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Winnsboro News: Thursday, September 8, 1977 - Page 1

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   Winnsboro News (Newspaper) - September 8, 1977, Winnsboro, Texas                                P. 0. mi 45436 DALLAS, TEXAS T5255 Unexpected snag slows Clapton Road project Proaress on the lone-sou �rht MOMS, DADS, friends. ex-Raiders, students...they're all avid Red Raider fans, and they really had something to cheer about when this shot was taken. The home stands had just been thrilled by a 65-yard touchdown run by Raider halfback R. A. Home in early first quarter action in the season opener here Sept. 2 against Quitman. The TD. and a PAT by Damon Henson, knotted the score at 7-7 in a game that had 14 points on the Raider Stadium scoreboard before the new football season was two minutes old. See anyone you know? (Staffoto) Progress on tin long-sought Clopton farm-to-market Road in Franklin County has struck another snag. As a result, the Texas Highway Department is thought to have momentarily stopped progress on the project until more conclusive evidence that the Franklin County Commissioners Court has surmounted an unexpected heavy expense due to five pipelines across the second segment of the projected road. It has recently been discovered that five pipelines will have to be crossed by the second segment which could add $47,000 to right-of-way costs if done now but which could grow via inflation to 155,000 to 960,000 by the time construction would actually take place in the normal progress of things two or three years hence. the first 2^-mile segment of the road which would connect from Highway US just south of the bridge across Lake Cypress Springs with Highway 37 near Wylle Methodist Church has already contracted and deeds were being drawn up for right-of-way purchase. This 2^-mlle segment begins at Highway 115 with actual construction not far off. However, neither the state department nor the county wants the road stubbed off 2Mi miles from lis until they are pretty sure It can eventually be completed to Highway 37. With the substantial extra expense of crossing the pipelines suddenly Injected into the picture, Franklin County Commissioners are faced with figuring the problem out. Franklin County Judge Bill Meek told Mayor Jim Livingston and Gary Cain in a meeting last Thursday that there was no problem at to right-of-way purchases for the first 3Vfc miles. "However, we knew of two pipelines that had to be crossed in the second segment and due to unexpected expense encountered because of a pipeline on a road north of the lake we School enrolment shows slight drop Serving Northeast Texas' Leading Produce Market. Agricultural Section and Rick Four-County Oil Area 3Jje Mtttttaborn 8>wh Volume 69-Number 46 Winnsboro, Wood County, Texas 75494 Thurs., Sept. 8, 1977 ISc per copy One Section-Fourteen Pages Although still near the highest level in history, enrolment in Winnsboro schools has failed to show the expected increase so far as the 1977-78 term opens. Enrolment reported early Wednesday, four school days after classes began last Thursday morning, was 1216 students, a decrease of 30 from last year's high of 1246 in the third day of school. Westbrook School, where Principal William Reuss expected an increase over early enrolment of 472 last year, has had only 426 to show up so far from pre-enrolment figures of 458. A check has not been made yet to see what happened to the 32 who haven't reported yet. A slight gain has occured in Memorial School, 387 this year against 373 a year ago, while in high school figures are 403 this year against 401 a year ago. The Uth grade at the high First Baptist set reception for Hubbells Rev. and Mrs. Dan Hubbell will be honored with a reception Sunday night, September 11, following the evening worship service at First Baptist Church. The occasion will mark Rev. Hubbell's eighth anniversary as pastor for the church. The Hubbells came to Winnsboro from Grand Saline in September 1969. Their oldest son, Danny, was one year old and their youngest son, David was born here in 1970. During the eight years of Hubbell's ministry, the church has shown a consistent growth in all areas. During this time the membership has grown from 646 to 1,330. The Bible study attendance has increased from an average of 234 to 425 per Sunday. Total receipts of the church have increased from $73,000 to $160,000 per year. Contributions to world-wide mission causes have increased from $19,000 to over $50,000 for support of 5,000 missionaries of the Southern Baptist Convention. school had the largest enrollment in the school system with 112 students. Memorial School's largest grade was- the fifth grade with 110 students; The largest grade at Westbrook School was the third grade with 100 students. Bussing of 57 fourth grade students to the former South Franklin School building began Tuesday where classes will be held until portable buildings are completed at Westbrook. Superintendent L. M. West said the buildings are now under construction and are expected to be delivered to Westbrook School during the coming week, weather