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Advocate: Wednesday, December 30, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - December 30, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 236 TELEPHONE HI VICTORIA, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1964 Established IBM 10 Cents Work Halt Cost Asked On Armory Bui Contractor Keeping Busy Contractor for the Army Reserve armory now un der construction on Ben Jordan Street has quoted (he govern ment figures to terminate t h e project but has not been told lo stop work. A spokesman for the Corps of Engineers at Fort Worth con firmed Tuesday that Keeling Brothers Construction Co., of Richardson has been questioned about halting construction. 1 He told Hie Associated Press the contractor was asked how much money could be saved it work terminated. Full Steam The spokesman stressed t h c project is still "proceeding full steam." He said Ihe question was asked at the request of the Defense Department. Speculation thai construction might hall spread after it was learned locally thai the contrac- tor had been asked for a clos- ing figure. There have been rumors to this effect ever since Secretary of Defense Robert Mc- Namara announced a decision lo merge the Army Reserve and the National Guard. No Official Notice An official of the contracting firm, George Keeling is report- ed to have said he doesn't ex- pacl the project to be terminat- ed. A spokesman for tho 8lh Army Corps at Austin told the wire service "our instructions have been lo continue with construc- tion as programmed." Mayor Kemper Williams Jr. also a commanding officer o: one of the Army Reserve com- panies here, has received no of- fical notice concerning plans for the armory. Remains Question Therefore, the fata of the arm- ory remained a question Tues- day as work progressed. The job is about 37 per cenl com- plete, according to the Fort Worth office of the Corps of Engineers. Walls are up on Ihe main structures, and workers were busy placing structural steel for the roofs Monday and Tuesday. The Army Engineers spokes- man at Fort Worth said the De- fense 'Department will make any.decisions pertaining to ter- mination of the project. He said a contractor on a similar proj- ect at San Antonio had been ap- proached with the same ques- tion. CHILDREN'S ZOO GRCWS Pic- tured above arc two American bison, who along with two Texas Long- horns, have joined other animals in the constantly growing Victoria Chil- dren's Zoo in Riverside Park. They have been placed in two new pens built by zoo benefactors. A dedication ceremony was held at the new pens Tuesday afternoon. Pictured below are those who participated in the dedication. They are, left to right, Otto Schuenemann, Park Commission Chairman B. E. Lcissnor Jr., City Manager John Lee, Winston Low, Kerry McCan, Park Commissioner W. R. McCright, Mayor Kemper Wil- liams Jr. and Commissioner Lester (Bugs) Mcis, All except the park and city officials represented donors who assisted in making the new facilities possible. (Advocate Photos) 500 Isolated in Flood Cause Mounting Alarm Situation Improved In Viet Nam Tuesday and saw hopeful signs beginning lo emerge from tur moil in South Viet Nam, No consideration whatsoever lias been given to pulling the United Stales out of Southeast SPREE CONTINUES Rusk Sees New Hope JOHNSON CITY, Tex. 'tax receipts Tuesday after President Johnson and Secre- slugging the treasurer with a tary of State Dean Rusk took a revolv long look al a world of problems spent. Food Supply Bandits Hold Up Gut Off in Buffalo Treasury BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) Two well-dressed gunmen robbed the city treasurer's office of revolver. But most of it can'l be Cong oined the 387 other animals of Victoria Children's Zoo and now make their home in two arge pens provided by zoo jenefactors. City-Owned Lanil He also said the question had apparently been "misinterpret- ed." The armory is being built on land owned by the city. The city 'and Army Reserve reached an agreement in February on a 300 by 585-foot plot east of Ben Jor- dan on what is known as the Smajslrla properly. The site lies between the Port Lavaca Highway and North Street. When the city cleared the way for the contract, Williams in- formed cily council that at any time the government ceases to use the buildings and property it will .revert to the city. Asked about Ihis Tuesday, the major said this was his under- standing, but he would have lo check the contact before he leld Tuesday afternoon at the >ens just north of the