday will be the ground breaking ceremony at 5 pm for the proposed 70bed Pri maryChildrens hospital at llth ave and D st George Albert Smith church president who re turned Wednesday after recuperat ing in Los Angeles for two months following an illness has been in vited to turn the first shovel full of earth Other Participants Other participants at the ground breaking service will include Harold B Lee member of the council of twelve and Primary Assn adviser LeGrand Richards presiding bishop Joseph L Wirth lin first counselor in the presid ing bishopric Mrs Adele Cannon Howells Primary Assn general president and Mrs Frances G Bennett the hospital committee The present Primary Childrens hospital 44 W North Temple will hold open house Friday from 10 am to noon and from to Meetings Friday will include a general meeting for Primary Assn board members and mission representatives at 9 am in the Assembly hall Temple square de partmental meetings at 10 am and 2 pm in various meeting places throughout the city Friday Meetings Spencer W Kimball member of the council of twelve will speak at the 9 amsession The winter pro gramof the association will be discussed in departmental meet ings during the morning and the summer program will be con sidered during ths afternoon Mark E Petersen of the council of twelve will speak to the stake Primary Assn presidents at their 10 am meeting in the Assembly hall Primary Assn meetings Satur day will be open to all stake ward and mission Primary workers and the general public These are scheduled for 10 amand 2 pm in the tabernacle In addition Sat urdays schedule includes a testi mony meeting in the tabernacle a luncheon tor Primary Asan stake prosldenls and mission presi dents wives at noon in the Lion House social eenier 63 E South Temple and a reception and exsai Mbit at 7 pm m Hotel Utah I A special meeting concerning work with Indians in the missions of the church is scheduled Satur dsy at pm in the Assembly hall for stake ward and mission leaders Begin Busy Schedule Meanwhile a busy schedule for mission presidents and their wivss began Thursday Eight at a meet ingwith Primary Assn general board members A luncheon for mission presidents and their wives will be given by the Mutual Im provement Assns Friday noon in the Lion House social center Other such meetings will be held by the Deseret Sunday school union and Relief society General conference sessions will be held Sunday Monday and Wednesday at 10 am and 2 pm each day in the tabernacle General priesthood meeting is scheduled Monday at 7 pm a welfare meet ing Tuesday at 10 am and a ses sion called by the presiding bishopric Tuesday at 7 pm all in the tabernacle Semiannual conference of the Deseret Sunday school union is planned for Sunday at 7 pm in the tabernacle Truman Humor Delights US Safest Driver WASHINGTON March 31 and Mrs Martin Larson met Pres Harry S Tru man Thursday and received five pens for their five children Larson a 41yearold truck driver was named driver of the year because of his 18year record without an accident and for saving the life of a motorist during a Wisconsin snow storm The White House visit was among his rewards Mr Truman gave Larson five ball point pens one for each of his three sons and two daugh ters ages 11 to 16 Each pen bore the inscription I swiped this from Harry S Truman Cabbies Ready Strike in NY NEW YORK March 31 Mayor William ODwyer admit ted Thursday night that lasthour attempts to avert a taxicab strike had failed but warned in a radio speech that the entire police de partment had been alerted to make sure there is no rough house and no violence Th police department assigned 3000 men to guard safety lanes for nonstrikers in the face of charges that goons would Tie em ployed both by the taxi companies and by John L Lewis district 50 union which is attempting to or ganize New Yorks 11000cab industry The strike was set for am Friday It was also obvious that several thousand cabs would attempt to continue operating Rent Chief Assures Tenants Hike Will Not Be General WASHINGTON March 31 UP Director Tighe E Woods assured tenants Thursday that the new rent law which goes into effect Friday does not mean a general rent for all of them He hinted in fact that because of the paper work involved it may be some time before landlords get any increases under the new pro vision jriiaranteeing them a Vfair net operating income In his first public statement on the new act Woods agreed with Pres Harry S Truman that the law takenas a whole is a good one He said most of criticisms wei aimed at minor provisions or provisions which represent a new not necessarily approach to the problem of ad ministeringrent control fairly Discussing the provision for a fair net operating income to landlords Woods said it is sound from an administrative viewpoint Nor doesit mean a general rent increase for all tenants he said said ths of a fair net operating Income is a liberalization of the present law which permits rent increases if landlords can prove hardship While the law leaves it up to Woods to decide what is a fair net income