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Provo Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Provo Daily Herald

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   Daily Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 6, 1943, Provo, Utah                                Call The Herald tl you dont receive your HeraHJ oelofe call 495 before B and a copy will to The Weather i Frovo awl vicinity Slightly cooler this little changp lot temperature Temperatures High 38 FIFTYEIGHTH 64 COMPLETE UNITED PRESS TELEGRAPH NEWS 8BRVICB OTAH SEPTEMBER 1943 UTAHS ONur SOUTH or SALT LAKH PRICE FIVE CENtTS rSDr Labor 1943 Working and Fighting far Victory JUAB COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL Sunday Fire Destroys Building At Nephi NEPHI of undeter mined origin almost com pletely destroyed the beauti ful Nephi high school build at an early hour Sunday leaving the district with a serious housing prob lem a few weeks before the scheduled opening of The loss is estimated at the worst fire in the history of Only the walls and sec tions of some of the re as the fire completely gutted the entire which included a gymnasiumauditorium wing and a modern swimming The loss is covered by the maximum amount of insurance school officials The discovered at Sunday by Bryce started in the home economics department and spread quickly through the ceilingattic space to the builtup tarred and the entire structure was soon enveloped in Calls were placed for fire do partments at Spanish Fork and Mount as soon as it was realized by Nephi fjre department officials that addition al assistance would be needed to cope with the Nephi offic ials praised the fine work per formed by these neighboring fire and without their help the loss would undoubtedly have been much The fire men worked continuously until after noon Sunday before the last On this Labor as the nation honors its working men and Labor itself is backing our ot tiie Maze was fighting men by staying on the job to produce more of the weapons of For victory depends on the soldier of production as as on the soldier on the Symbolic of Americas battle on the Work front and the war front is the man who both works and Navy who uses the sledgehammer with equal of the blaze was Very little of the interior fur nishings and equipment was with the exception of the records of the and the It is believed that some desks on the lower floor can be but all other including kitchen sewing was de The building was erected in 1922 at a cost of and was first used in 1923 for the junior and senior high school stu dents of Levan and Plans were discussed by the Rchool officials and the board of rducation Mondav for the L D S buildings Labor day address at and other structures as tempor thatthey supreme chal Workers Urged To Step Up Pace Of War Production BY UNITED PRESS President William Green of the American of Labor told labor and industry today in a ary school quarters until the building can be reconstructedT The tentative date for opening of school has been set for September Churchill Says Must Accept World Leadership Prime Winston Churchill said today in referring to the United States that a na tion cannot to a position of leadership in the civilized worV without being involved in it Churchill came to Cambridge tr receive an honorarv degree of nor tor of from Harvard nnivcr and spoke briefly on the oc Evfln as it has been in the past it will ho indisputable in fu ture that the people of the States cannot escape a share o world he The world has been in rat to th powers of locomo the visiting Prime Ministe and responsibilities increased as relations among thr nations have become throughout the pres ent will find in the Brit commonwealth and empirr srood Churchill prom Rcferrinc to his own strain of American wa Jennie Jerome of New Churchill said that there were tier of blood between the two and a child of both arr conscious of these We do not war primarily wiU races as Churcnill Tyranny is our ever trappings or disguise1 it wear must be ever on snare ready to spring at its throat must He observed that combined inili tary staff work of Britain anf Continued on Page Three lenge and the supreme responsi that America stands on the brink of ad vancing or retarding the final Every new production mark that we every new height that we is going to shorten uns war and save the lives of thousands of our own American our our he What shall our answer be If I understand the hearts and minds Americas that answer will be un inspired work to back ip to the limit of fighting Green reaffirmed labors no strike but criticized the administration for allowing Eco lomic Stabilizer Fred Vinson overrule decisions of the war abor Can any outsider even an economic stabilization enow more about the inflationary a wage increase than the JAP DOWNED American P40 fighter planes shot down rtiree and four er emy aircraft in a raid last Frds on the Japanese airdrome at Can a from Lieut Joseph Stilwells nead quarters said Labor For War Plant Workers Wfapleton Farmer Meets Death in HeadOn Crash for the most celebrated Labor day today in true wartime at War industriescontinuedto run at full speed as work ers forewent usual day relaxation to keep warvital materials flowing to the There was no interruption of work at the Geneva Steel construction where over 9000 men are at work in rushing the gigantic plant to com expected some time this most civilian business was closed for the city and county offices and retail stores were among those not open for Some fed eral government offices remained open to handle necessary Celebrations were with most resorts being closed for the and and tire ra tioning cutting dawn pleasure The Utah State Fair was the Crash Hurts Fatal To Idaho Judge 6 district Judge Jay ocatcllo died at a Boise hospital this morning from injuries in an automobile acci dent four milrswest of Mountain Home a few hours main attraction in Salt Lake Several thousand persons passed through