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Wichita Daily Times Newspaper Archive: December 23, 1921 - Page 1

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Publication: Wichita Daily Times

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   Wichita Daily Times (Newspaper) - December 23, 1921, Wichita Falls, Texas                            THE WEATHER Wichita Falla am! To. nlglt Saturday rail, eoMet Blgat, eoUer gatcrdar. HOME: EDITION VOLUME XV. PRICE NO MORE WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1921. SIXTEEN PAGES NUMBER 224. SIX INJURED IN DUKE, OKLA. FIRE _______JL ._____ EXPECT TO CONCLUDE HEARING AT ARDMORE LATE FRIDAY EVENING ARDMORE. Dec. prelimi- nary trial alx an a charge mmrdrr In connection wlta tke killing tkree men at Wlliou the of December IS was nd- Jonmed abruptly today, wben Front. Bourland, former of the peace here nnd itnte wltnem In tke declined to answer to blm by Attorney Gen- eral 9, P. Frevtlng pertaining to the Kn Klan. After propounding 10 uuntloni eoncrrnlnK the Ku Klut Klan only of which the wltneM consented to Banner, Mr. Freellnu ri-qur.ted granted adjournment of the tearing until ne'it Tuesday tn nllon him tine to ronaali the ntnt- on the subject. ARDMORE, OKLA.. Dec. Harris, business man of Ardr.-.orc. the first witness called vvhen the trial of seven charged with murder in connection with the death of three men at Wilson the night of Dec. 15, wag resumed be- fore Justice of the Peace D. W. Butcher, testified that C. G. Sims, Ardmore police detective, came to him Thursday and asked him "to accompany Wm out in the aaylng he had located several sto- len cars. Harris said It was, im- possible for him to go and that he refused Sims. Sims, the prosecution .contends, persuaded several score prominent Carter county citizens to go with masked men to the pasture. i j was quoted as saying, were 30 or 40 automobiles and about 130 or 200 masked men. Later he went with the party in two automobiles to Wilson, where some one got out and looked for Joe Carroll, but were unable to find him. He then was taken to the house of his brother, John Smith, and told him that hv would have to go with the party to show where Carrol! lived. This John Smith, the man who was Uillt'd, Is no relation to the John Smith of Healdton. When John Smith went to the door to call Carroll out, according to Jell Smith's alleged statement, he as ordered by masked men who stationed themselves on each side of the door, to throw up his hands. Carroll then pulled his gun and in a scuffle to take It away from Him, Jeff Smith vvas quoted as saying the latter vvas shot In the leg. As the shoounji between Carroll and his assailants continued. Smith told the assistant county attorney that he was atraid the party would desert him and that he crawled into one of the automobiles, where he was later joined by another wounded man whose Identity he was unable to ascertain. N'me witnesses had hcen exam- ined when adjourned for lunch. During the testimony of .Mr. Hodge, the attorney general moved the court to order the re- lease of John Smith, one of the de- hlm to Joe Carroll's house at Aidants, on grounds that there during: which Carroll was shot noth.ng to show his participat- and killed and Sims mortally Bounded. His body later was found in a field five miles from thej acene of the shooting. First mention in the trial of the alleged participation of members of the Ku Klux Klan In the attack upon Carroll waa made by J. A. Enuain, another witness. He is custodian of a lodge hall here Which is used by several fraternal orders. Among them, he testified, Was one Known as "Business Men's league" or "K. K. K." He de- clared that this order maintained B "property1" room in the building and that the night of the arttack he ing in the raid. This was granted and the prisoner returned to Ms home. CROWD Ifll.LS TflE COtJhT AT EARLY HOVR By Associated Press ARDMORE, OKLA.. Dec.' an early hour this morning crowds began filling the corridors at the courthouse here awaiting the opening at 10 o'clock of the second day of the examining trial of seven prominent Carter county citizens charged with murder growing out of the death of three at Wll- ,_ son, near here on the night of Dec. J. A. Gilliam, welt known m 15 Ardmore, who is awaiting trial in Approximately 20 more witnesses with the case, leave the w AUorney General S. P. Freellng late yester- day adjournment after testified, to better familiarize .himself with the case. Earlier In the day ha had stated that he expected to finish submis- sion of testimony Friday. County authorities In pursuance ka'-l with another, man abput 7 with bundles under their arms. Attracted Robert Hall, furniture dealer of Wilson, testified that was at- tracted oy the sound of shots and women