other zoo acilitics. The new animals were donat- ed lo the zoo by the National Park Service and came from ts Wichita Refuge. The buffa- ocs, a bull and a cow, are about a year old. Local ranchmen provided wire 'or the pens and material for he sheds. A committee head- ed by Kerry McCan handled :he campaign for funds. Poles ror the eight foot fences were Les could quote menl. the final agree Mr. and iUrs. L. M. Bernhard celebrating their 25tli wedding anniversary today Dennis Vogl having a busy time help- ing his father, Alton, take care of a variety of errands I.eroy Walters refusing to let his customers get the best of him and producing an equal amount of humor Rachel Hranovsky working up an extra big appelile after a deer hunt Gus and Lncy Ball gaining a reputation for being tops on barbecuing cabrito Mrs. Albert Buch horn and son, Barney, of York town in town on a shopping trip Ed Sanderson at work and in a jolly mood Miss Adele Dtpine and Miss Jose phlne Depine of Mission Valley in town to attend lo some bust ness the Hev. and Mrs. T. J of Houston in Victoria for the holidays and guests of the Rev. iiirf Mrs. J. C. Ftlfrer Miss Shirley Dew of Alamosa Colo., finally getting a flight ou of San Antonio to return to her work as lab technician after visit here with her parents, the EMer Dews, and commenting on the change from 88 to 46 below there. Join Zoo Family Town J e e i Keiugees A pair of American bison and Ligrt Co., wo Texas Long horns have Telephone County Electric Co-op. Work- men from the cooperative plac- ed Ihe fence posts. "The only expense to the city was some labor involved in A dedication ceremony was building Ihe new B. donated by Central Power and Southwestern Bell and the Victoria E. Leissner Jr., chairman of the Victoria Parks Commission said. Leissner said lhal future plans are for two more pens to be built nearby for other ani- mals. The new pens are 100 by ICO feet. SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) Viet Cong guerrillas seized a coastal town packed with Roman Catholic icfu- gees and still held it at nightfall Tuesday against attacks by American supported Vietnam esc armed forces. The three Viet U.S. Cong shot down helicopters and wounded six Americans early in the action at Binh Ghia, 40 miles east-southeast of Saigon. One of the helicopters was de- Asia, government authorities reported. They said Rusk told Johnson j (he next few days may see steps in Viet Nam toward establishing a measure of unity in govern- ment so necessary lo the war effort against the Viet Cong Communists. Rival Factions Government in the strategic South Asian nation has been disrupted since the military purged the civilian High Nation- al Council on Dec. 20 and ar- rested some political leaders. But Rusk reported to the President, in a conference at the LBJ Ranch, lhat rival fac- tions are having some second thoughts and more moderation is beginning to appear. The administration regards Viet Nam and the Congo as sources of infection and danger the two outstanding world trouble spots at the moment. African Problem U.S. officials said the way the Congo situation has been going in the last month, the cold war could envelop the whole heart o Africa, If neighbors with outside help continue to violate the Iron tiers and integrity of the Congo because of clashes over person aiilies, these officials say, Afri ea can go sliding down the slope ralher fast. But here, loo, there are some indications of moderation point ing to political solutions. Prime Minister Moise Tshombe is disliked by sonr elements both within the Congo and outside. But the U.S. posi lion is that the Congolese are The loot consisted of in non-negotiable checks and in cash. They missed another cash when a cashier, aware that a holdup was in progress, hid the money in a wastepapcr basket. The robbery, which occurred shortly before a.m., came one day afler the theft of an es- limaled from Iwn Brink's, Inc., guards in Chicago and a week after a lank-truck holdup in Paterson, >J.J. A Brink's truck was to have licked up the Buffalo money at 0 a.m. Police reported lhat one of the gunmen was seen Monday in the reasurer's office, in Cily Hall ipparently familiarizing himsell vilh office operations, City Treasurer Melvin W. EL- iott was walking past the cage of Mae D. Wicks, the chief tell- er, when he realized there was a loldup. One man was pointing a gun al her and had told her: "This s no bull. 1 want the (money) Four Towns 5-SlateToll At Billion "The man turned lo me and pushed the gun into my slom-l gAN FRANCISCO (AP) Elliott