permitting. Interior finishing will be completed following delivery. Up to opening day every indication was that the schools would continue an average increase of 25 to 30 students as in the past several years and officials are still expecting some gain during the first couple of weeks over opening figures. Finance drive gets going for park land purchase THE AUTUMN Trails Association fund-raising drive for the erection of a new Hospitality Center received a substantial boost with a $1,500 contribution from the Lions Club whose members also will donate their time for complet- ing the Interior of the building after it is erected on West Broadway Street across from the Carnegie Library. Lions Club president Mark Taylor, left, presented the check to Autumn Trails president Ron-ny Knight. (Staffoto) Hospitality Center site OK'd An indefinite lease with the L and A Railroad Company for use of railroad company property located between the railroad tracks and Broadway street from Mill to Church streets as a site for a new Autumn Trails Hospitality Center was approved by the Winnsboro City Council Tuesday night. An annual lease fee of $240 will be paid by the Autumn Trails Association. A building which can be removed from the site should the lease be terminated by either party will be erected on the property. Mayor Jim Livingston told the council that city employees have started cleaning the street in the downtown area in preparation for the annual Autumn Trails festival which begins October 1. Livingston urged the council members to remind other merchants and residents to clean their property so that AT visitors will receive a favorable view of the Animal control law takes effect Nov. 1 Effective November 1, Winn sboro residents will be required to have all dogs over the age of three months licensed by the city after the dog has been vaccinated against rabies by a licensed veterinarian. The licensing of dogs within the City of Winnsboro was approved in an animal control ordinance passed on the third and final reading by the City Council Tuesday night. The fee for licensing was set at 1300 and will be issued by the City Tax Collector upon receipt to proof by the owner or keeper of the dog that it has been inoculated for rabies. Licenses will be effective for one year from the date of vaccination. Boga which are permitted to run at large within toe city without  license will be picked up end impounded. Owners of such dogs will be permitted to redeem the doc within 73 hours upon payment of a mm of 18.00 for each dog and $3.00 per day for each dog in addition to the license fee provided for in the ordinance. If a dog is not redeemed within 72 hours following impoundment, the dog may be given to a new owner who will pay the impounding fees and other wise comply with the ordinance- Any dog which is not redeemed or given to a new owner shall be humanely destroyed. Persons violating any provision of the ordinance snail be levied a fine not exceeding 1800 for each offense. Each day constitutes a separate offense. The ordinance will become effective November 1 to allow time for residents to have their dugs properly tanged, prepare the kWineiff for imnninuJinn tha doSS for MB ploying an stall) control officer. Dr. Karl James, local veterinarian, will (Npjps^rd^ ^s^^ k^W^^^jflS ^AfrtjMSfa ^(fi$\J be leased to (be city. city. Insurance for Firemen The council approved an insurance policy through Crad-dock and Company which will provide benefits for volunteer firemen who are injured or killed while fighting a fire, The policy provides for $10,000 a death benefit, $500 medical and $100 a week while the fireman is unable to work for a period up to 104 weeks. Premium for the three-year policy is $1,531.25. Bank Requests Okayed A request from Winnsboro Bank and Trust to designate the alley between the Cain Bank building and Newman Brothers used car lot as one way eastbound was approved. The closing of all alleys on property south of Brookshire Food Store and bounded by Main, Myrtle and Mill Streets with the alley right of way to be deeded to the property owner was approved, also. The property has been purchased as a future site for the new bank. Councilman Lemon abstained from voting because of his personal interest in the bank. Other Activities Newman Brothers was granted the use of three additional parking spaces on the south side of Broadway Street in front of their business for a fee of $4 a month for each space. The car agency already pays $8 a month for two parking spaces adjacent to the additional spaces. Council woman Madeline McCrary reported that the Parks and Recreation Board is ready to proceed with a fund-raising drive for the purchase of property adjacent to the City Park. The board has set a goal of $21,000 to be used to purchase 8.1 acres so that the park area may be expanded to 30.77 acres, including the 12.67 acres now owned by the city Thomas Barber of Tyler appeared before the council to discuss services provided by his architect, engineering and planning firm to cities for obtaining community development block grants from the Housing and Urban Development. The grants may be used for projects which will benefit