screamrhg and that he women itarted to investigate. He met John of instructions .from the governor, Smith, he. said, who told him that -1- he had been shot. He gbt his auto-. mobile and took Smith to the hos- pital, he testified. Smith died soon afterward and unable to tell who had shpt Jilm. Hall testified that before the shooting He saw O. >i. Whltchurch of Ardmore, one of the defendants, en the street In Wilson with an- other man and that he spoke to him but Whltchurch turned away and not acknowledge his greet- Charles Jones. Insurance man of testified that he saw Tom Halle, of Ardmore, another defend- aititXind Dr. E. C. Hatlow and J. A Gflliam, both of Ardmore 'and charged with murder ,in the case, but nut on trial at this time, on the street in Wilson between nine and ten o'clock that night and that he spoke to Harlow. asking htm what he nan doing there. Harlow re- plied, he said, that he wass on his tray to Ardmore after visiting an oil 'field. R. Barker of Healdton tes- tified that ho was asked to go to the home of Jeff Smith, one of the men In the attack on Carroll, by the Rev. Leon Julius. Baijtist minister ot Healdton He found Smith, who Is a In-other of John Smith, the dear! man. with a bullet wound In his right leg. Smith refused to discuss the mat- his wound, the doctor said, .and Rev Julius cautioned him (the doctovy to suy nothing of the Affair. TeitlfleN no (o statement. Assistant County Attorney Hodge testified thnt J. H Pitts, one of the defendants, had e a verbal element to him Wednesday, the date of his arrest. In '1ileh ho sub- stantiated In ofect the written statement of Gilliam. which Impli- cated Plttg nit the driver nf one of the automobiles in which Gilliam rode to tho field near Wilson, where the reslders gathered. ritts said, Hodge testified, that Oilllnm, Dan Rldpath nnd Ray Beede. defendants, and Sims, the detective who was killed, with him to Wilson, where he went to malte some collections, and from Wilson to the field. and Beerle left his car. Hodge quoted PltU as saying, and he saw them no wore that night. He snH the men who remained in the pasture later received the report that some one had been shot and killed. In a conversation with Jeff Smith while he was In the home of Smith at Heaiaton, wounded, Hodge testified that Smith him he had been nicked up on the street In Healdton and made to go, with took no part in the prosecution the case, Jeft solely in the hands' of Attorney General Freeling. H. H. Brown, brother of Russell Brown, {Continued on Paga 2, Column 1.) WASHINGTON, Pec. 25, De clsion of the Spanish government to release Americans serving In its foreign legion as announced in ca- ble dispatches from Madrid, fol- lowed representations by the state department In behalf of American youths who had enlisted to fight the Moors, It was learned today. Announcement of the decision of the Madrid government made no reference to the return of the bonus paid those soldiers on enlist' ment, and the state department was unable to say whether return the bonus would be made a condition. Many of the Americans have not attained their legal majority, it was said at the state department today and pleas of their relatives for assistance In obtaining their discharge resulted In an exchange of notes between the American government and Spain, in which the Spanish government showed every desire to agree to American wishes. The number of Americans serv Ing with the Spanish foreign legion is less than 100. Many instances of distress among the recruits have been brought to attention. State flclals declined to say would taken to stranded in Spain. the department's department of- what steps aid those i n CASE AUSTIN. Miles, federal' prohibition officer, who wns charged yesterday with mur- der In connection with the death of Peeler Cla.v ton. taxlcab driver, ar- rived In Auitln, trtdaj and Immedl- atc'v made bond of il.OOfi. The oliirr mi-n TT th murder and the rharperl with to murder with Miles wade bond yesterday FORT 'WORTH, Pec. grand 'Jury which has been Investi- gating for 10 days the lynching of Pred Rouse, negro packlnj house strikebreaker, returned Its report this aftenoon without finding any Indictments. The report condemned mob law and recommended that the lynching Investigation be continued by the next grand jury. Rouse was seized by the mob In a hospital, taken to a nearby tree and hanged He had previously been beaten by a mob In the strike district, following the shooting of two strllArs. LAXZLO MIEC-HENY! BE Ml NGARIAN MINISTER WASHINGTON, Pec. gary ts preparing to name-Count Ijitszln Szeohenyl, who In 1508 mar- ried CJUdys M. Vandcrbllt of New Vnrk. Its minister to Washing- ton name wss submitted for approval of the American govcrn- wnt inme time tign and it Is under- stood his appolniment