said. "At first, 1 .houghl il was a joke. "Then he hit me with a glanc- ng blow to the left side of the lead. I went to one knee." He was not injured seriously. Elliott said the man then leaped about five feel over the counter and rail, grabbed a noney bag containing Monday's ,ax receipts and jumped back. The man and his companion raced from Cily Hall and fled in an automobile reported solen earlier Tuesday. The car was found half a mile away. Patrolman Thomas J. Wrighl pursued the men lo Ihe street and fired one shot from his re- volver. Another man, Remigus Stanton, 41, who had been in City Hall, also raced afler Ihe pair. He said he grabbed one but could nol hold him. He recovered a black felt ha police believed one man wore. A cily auditor said taxpayers whose checks were stolen woulc be asked to slop payment on Ihose checks and write new ones. The checks had been slamped for deposit only. Peo pie who paid their taxes in casl need not pay again, he said. TCU Coed Wins Cotton Maid Title MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) Judy Hill, a 19-year-old sopho- more at Texas Christian Uni- versity, was named Tuesday night IKe 19G5 Maid of Cotton. J- WllU Ul LI1U IIUIH-UUHJl a IIU- attending the dedication! d included Otto Schuenemann of CPU Leissner, City Manager John Lee, Winston Low of the _ Catholic refugees in Bing "re from Communist Cooperative, McCan, Park Com- "rep Mrom missioners W. R. McCriRht and North .Viol Nam Les Meis and Mayor Kemper' wh'lc ctos Williams Jr. 3RD STRAIGHT YEAR County Funds Returned By Citizens Hospital The annual allotment Citizens Memorial Hospital re- ceived from Victoria County for 1964 has been returned, accord- ing lo a report from Commis- sioners Court. This makes the third consecu- tive year the hospital has re- urned its allotment of tax funds. Al the December mecling of the hospital board, it was noted (hat in addition to meeting cash operating expenses this year, improvements amounting to 000 were made lo the labora- tory, X-ray, medical records, Dtisiness office, nursing service, EKG laboratory, tumor clinic and physical theraphy depart- ments. In voting lo return the allot- ment, the hospital board also expressed appreciation for .he loyal service of its 100 em- >loyes and to the community or helping make Citizens Me- morial Hospital self-supporting during the three-year period. garrison and ran off the rest ill In addition to being able (o return the funds, the hospital provided care for indigent pa- ients without reimbursement 'rom the county. The hospital board's action, and Ihe hospital's efforts dur- ng (he year now ending, were commended by Commissioners Court. Cold Front Moves Into State By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A weak cold front moved across the northwest quarter ol Texas Tuesday, clearing skies and lowering temperatures slightly. The norther was a dry one. Forecasts called for cloudiness and mild weather in the eastern half of Texas through Wednes- day. The western half of Ihe slate will gradually become a little cooler under clear to part- ly cloudy skies. Chuckle A playboy U man con- sisting of lop hat, while lies art tales, closed in by road and air, Vietnamese warplanes loosed bombs and rockets on Viet Cong gun emplacements. (The pilots said they believed j they knocked out several guns. Government authorities ex- pressed fear for the safely of the refugees as well as the lownspeople. The Viet Cong :had suffered heavily in an at- lack on Binh Ghia Dec. 5 and believed to be out for re- venge. Another Red band overran a entitled to have the man they want, without outside dictation West Secure In this hemisphere the way it appeared to Johnson and his 5erretary of state Castroism :s waning and being rejected. They are impressed wilh the way such countries as Venezu- ela and Chile have responded to challenges of democratic ways. In the survey at the Tebas White House, differences among the Western alliance were scanned along wilh a picture of government onlposl 15 miles southwest of Saigon. They killed 10 and wounded 13 of the 73-man a two-hour fight. Binh Ghia is near the seaside resort and regional military headquarters of Cap St Jacques, where Lt. Gen. Nguy en Khanh and his general staff planned a conference Tuesday on the dispute about military intervention in South Viet (Sec VIET CON'G, Page 5) First runnerup was Linda Kay Smith of Fairfax, Ala. Cheryl Ann Semrad of Wau- komis, Okla., was named sec- ond runnerup. The other two semitinalisls were Joanne Dockwiller of Huntington Beach, Calif., and