the gates early and several more were expected to visit the exhibits before the days final exhibition in honor of the Navy and Traffic accidents were at a minimum during the How the holiday weekend was not Dibble of Mapleton was killed pic up truck he was driving crashed headon into another truck by Parley Johnson of Johnson and three children ridinfi with him receiver cuts and bruis William a passenger in the Dibble also was Kepubiican Leaders Debate Partys International Policies MACKINAG 6 Republican policy including of the nost prominently mentioned 1944 possibilities began to ay the task of drafting the plat orm the party will seek o unseat the GOP Harrison pangler opened the first formal meeting of his postwar policy Council promising a forthright itatement general on domestic and international He said the statement need not too detailed because this is time for this country to ommit itself to specific obliga he went it should be an expression representing the studied judgment of a majority the nations voters in the fact that council of 24 12 five sena tors and nine national commit members represents fifths of the population How the party will stand on thfe subject of postwar collaboration with other nations dominated the tha t resnect Governors Thorn Dewey of York anr Earl Warren of California went the farthest into the field of in ternationalism of three presi dential potentials who lield press MAC ARTHUR LEADS DRIVE AGAINST LAE Japanese Bases Split In Surprise Landing In New Guinea MAPLETON Final rites for Elden Norris Maple ton farmer killed in a headon crash of two trucks here Saturday at 11 will be conducted Thursday at 2 in the Maple ton ward Dibble died shortly after the northbound truck he was driving crashed into a southbound truck driven by Parley of William of Maple a passenger in the Dibble suffered severe lacerations and while Johnson and three children accompanying incurred minor cuts and according to Highway Patrolmen Eldon Sherwood Nephi and Sharp of The Merlin 11 Labelle 5 and Alton all of They were taken to their homes after treatment at the Utah Valley Invesigating officers said the Dibble truck was on the wrong side of the road when it collided with the machine driven byJohn his truck loaded with was en route was born in ton March son of Willis and Zina Binks He was educated in the Mapleton and He married Dorothy Slatter January He joined the national when it was organized here n 1940 arid was placed on reserve when the unit left for California in He is survived by his Dne Linda his mother and four brothers and sis Elaine and Fay Mrsi Laree Warren and Mabel and a all of Friends may the Claudin funeral home until 10 Thurs day and then the family resi lence before JUGOSLAVS TAKE ITALIAN HARBOR v 6 Morocco radio said today that TugoSlave guerillas has captured e northern Adriatic harbor town near Fiume bor Continued on Page Three der area of Italy and CAS WELL United Press Staff Correspondent ALLIED HEADQUAR SOUTHWWEST PA 6 GB forces that split the Japanese chain of New Guinea coastal bases i in a surprise landing have advanced nearly 10 rriiJes to within nine miles of theenemys stronghold at a spokesman announced Tftie landtag forces moved swift ly from their beachheads north eastrof Lae to Singaua plantation deep iii the the spokes man in a drive to invest the garrison which was believed along with the enemy base at down the The offensive to sweep the enemy from the New Guinea coastline was under the personal direction of Douglas Mac Melbourne radio broadcast recorded by the United Pressin New York said Australian troops were attacking7 the inner defens es of The Mel bourne was the largest ever attempted in the New Guinea LossesReportedr Tokyo radio broadcasts re ported by OWI said six Allied a cruiser and many other vessels were sunk and five transports and two destroyers set afire by Japanese planes during the Loss of nine Japan ese aircraft was A Japanese c o m m u nique broadcast by Tokyo and recorded by flnited Press inNew York said the landing took place 22 miles east of and that heavy fight ing wasin The com munique reported 27 Allied planes shot Under cover of naval guns and bombing American engi neers and Australian infantry went ashore northeast of Lae and a communique re ported the enemy base was being invested The Salamaua garrison has no place to rereat and that is in the Sir Thomas commander Allied land MacArthur moved his head quarters into New Guinea to take over direction of the swiftly de veloping offensive to sweep the from the New Guinea coast where they had been en trenched more than 17 Allied Liberators dropped 180 tons of bombs into Lae and the surrounding area in two days of constant attacks to aid the land and fighters shot down 21 Japanese planes that attacked the landing craft American warships preceded the assault a barrage from Hudn Gulf and laid a covering smoke As front dispatch said that only two landing craft were hit the with small No opnosi tion on land in the initial attack was Two Allied fighters were Italy Invasion Going As Scheduled Scilla SAN GIOVANNI Cope Sfxitttvento Ionian After initial invasion landtags between Reggio Calabria and San Gio vanni on the toe of more British and Canadian troops have been put ashore between Melito and Cape from which the land drives have as indicated by Flying Fortresses Hit German Targets By WILLIAM DICKINSON United Press Staff Correspondent 6 Flying Fortresses hit targets in southwest Germany in daylight after Brit ish fourengined devastated the Rhineland inland port and arms center of last night with upwards of tons of ex While the Fortresses battled their way half way across Eu American Marauder medium bombers pounded a railway mar shalling yard at Rouen in north ern The daylight raids carried the latest around theclock Anglo American air offensive against Hitlers European fortresi into its fifth American Thunderbolt Fall of Center of Donets Imminent In Brief UNITJGD PRESS Eighth Army gains