will in cver> ray be acceptabl. NO SPEECHES TOUCHING ON SUBJECT TO BE MADE DURING HOLIDAYS. BELIEVE IRISH PEOPLE WILL URGE RATIFICATION Plan Meetings to- Paw Resolution! Favorable To Peace Agreement EUGENE V. DEBS IS GIVEN RELEASE BY PRESIDENT HARDING DMt ten jear prison aeBtence of Encene V. Ueoa wan romnnnted today I'rnl- dent Harding the coclallst leader irHI be released (.Hitman dar from Atlanta WASHINGTON, Dec. sen tcnce of ten years' imprisonment imposed upon Eugene V. Debs, so- cialist leader, following his convic- tion of violating the espionage act, was commuted today by 1'resldent Harding-. Commutations of sentences of 23 other persons convicted of war- _ time laws were announced By Associated Press. j Dpbs wno Beverai times was a LONDON', Dec. dail candidate tor president, was con- elrcann's adjournnv t of further victed on three counts growing out del.'te on the Irish peace treaty un-jj til 3, although coming as a I a'ppeaf reached the supreme court. surprise here, was considered as tribunal acted on only vorable to the chances for ratifies- tnat dealing with the Interference tion. F-v agreement between the ttiltl recruiting, wljtch the govern contending factions, the mem- ment charged resulted from the bers will deliver no speeches touch- ing on'the treaty during the period of adjournment, nor participate in public meetings at which the treaty Is discussed, but it is the Irish people will get together and agitate ratification. Various agricultural and business associations and civic bodies In Ire- land are said to be planning meet- ings to pass resolutions favoring the treaty and although It Is recog- ________...... ntzed there will some dcclaraM the president. Pardon's arc likely in tions against acceptance, it Is be-T their cases. Of the civilian offend- lieved the large majority will sup- ers released today, about port the stand of Arthur Griffith, jt Is said, were or mem- Michael Collins and their treaty ad- hers of the I. W. W. who had indi- speeches of the socialist leader. The president granted par- dons to five former soldiers effec- tive Christmas day. Debs was ordered released from Atlanta penitentiary by 1'resident Harding along with 23 other per- sons convicted of similar offenses. A number of other cases involv- ing military crimes committed by American soldiers still are await- ing consideration' at the hands of j ruENE v cated a change of views. vocates. The adjournment period will thus be nearly equivalent to a popular referendum. The English newspaper corre-1 spondents in Dublin emphasize the I importance of the speech of Robert Mulcahy, chief of staff of Irish re- publican army, in the dail yesterday, In which he advocated acceptance of the treaty. They thought that his i support, with that of such fighting men as Michael Collins and J. McKeown, assured the adhesion of the republican army throughout the country. Lorn of Some of the correspondents also dwelt upon what they consider Ea- moon Valera's Joss of prestige, At Indicated' by the vote for adjourn- ment, which he w'oods a mile from tosuu a. lera's statement that when ballet through his heart. Maxwell gumed the republican presidency dlft not regard his oath as fettering his adUorts, was. regarded as con- ATOK-A, OKLA.. Pec i3 Uody of Wllfpn. Maxwell. 50, well known itockrnati, was found today had gent bunting. and falling to re- turn, became the object of a search It was thought he had accidentally shot himself when pulling his gun alterably damaging his Influence. Question is raised In England as I through a wire fence to how the adjour .ment will affect j the position of the slnn feiners in DrRNED TO DEATH ___ prison who were lately reported as CLOTHING CATCHES OX FIRE about to receive amnesty and whether the withdrawal of British troops will now be effeited. but nothing hag developed upon whieh to base even conjectures. Meaawhde there hag been some Speculation as to how far a real settlement of ttie Irish trouble would be affected by ratification of the treaty. The Eublln correspond- ent of the Westminster Gazette while hoping and believing that It will be ratified, says that in that case the slnn fein would still have to be reckoned with. Emphasizing that the slnn fein is not satisfied with the treaty, he says it is diffi- cult for the English people to ap- preciate the earnestness of the ex- treme republicans of Ireland, to whose irature tirely alien. a compromise is en- The correspondent quotes a'n un- named observer as declaring there are hundreds of young women and men who will. If the treaty Is rati- fied, retire In bitter disillusionment from any participation whatever In the agreement and may beccme a slnn fein within the slnn fein. The dail eireann may convince them that the treaty was'accepted under du- ress, but