Catherine Walker of lound Pond, Ark. The selection climaxed two days of judging through inter- views and luncheons. The se- date contest, which emphasizes amily background and poise as well as beauty, bans bathing Earlier Ihc judges had .rimmed the original field of 20 o ten, including Reha Bristow of Lubbock, Tex., Robin Link of nations that never have seemed Danville, Va., Sandra McElwee more secure or more prosper- ous. Continued discussions in Jan- uary about a North Atlantic Treaty Organization nuclear force, U.S. officials said, may show the way to some kind of consensus on a divisive issue. Relations Improved In general, at the close of this year, these officials say, our relations with both Eastern and Western Europe are somewhat improved. Beside viewing the ups and downs and plusses and minuses in international affairs, Rusk and the chief executive also talked about Lhe Stale of the Union message Johnson will (See RUSK. Page S) of Haynesville, La., Lorann Vlays of El Paso, Tex., and Elizabeth Ragsdale of Memphis The new maid will tour the world as king cotton's good wil ambassador, modeling the laics' n cotton creations on her stops, ON BIKES, VENDORS Ordinances Successful Two recently enacted city or- dinances were described Tues- :lay as having been completely effective during the early tesl periods. Police Chief John Guseman and Tax-Finance Officer Tom L. Davis said the bicycle regis- tration and itinerant vendor or- dinance have all but eliminated complaints in bolh areas. Records Clerk Hazel Houston at police headquarters said that only five bicycle thefts were reported from Sept. 0, when registration started, through Tuesday. For Ihc same period in IMS the department recorded 30 bicycle Ihefls. To date, the department has registered 927 bikes, and the registration program will con- tinue. Chief Guseman said, how- ever, thai Ihc inlenl of Ihe ordi- nance "was nol just lo another law to enforce, but establish a deterrent to bicycle hefts and set up a system to aid in the recovery of vehicles lhat are slolen." Up to now, the program has seen highly successful the chief feels. Registration programs have been carried out at three ele- mentary schools and one inter- mediate school so far, and will he extended lo the olher schools during the coming year. There is no estimate avail- able as lo Ihe number of bicy- cles in the cily. As for the vendors ordinance, Davis said that complaints 'rom housewives about door-to- door salesmen particularly magazine been almost nonexistent since the aw went into effect two months ago. INEiEX M.ky Ciniitiied J MlittU ......8-1 (Television Womtn'i .......1 In addition, Davis said, re- quests for vending permits have been drastically reduced be- cause "the fly-by-nichts have got the word arouna lhat its more (rouble than it's worth lo come here." Primary provisions of the or- dinance do nol apply lo persons who have been residents more than 90 days, but strict licensing and registration rules are ap- plied to Itinerants who are also s eauxM to post substanlia bonds which will forfeited if the service or merchandise being offered is not delivered in satisfactory condition. She succeeds Miss Katy Su Meredith of Andalusia, Ala. Her first official duties wil include a personal apuearanc al the Cotton Bowl parade anc botball game in Dallas Neu Var's .day. Tlicn she will fly to Nev York to be fitted with her fabu ous all-cotton wardrobe, I early January she will go t Amsterdam for a week-Ion iasluon festival sponsored b the Netherlands Colton Institute The maid's 1905 itinerary als includes another trip abroad, Canadian visit and a tour o America's major cities. Whe she concludes her lour she wi pick up Ihe keys lo a snapp new converlible. Canal Road Bids .Opened Garrett Construction Co. ol Corpus Christi was apparent low bidder Tuesday among seven firms seeking the U.S Corps of Engineers contract to )uild an access road to the Vic- oria Barge Canal. G. J. Micheletli, chief of pub- ic relations for IJie Galvcslon Corps of Engineers office, said Garrelt bid on the job as compared with the gov- irnment estimate of le said the actual award of the contract "probably will be made n a week or 10 days" and that construction will get under way about Jan. 15. The contractor will have 15C calendar working days to com- plete the project afler Ihe work order has been Issued. The road will begin near the Missouri Pacific Railroad tracks at Bloomington and run 3.! miles north lo the new cana bridge. The all-wealher 20-foo roadway wilh 4-foot shoulders will be part of an access