he said the provision will take care particularly of any small landlords who feel that they have been treated unfairly It clearly does not involve any administratively unworkable plan of fair return on some valuation It is merely ri continuation of a trend in our adjustment provisions which has been taking place over the past two years he said A new regulation instructing local rent boards exactly how to determine what is a fair net operating return will be issued as soon as possible he added But first his staff will have to make a study of what has happened to landlords operating costs during the past eight years both before and under rent control That may take some weeks which means no increases can be granted under the provision until then Meantime landlords still can rent hikes under the present hardihip machinery Inflation Peril Still Near Truman WASHINGTON March si Inflation still is just around the corner Pres Harry S Truman con tended Thursday as he called ahiw for standby economic control pow ers and a big boost in taxes Some of his financial advisers have termed current price de creases a healthy thing pointing to continued prosperity on more stable levels But Mr Truman emphasized he still wants congress to pass his antiinflation pr9gram including powers to put ceilings on prices Letup Only Temporary He told a news conference that the recent price declines are only a temporary letup in the infla tionary pressures He said one factor in checking the upward spiral has been his oftrepeated re quest for authority to apply fed eral curbs when needed As for taxes the president said he does not agree with a conten tion by Sen Walter F George D Ga that an increase at this time might set off a depression It would be much more danger ous to the nations economy Mr Truman said for the government to run up a deiicit than to boost taxes Asks Levy Boost He 3iJ not mention any specific figure for the tax hike but pre viously he had asked congress to boost the levies to help meet budget requests and to make payments on the federal debt which now totals 000000 George who is chairman of the taxhandling senate finance com mittee told a reporter I dont think the president can get an increase in taxes out of congress now Two Republican senators quick ly backed Georges stand Sen Kenneth S Wherry GOP floor leader said he agreed with Mr Truman that the government ought to avoid a deficit but that the way to do it was to cut fed eral spending not to raise taxes Agrees With George Sen George W Malonft Nev said that he agreed with every word George has spoken about taxes He added that if taxes were an in tolerable level the Truman de pression will make us forget Mr Hoover Key Democratic senators mean while indicated that prospects also are dim for Mr Trumans antiinflation program Sen Joseph C OMahohey D Wyo said there can beno doubt that recent price decreases have reduced demand for controls As chairman of the joint senatehouse economic committee OMahoney previously had urged that con gress grant standby price and ra tioning powers I still think it would be wise to hsve the he told a reporter but chances probably very remote now Only Atom Bomb Deters Soviet Churchill Says Taylor Draws 180Day Jail Sentence Senator Plans Appeal Of Guilty Verdict By Alabama Jurors BIRMINGHAM Ala March 31 Alabama jury Thurs day night found Sen Glen Taylor D Ida guilty of disorderly con duct and sentenced him to 180 days at hard labor for his brush with Birmingham Jim Crow laws a year ago The jury also levied a fine against Taylor The prison sen tence and fine were the same that imposed in city court im mediately after Taylors arrest except that the jail stretch was suspended by the city judge Pleased Taylor said he was very pleased by the verdict and an nounced an immediate appeal to the Alabama court of appeals He hoped to make bond and catch a pm CST plane so he can be back In the senate Friday Taylors pleasure stemmed from the fact that he hopes to carry the issue all the way to the U S supreme court if necessary in a bid to havft the Birmingham segre gation declared unconstitu ional Taylor was arrested when Ja at empted to snter a Negro youth at Birmingham church via the door marked for Negroes only The city prosecutor sought to treat him as a routinr brawler vhile Taylors counsel pounded home the segregation issue in his defense Disregard Race Issue Circuit Lewis Bailes however he jury to disregard any segrega tion issue in reachingits verdict The allwhite allmale jury de liberated about an hour altogether after getting the case at pm The jurymen took an hour out for dinner armthe announcement of the verdict was delayed 39 minutes while court waited for Taylor to come backfrom own dinner Taylor who already had ap pealed his city court suspended jail sentence only to draw an actual sentence from the county conceiv ably could carry the case along another year or more After the state appeals court he has re course to the state supreme court then the U S supreme court Formally Affirmed The jurys sentence was form ally affirmed by Judge Bailes as the