this will not destroy the republican movement. The. corre- spondent adds: "Perhaps this Is why one notices so little enthusiasm here people are making the; best of a bud job." BELIEVE DRLAY TVILL AID SUPPORTERS OF THE THEATt LONDON, Dec. adjourn- ment of the dail eireann and the delay In a vote on the Anglo-Irish treaty Is editorially commented on today by the Evening Standard as possibly advantageous to the sup- porters of the treaty and at any rate unwelcome to the anll-ratifl- canonists. The newspaper ex- presses the opinion that the pas- sage of time Is likely to weaken "the Intellectual case" for the re- jection of the treaty and particu- larly to undermine the position of Eamonn Valera, The Tail Moll Gazette and Globe in its comment says that since Mr. dc Valera, opposed the adjournment "we may perhaps assume that the vote of 77 to 44 with which It was carried Is a rough Index of the tlo of strength between himself and his opponents." TWENTY MEN ARRESTED AFTER POLICE CHARGE A PACKING HOUSE CROWD OMAHA. NEB., Deo, men wern arrested today after po- lice charged Into a crowd around street car. the trolley of which had been pulled from Its cable In the packing house 'district where a strike is In progress. The police still were unable to Identify the body of a man fatally near one of the packing ot- flces last night. HARVEY CHURCH GUILTY AND SENTENCED TO DEATH THE VERDICT Of JURY CHICAGO, Dec. Harvey Church, charged with murder of two automobile salesmen. was found guiltjf this morning and sen- to death Church killed the mm. furl Ausmns and Bernard T'.iuirhertv. when thcv delivered a car which he had arranged to buy. ATOKA, OKLA., Dec. ine Wagoner, 7 year old daughter of Joseph Wagoner, an undertaker here, was burned to death late jes- terdav when her clothes caught on fire while she was playing with ma toh es. EXTREMISTS GROUP OF UNEMPLOYED IN ABANDON DISTURBANCE Associated Press. LONDON. Dec. S3. The demon- stration bv London's unemployed. said to have been planned for tn- night in the fashionable west cm! shopping district, was abandoned today. It was' believed the demon- stration was abandoned because the police had learned of tfic plans. By Associated Tress. LONDON. Dec. A-. extremist group of tht> unemployed in London was declared in an announcement bv Scotland Yard today to be planning to create a disturbance today or to- morrow in the west end of London. The west end is London's fashiona- ble shopping dlstilct, which is crowded these days with Christmas and is frequented by num- bers of unemployed who are solicit- ing money Irom the holiday buyers. FLEDGES TO ARKANSAS FARM BURE4L' LITTLE ROCK. Hoc. quarters of the Arkansas Farm Hureau Cotton Growers Cooperative association yesterdav announced that Walter Driver of Mississippi county had signed a contract to market bales through the as- sociation next year. This Is said to be the largest cooperative cotton marketing contract ever signed. C. O. Moser of Dallas, Texan, sec- retary of the American Cotton Growers exchange, was authority for the statement. HP said that the previous record was held by John Wanamaker of South Carolina with WASHINGTON, Presi- dent .Harding has signed the Rus- sian relief bill "which carries ap- propriations of to be. ex- pended under the supervision of the American relief administration. The funds become Immediately available. Gram will be moving Into r. Ithln five day? from the 000 appropriation. Secretary Hoover said upon leaving the White House soon after It was announced the president had signed the hill. The cash .put bv congress In the hands of the irrnln corporation. Mr Hoover paid. that tlie funds will become nvnllable in s manner nnd without lnei-[ to usual government rxpindi-i turcr. i By Associated Tress MALTA, British warships have received orders to proceed; to Kgvpt Immediately. Other units of the British Mediter- ranean fleet arc under orders to leave at the shortest notice. By Associated Trees. CAIRu. EGYPT. Dec. :3 Zagloul Pasha, one of the Ees ptlan nationalist leaders who refused yes- terday to obey an order Issued by the military authorities that he and his chief followers cease all politi- cal activity and leave Cairo, was escorted to the railway station here today b> Bmmu Uoopt. Hi! re- moval was accompanied by some disturbances In thr course of which there was a considerable smashing of Later the plans were changed and Zagloul was trans- ferred to a motor car and taken to Suez. The action of the authorities fol- lowed a fight Thursday near Zag- loul's home in which two of his sup- porters were killed. i CONTINUE INQUIRY INTO CASE OF A MAN FOUND POISONED IN A HOTEL BIRMINGHAM, AI.A Dec. 25 Coroner Tlussum continued his In- vestigation today of the death by of John Rodgers, 40, at a local hotel late esterday. The