on 30mile front in southern capturing San 10 miles and other Allied naval units bombard both evnds offfightlng WKSTKfRN can raid southwestern British pianos drop vmore than tons ofhomi on Rhineland industrial cites of Mannheim and Ludwig shafen Army within 14 miles of Stalinn ip drivn to Hbfir half of Donets basin ontflank Konotop onap Allied nearly 10 after landine 4bovo New LOlSGDONjKome radio says Italians eager to make honorable By HENRY SHAPIRO United Press Staff Correspondent Sept 6 army columns have driven to within much than 15 miles of and the fall of that Donets Basin industrial capital is front reports said to Russian sources in London said one group of Soviet troops was only three miles east of A Bern dispatch to the Stock holm newspaper Nya Dagligt Al said the Germans had begun evacuating The newspaper Pravda reported that more than onehalf of the fighters supported the while RAF and Allied Spitfires covered and escorted the Maraud Still another formation of Al lied planes roared out across the Straits of Dover toward France shortly before First report that the Flying Fortresses were over Germany came from the Berlin The Berlin heard here at 11 6 said that heavy air battles be tween American bombers and German fighters were at that Donets Basin had been liberated j moment taking place over Baden and the southwest and the mass expulsion of the Germans from the Ukraine was progressing The Red army was reported sweeping Tforward on five major ern provinces of The days target was not re ported by the German but the flight marked the second the Donets American penetration of southern of in the Konotop sec1 or central On west of anrl before two formations of Flvinp For west of and The roar of the cannonade al ready is on the banks of the gray Dnieper at the gatesof before two formations of Flying For tresses bombed roller bearing factories at 65 miles east of and a Mes serschmitt plant at ancient Russian capital of i 55 miles southeast of Pravda at a total loss of 59 Pravda said the greatest progI The formation that hit Regens was made in theDonets burg last month flewonto North Basin and the northern African bases and bombed Bor Continued on Page Three continued on Page Three Allied Strategy To Concentrate On Attacks Against Germany Itself KY United Press Staff Correspondent Sept6 The Quebec conference has been called the peripheral Allied strategy and the opening of the European wars final the concentration of maximum against jit was indicated clearly This conclusion was from implications in two weekrend of an autnorl tative soice in VVashingrton and of Henry air force in The Washington speak ing of speculation on a campaign pointedout that such yn adventure offered the Allies of modest returns com pared with blows aimed at Ger many Arnold reemphasized that the European theater of operations has priority on United States heavy bomber production and while he would not indicate wheth er the percentage coming to the European theater was being step ped wouldsurprise no one if coming weeks saw a massive flow of planes to The pattern of warfare indi cated by these statements was a Continued on Page Tnree ITALY WANTS PEACE SAYS ROME RADIO American 7th Army Has Left North Africa Reports Madnd By UNWED PRESS British and Canadian troops overran the coastal areas of southern Italy today as rapidly as the mountains and Axis demolitions would and the Rome radio gave a very clear indication that the Italians would like to quit the A Rome broadcast warned that additional Allied landings on the Italian mainland were almost a and stated that Italy desires an honorable peace at the earUest possible moment In this a Madrid quoting unconfirmed re ports from said that the American 7th army left North African ports during the night and headed across the Medi terranean for an unknown dear The Americana far have taken no part in the invas ion of and last were re in action at the end of the Sicilian Capture San The British eighth ad vancing on a 30mile driven 10 miles into the moun tainous southern tip of Italy to capture San and has in creased its total prisoners to it was announced Besides San Stefano situated the lofty Aspromontc mountains 10 miles northeast of Reggio Cala bria and seven milrs south of which fell Dther towns antf Villages also ivere captured though tone was announced Very extensive demolitions bridges and highways slowedthe pace of the British and Canadian invaders literally to a walki communique though nowhere the troops haltrd The mountainous nature of the country is of great assistance to the enemy particularly m the center of the thP communique The road connecting Saht fant with Reggio as well as San Stefani also was captured the main Eighth Army columns eastward the coastal road that com pletely encircles One was probing along the west coast toward Palmi after linking up with a special landing party captured 15 miles north east of Reggio while thn ither rounded the southern tip of and drove eastward through Port of 15 miles south east of An Italian communique cast by the Rome radio said Italo forces wore up a tacit admission f rotrcatafter strenuously con possession of the coastal A Mind vessels continued to back and across Straits with supplies and reinforcmenttt anda navaK com said fhf Strait now was to Allied I Board Considers School Possibilities of delaying the city schools on iccount of the infantile paralysis epidemic were slated for discus sion at a meeting of Charlea city with the board of thisafter Salt Lake City elementary Behoofs Saturday were ordered fey the Sftlt board of hcaltff to remain closed one montte until October In the event the Provo board decides yoml the announced starting date of September the city un doubtedly will take steps to pro hibit of fe children the susceptible agw and other public hvs fjwSchUdreni Smith reported todajKone J new case of infantile paralyafit to the past five new cases last   

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