prisoner stood at the bar bit ing his lip Bailes said the fine would run to counting city court costs Taylor also was ordered to pay county court costs which would run to an estimated He would serve his jail sentence on the city work detail After the sentence was pro nounced Taylor signed an appeal bond which automatically stayed execution of his sentence His bail was fixed at The debonair young senator an Winston ChnrchlU Reiterates famed Fulton speech WAR NOT INEVITABLE unlit cigar dandling mouth shook hands from his with tlie judge city attorneys newspaper men and witnesses before he left to catch his plane DR W H DOW Plane Mishap Kills Tycoon LONDON Ont March 31 WP Chemical magnate Willard H Dow his wife and three other per sons crashed to their deaths in a plane Thursday on a storm soaked Canadian meadow The 52yearold president of the sprawling Dow Chemical Co one of the worlds largest was flying with his party to attend a gather ing in Boston Mass Struck by a lashing rain the pilot apparently was trying for an emergency landing in a field a mile from the London airport The plane hit a knoll bounced and crashed Within seconds it was aflame Dr Dow Mrs Martha Dow 51 Mrs Alta Campbell 44 pilot A J Bowie and copilot Fred Clem ents all of Midland Mich were believed killed instantly The only survivor was Campbells husband Calvin head o Dows IcRal department at the companys headquarters in Mid BOSTON March 31 UP of Winston Churchills speech Thursday night at the Bos ion garden It is certain thatEurope would have been communized and Lon don under bombardment some time ago but for the deterrent of the atomic bomb in the hands ofthe United States I do rot think myself that yio lent or precipitate action shouli be taken now Against the men ace of Soviet War is not Under the impact of communism all the free nations are beinj Soviets Protest Atlantic Pact In Note to US WASHINGTON March 31 A Russian protest against the north Atlantic treaty received at the State department here late Thursday It came as foreign J ministers from thenorth Atlantic region gathered to sign the pact next Monday The Russian note reached the State department late in the after nooni evidently about the time that Secy of State Dean Acheson was conferring with Netherlands Forr eign Minister D U Stikker and shortly after he had Held a two hour conference with British For eign Minister Ernest Bevin on Ger many Greece and other European questions Admit Receiving Note State department officials would say Thursday night only that the message had been received from the Soviet embassy here It was not delivered by Ambas sador Alexander S PanyushSin was sent around either by mes senger or by a diplomat of lesser rank Officials said that at the close of work Thursday the message wag being translated It apparent ly would not get any attention from Acheson or other top officials until Friday The statement of the Russian position however appeared mainly to be an official declaration to each of the seven governments which sponsored the treaty that Russia considers the pact a viola tion of Unuci Nations char ter and an aggressive document Scan German Future Earlier in the day Acheson and Bevin had started what may be a final and successful effort by the western powers to agree on plans for the future of western Germany The plans include creation of a separate German government In a twohour conference in Achesons office at the State de partment the foreign policy chiefs f America and Britain also re viewed the situation in Greece reek government troops with American help are preparing a major spring offensive against Communist guerillas At the end of their session Acheson went into another confer ence with Dutch D U Stikker who like Hevin has come here to sign theNorth At antic treaty next Monday tal of 12 natioM in the North At British Statesman Scathes Politburo in MIT Talk BOSTON March 31 Churchill said Thurs day night that Russia would have communused Europe time ago except for the atomic bomb which the United States possesses Addressing 13900 persons in the Boston garden Churchill said that the handful of men on the ruling Russian Communist Politburo aim to rule the world I must not conceal from you the truth as I see it 74yearold wartime British prime minister said It is certain that Europe would have been communized and London under bombardment some time ago but for the deterrent of the atomic bomb in the hands of the United States Fear Friendship of West Russia he said had united the free world against it by de liberate acts because the men in the Kremlin fear the ship of the west more than its hostility Thirteen men in the Kremlin holding down hundredsof millions of people and aiming at the rule of the world feel that at all costs they must keep up the barriers Churchill said Selfpreservation not for Russia but for themselves lies at the root and is the explanation of their sinister and malignant policy These 13 men in the Kremlin have their hierarchy and a churctt of Communist adepts whose mis sionaries are in every country as a fifth column awaitingthe