low income areas. M. D. Carlock, local attorney, presented a request from Westland Oil Corporation for a meeting with the council for the purpose of discussing an agreement whereby the company may defray part of the cost of upkeep on Mitchell Street so that its trucks may use the street as a route to their plant. Trucks are banned from traveling on Mitchell and Pine Streets because of extensive damage from heavy truck traffic. A public hearing for the allocation of $70,565.00 in revenue sharing funds was set for 5;30 p.m. Wednesday, September 21, at the City Auditorium. Plans today call for the initial solicitation of funds to get underway this week in the finance drive for enlargement and inprovement of the Winnsboro City Park complex. Sponsored by the Winnsboro Park and Recreation Board, the drive is for funds to finance the purchase of approximately eight acres of land adjoining present city park property at a cost of about $21,000. This land plus three acres to be donated and 7.2 acres offered under a longterm lease for tax payments only would enlarge the total complex to 30.77 acres which the board feels would be ample for , activities now and many years * to come. The month of September will be devoted to the finance drive with a number of clubs participating in the effort. Printed pamphlets with a map showing the overall land projection and a full explanation of the project have been prepared for use by solicitors of donations. These also are to be distributed at club meetings as various organizations begin a new year of activities during the month. Participation cards also have been prepared containing a pledge for those who would like to spread their OP enrolment holds steady at 470 level Como-Pickton School began the 1977-78 year Monday, August 29, with 461 students enrolled in kindergarten through 12th. The elementary grades reported an opening day enrollment of 340 students with the high school enrollment totaling 121. When classes resumed Tuesday following the Labor Day holiday, the enrollment had climbed to 471. The increase of 10 students was divided equally between the high school and elementary grades. The 1976-77 opening day enrollment totaled 469 students. donation over several months or more time. Deadline for solicitations to be completed is September 29 at which time it is hoped that the needed funds will have been paid or pledged. After the property is purchased and donated to the city, development is due to come with the assistance of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in planning, financing and general direction for longtime enjoyment of citizens of this area and visitors here. City funds that could be made available for parks at this time would be used for back-up and possibly to finish this program and another major'outlay at Lions Park. The Lions.facility also is scheduled for donation to the City in order to qualify for matching state funds for development. Land desired to be purchased is a 2.4 acre tract owned by Dr. Karl James along the small stream that runs across the park area and 5.5 acres owned by Bob Lemon Immediately west of the rodeo arena and auditorium area. City adopts record budget of $527,541 The Winnsboro City Council adopted an ad valorem tax rate of $1.25 per hundred on 30 percent of assessed valuation for 1977-78 at its regular monthly meeting Tuesday night. Ad valorem tax collections and penalties for the year was estimated at $105,600.08. Estimated city sales tax receipts amounted to $116,966.38. The tax rate was set following a review and approval of the budget for the coming year which provides for a total of $527,541.17 in estimated expenditures from the general fund and water and sewer fund and an estimated income of $582,435.46. The tax rate was approved with a unanimous vote of all council members. However, Councilman George S. Lemon Jr. abstained on the vote for the budget because he had not been able to study the budget in depth before it was presented for approval because of illness. Estimated unappropriated cash for the fiscal year which ends June 30,1978, amounted to $74,855.81. However, $31,820 was allocated for tax bond payments which are due during the year. This leaves an estimated $43,035.81 which can be used for unexpected expenses which might occur, Genera) fund income estima- tes included general administration, $270,640.46; Police Department, $20,400; City Airport, $14,000; Sanitation Department, $72,150, and Animal Control Department, $4,900. No Income was listed for the Fire Department, library and C|ty Auditorium and parks. Proposed expenditures from the general fund are general adminstration, $83,534.73; Police Department, $105,836.22; animal control, $11,000; Fire Department, $25,164.76; Street Department, $36,216.20; airport, $17,356.66; library, $7,6-38,99; auditorium and parks, $38,670.50, and Sanitation Department, $54,608.86. Estimated income from water revenue was $149,200 and estimated sewer revenue was $49,200. Proposed water expenditures were $100,807.41; sewer expenditures, $22,646,04, and water and sewer adminstration, $23,960.80. The 1977-78 budget is $81,541 more than the 1976-77 budget of $446,000, Council members called the new budget a tight one with some of the increase estimated due to new items which were included in the budget, such as parks and recreation facilities, animal control and salary for a business manager which could be employed during the year. asked the highway department to check up on possible coat on the Clopton Road." It was then that the court discovered there were Ave instead of two lines and the possible added expense of the right-of-way since the county would have to pay that added cost unlets some other source was located. Pipelines to be crossed and estimated expense for each are: Scurlock Oil Co. (old Gulf line)......8" $9,000,00 Texoma...........30"30,000.00 American Petroflna..........10"$3,000.00 Delhi Gas.............