man was believed bv officers to have committed He formerly lived at Gardner, III and Heavener, Ok la. Mrs Lillian Reef] of Memphis, al legefl companion o' Rodgers. is held as a material witness, Mrs Reeri was not at the at the time IJoclRers Is alleged to Itavp swal- the poison, officers declared She was found at a railway sta- tion some flme after Roiigers' death and. according to the authorities, dc Liared she was leaving town. v oman said Rodjsrers threat- ened to kill himself if che left him. HELD AS A SUSPECT IN CONNECTION WITH BANK ROBBERY AT EXETER, MO. SPRINGFIELD, MO. Dee !5 Bob Amos S7 years old. Is being held In ill.' Ca'-hvillo jail today at fcuspect In connection with the rob liery jesterclaj of the bank at Mo. Amos w ap at Cassville last nifflit nft'r Sheriff Ed Roberts nf harrv t ounty and his posse found the automobila supposed to have been driven by the bandits, wrecked and whandoned, about a mile and a half northeast of Exeter. An overcoat, in the pocket of which were a number of letters addressed to Amos, was found by the officers. authorities are of ic opinion that the robbery of the North Arkansas bank at Everton, Ark last week was staged by the same men that looted the Exeter yesterday. AITHORUE IN I', t. FOR OfTCH EAST INDIES THE HAGT'E, Peo. sec- ond chamber of the-Dutch parlla ment passed by 57 to 18 today the bill authorizing a loan In the Unit- ed States for the Dutch East Indies THREE ARE IK GEORGIA HOTEL FIRE WAYCROSS. GA. Dec. negroes Vfrt; burned to death when a negro hotel was destroyed by fire early today. The origin of the fire has not been deterriined 4. ANOTHER NEW LOW 4 Rf.CORU FOR SICAR NEW YORK. Per. An- 4 other new low record price for the past seven years 0s- 4 in the local raw 4 maiket today s.ileq of fir OfiD, baxs of old crop CuKis were made at 4, 4> I a pound, 41 freighl 4 FRANCE STILL MAINTAINS PO- SITION REGARDING SUB- MARINES. PLAN ANNOUNCED BV SON RE- SULT CONDITION WIFE AND DAUGHTER. IE IS IIY TO SIX MEN FIRE DESTROYS NINE STORES. PICTURE SHOW AND A OARAGE. VIRTUALLY NECESSARY TO BODY WILL BE PLACED SECURITY SAYS BRIAND IN VAULT UNTIL SPRING. nin A AT DUKE, OKLA. Indicates WilKngnott to Cooperate With United Statea At Far Possible. Final Rotting Place Betide Mother And Father In Louiivllla Cctnetsry. Dec. dent Harding la V formal today declared tkjit tke difference of Interpretation "kirk kate arisen over tkr four-power rarlflr treat? are to kli mind "unimportant." By Associated I'resa PARIS, Dec. Brinml has sent Ambassador Jusxcrand in Washington a final ami definite ac- ceptance of the capital ship ratio. France. It Is st.itrd, main- tains her position regarding sub- marines and roost defense shlpn, al- though she is willing to negotiate France Insists that her demands are vitally to her secur- ity. It is Indicated, but Is to cooperate with the L'nittd States as far as possible. SI BMARJNE Ql KSTIOV HCHEOt'I.RD FOR IIIHC WASHINGTON'. Dec of the French delegation to e..pected additional Instructions to auxiliary nma! craft from its home government promised to load to further dlsrusslon todav of the submarine question hv the Wash- ington conference in the mnKie meeting likelv to break a prc- Christmas lull. The further instructions by the. French delegation Had iiot been received up to and it ap- peared Improbable to delegation members that thrv would conie through In time to be of use at the meeting of the full naval commit- tee, set for 3 o'clock. T'nder a ten- tative understanding the discussions, opened yesterday with front-Hie British delegation for abolition of submarines, auto- matically are resumed In ovnnt of. announcement by the French tliati tho had nothing to While the variovis pre- pared for the nftrnmon meeting sug- gestion came frnm thp Italian rep- resentatives through an authorized spokesman, that another conferf-nce hc< arranged soon after the adjourn- ment of the present gathering to take up further question of craft. The Italians thrnuRh their ppoken- man made the pointrfhat a number of nations havlnp MilinmrineR either built, building or nero not represented at tin1 present confer- ence and unless brought Into aRreo ment with the oiilrlt of present gathering, might at fomparntlvelv smalt outlay construct puffH ient submarine tonnage to menace the IJ. KI.A Pec Henrv" WaUeiBon, content with the fullness of Ins life, rested Unlay from bis labors With onlv tho membern of hu immediate present with Ihe hour c-f the scrvhe uounccd. the of the venerable, Kentucky Journalist who dUd here vcMeiilav, was rlii-'i d in A vault in leinnlii until apimij when it will] bol taken home h. Riven a final; resting plac, mother ami father HI Cave Hill cemetery at Louisville of the 
                            

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