day when they to be absolute masters of their fellowrcountry men They hava their antiGod re tigion behind this stands the largest army in the world hands of a government pursuing imperialist expansion as no czar Highlight of ChurehilFs Boston Garden Speech welded together as they never have been before and never coulc be but for the harsh extema pressure to which they are beinj subjected We seek nothing from Russia but good will and fair play We may well ask Why have they the Russians deliber ately acted to M to uRte vrazld against It Is becanM they fear the f rieadihtp of the more than Its Thirteen in the kremlin holding down hundreds of million of people and aiming at the rill of the world feel that at all they must keep up the barrieri Selfpreservation not for Russia but for themselves at the root and Isthe explanation of their sinister and malignant policy We are now confronted with something quite as wicked but in some ways than Hitler These 14 men in the Kremlin have their hierarchy and ofsCommunist adepts whose missionaries are in every country as a fifth column await ng the day when theyhope to be absolute masters of their fellow countrymen They have their antiGod religion Behind the kremlin the largest army in the world In the hands of a gsv eminent pur suingimperialist expansion as no czar or kaiser had eyer done The failure to strangle bdl hevism at its birth and to bring lussia by one means or an ther into the general democratic ystem lies heavy upon us today fke Much Improved KEY WEST Fla March 31 navy reported Thursj tay thatGen Dwight D Eisen lowers health is so improved he spent a half hour thi morning golf balls with his ap iroach irons The general arrived lere Monday from Washington to rest and recuperate from a severe itomach ailment or kaiser had ever done The failure to strangle Bol shevism at its birth lies heavy upon us today Principal Speaker Churchill made the feature speech at the threeday midcen tury convocation of the Massachu setts Institute of Technology Hia immediate audience included hundreds of the worldsleading thinkers and mendf affairs tare to exchange ideas on Ths Realisation Promise r i jfctf ter interrupted oil and continued at the end of hii ad dress when he stood smiling broadly and giving famed V sign Introducing ChurchillBernard M Baruch called him the great est living Englishman the finest flowering of leadership and states manship that England ever pro duced Earlier retiring MIT Pres Karl Compton read a letter from res Truirsn in which the chief executive expressed his regret at1 having to cancel his scheduled peech to the convocation Friday night Then Churchill took over Radio In addition to his direct nee was accorded a adlo and television audience of almost unprecedented magnitude It was his first public speech n this country since his historic ulton Mo address yean go this month It was then that e coined the curr am to describeRussia and her atellites Thursday night he said that its not inevitable and that he id not think violent orprecipi ate action should be taken now o stem the encroachment of com munism r i Underthe impact of commti ism ailthe free nttions of world are being welded together see Imte I Colnasi 4 Boisterous Bunch of Pickets Greets Winnie at Boston BOSTON March 31 as hour before land He was treated in a London I Isntic area will sign 20year hospital for back injuries defensive alliance ong line of pickets awaited Win ton Churchill Thursday night that bundle back o Britain and We wont win with Winnie Men and women were in a houting line which carried signs eading No atom war and The Atlantic pact means war They appeared shortly before Church 1s scheduled speech at Boston garden One man in clerical collar said e represented the Protestant Action committee Several other marchers were In clerical dress Other spokesmen said they rep esented four or five organizat ions A girl shouted I represent ieace She passed cut handbills igned Citizens Action Commit ee for Peace v Groups of bystanders waiting or a sight of the famed Briton shouted slow down at the picket ine An air of wss noticeable in this history proud city with Churchill at last to make known his message of importance A lent lady picket who appeared Churchills dress identifed herself lotte Just Chiri a handed little woman whos trying to educate She held high a penciled card board sign which called forthe wellbeing of all in America V Ticketless Bostonians w e r turned away from the gates of the huge sports arenawhich wis open only to invited guests of Massa chuaetts Institute of Technology A policeman at a door said They all seem surprised that you have to have tickets noted technological furnished tickets for 13000 alumiJ and invited guests from several nations here for a threeday con ference on the social implications of scientific progress Holders of the prized tickets were slow In filing mto hifh balconied arena An MIT spokesman saw the institute of re4 quests for tickets which couldnt pressure tort M said hss been than any recent times   

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