$3,000.00 Texas Utilities........$2,000.00 Judge Meek also stated that If each of these lines were in the $3,000 range, the court would go along with the project but that the $30,000 job is the real problem area. Judge Meek stated Wednesday morning that the court plans to contact each company in an effort to get them to bear the expense of their own line. "We also will be seeking help from the highway department or any other place we can get it. Anything that Winnsboro, residents of the area and others can do will be appreciated," ha said, "since we are anxious to get this road completed." One commissioner at the meeting last Thursday said that Lake Cypress Springs development on the south side of the lake was behind and that completion of this road should help that Assistant District Highway Engineer Harry Short in the Paris office pointed out that the Highway Department is completely blocked in any instance where right-of-way requirements are not met. Alto,- he would not say that work toward the first, segment had been stopped due to the second-segment problems. More than likely the resident engineer Just has other work that la occupying his time right now. ; Short'alio'advised that the second Segment was not included in the 1977 Farm-to* Market road program sent in during August from the Paris district office to the state. Bui Stain he declined to say that peline problem had any bearing on the decision for the road not to be included. He explained that we only get enough money for a relatively few miles of such road in our nine-county district and the probability is that this road would not have been included any way since at least one county has not been listed for the past two years. Possible solution to the problem is yet to be worked out but Winnsboro citizens and others as well as the Franklin County commissioners are seeking answers in order that no actual delay will occur in the construction of this long-needed road. Band Boosters meet announced The Red Raider Band Boosters will meet at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 13, in the high school band hall. Fund raising projects to complete the payment for the new band uniforms will be discussed. The Band Boosters have sponsored band trips and end of school year parties for the band, purchased a van used by the band and provided the cost of operation for the van, Hungry Raiders still after a victory ANOTHER strange __. creature which seesss to annear arraiinaaHv ia the ^fy^*     'SW^^P^wwWBIWIR^    flip    wH&r Tri-c�u�ty area shewed up  H � final liiamn record in g�MPwTOF�p W WSHUPW SSSewBJB^WSSSf * WW^^ W *7� iA-iti**! to that of the Raiders^ somewhat umiimi* The Huahes BnriMi football fortunes am alan aniaatad to 'WfRBV ^BSjBjSSeSJ^^" IWBT^r .JHSHWSS? ^Wa^SJBSHSS^P^^^K improve this year, however, and much depends on tailback Celester Washington, who single-handedly did more damage against the Raiders last trip than all the other Mustangs combined. The game plan for most teams that play Hughes Springs is fairly simple: stop Celester and you've gone a long way toward halting the Must* angs. That's what the Raiders did last year, as Damon Henson caught the 10.0 speedster a solid lick early in the game that sldifllntd WaahAnaton for sev> era) minutes. Celester wag Washington is joined in the UackftekTby halfback Robert Abernatby, another iio-pound' er who turns m yards in ID ^^^ow^jii #fjfttj. ftiwdi   '.^^wi^^^s^' good DAUgir. JBjpiPlfflSa gSBSSHSSSjeaSSP w- BiwuiHntf rannrta ravaal that Hiiirhas Swinia la not a big taam. hut then fan axtNnaly quick. They have seven or eight players that start on both offense and defense, and most of them are among eight offensive and nine defensive regulars back from last year. Head coach Philip Holt rates Hughes Springs as a "better team than Quitman," especial' ly in view of a 17-1 win Friday night over Rivercrest. Holt reported sadly that Jay Undley, who was listed to start at halfback and at defensive end for the Raiders, Is now out season., havlna undsraons knee "^^^^PPy ewPj>vSspoaa -^snjiSjejSHP^B^isstW' i^sbbtof surgery ttwaday, Holt aajd tbatjht Rafcters . ^sViiei ^Jl^y     fl^s^fe^d|9f9 ^Je^^JRfts^ftP' j^Sfcdi trip, and listed offensive fittMtatrs w iv^'JW* ftlld* cft.s5SpRRWWM ^^ft.^ft^Wi^i Jimmy Henderson; center, �!*� Uadt^rff SSSt' n
                            

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