road planned lo run the entire length of the canal. Other bidders and their bids were as follows: B-W Leasing Inc. of ColJege Station, Fowco Con- struction Co. Inc. of Corpus Christi, McGInnes Bros, of Houston, BtE Con- struction Co. of Corpus Chrisll, Cross Construction Co. of Houston, Charles B. Jones of Boyd, Tex., now blocked a food airlift uesday for the Ihird straight ay as concern mounled for 500 "alifornia flood refugees iso- ated in one of the West Coast's onclicst canyon regions. The critical immediate human iced in a five-slate area bat- ered by Christmas week storm ind flood damage amounting lo 1 billion centered in the Kla- nath and Salmon river canyons iear the California-Oregon bor- 'er, The little Siskiyou Mountain owns of Sawyers Bar, Forks of lie Salmon, Cecilvllle, and Ty iar have been cut off from food upplies for nine days. Puck Train "If we don't get a weather jreak soon, we'll have lo try a lorse and mule oack said William Sowfe, Civil Dc- 'ense director at Yreka. Emergency coastwise ship- )ing was proposed lo prevent laralysis of the lumber and Ishing industries in California's Humboldt and Del Norfe coun- ties. "We're an island here, cut oft rom every said Charles Wood, director of the Office of Emergency Planning's disaster headquarters at Eure- ka. Shipping Plan Wood, one of the federal dis- aster chiefs organizing the mas- sive relief and reconstruction operation in'.California, Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Nevada, said Ihe OEP was working on Ihe shipping plan with the Mari- time Administration. "We're thinking about how we can get commercial supplies in said Wood. The ports of Eureka and Cres- cent Cily once relied on lumber schooners before log and lum- ber hauling shifted lo diesel- powcred trucks rumbling over the region's now shattered high- way network. Workers Wood estimated that community, state and federal workers were mobilized in relief operations in California and Or- egon. Another were work- ing in Washington and Idaho, he said. He said 70 military hclicop- (Scc FLOOD, Page 5) 'TAX DODGE' Lawmaker's Bill Would Plow Under City Dudes AUSTIN (AP) Anyone can predict the 59th Legislature will debate redistricling and teach- ers pay raises, but would you ever think the lawmakers may feud over prohibiting cily dudes from trying their hand at fartn- rcsentative from jlans to introduce mgV Thai's a proposal of Rep. Dick Cherry, Waco, elected to his second lerm in the House. Cherry was one of Ihe more than half of Texas' 181 State Senators and Represenlatives who answered the Associated Press biennial survey of law- makers just before a session. Those answering quickly picked redistricting, taxes, higher edu- cation, teachers pay raises, col- lege tuition increases, statewide water planning, horse race gambling, oil and gas lease pool- ing, sale of mixed drinks, and junior college expansion for tho top 10 Issues, in thai order. Then some legislators an- nounced plans for their own pel legislative proposals. "I said Cherry, "the three pieces of legislation which I will introduce that will attract tho widest public interest are: a constitutional amendment to enlarge the membership of Ihe House to 170 and the Senate to 40; a Texas Farmers Licensing Act which will prohibit non- farmers from farming, and an act authorizing the regulation ol public utilities in rural areas by County Commissioners Courts." Cherry said he thinks his farmers licensing act is needed "because the present unregulat- ed situation allows non-farmers a tax dodge through deliberate ly unprofitable operations, which drive farm prices down anr land prices up." Jesse I, Gcrge, freshman rep horizing a one-county junior college for Yoakum County in Denver City. Rep. George Hinson, veteran 'rom Mineola, also plans to of- :cr three proposed law chang- es. He would create a Texas itate Research Agency to offer service to every slate board and agency, tie also pro- )osed a constitutional amend- (Scc BILL, Page 5) Brownficld, bill an- WEATHER Cloudy lo partly cloudy Wednesday through Thursday wilh occasional light drizzle and considerable nightimc and early morning fog. Southerly winds eight to 18 m.p.h. with occasion- al gusts during the afternoon. Expected Wednesday temper- atures: High 80; low 68. South Central Texas: Cloudy to partly cloudy Wednesday and Thursday with considerable night lirnc and early morning fog. High Wednesday 74-88. Temperatures Tuesday: High 78; low 61. Precipitation: Trace. Total for year: 32.32 inches. Tides (Port Lavaca Port O'Connor Lows at a.m. Wednesday and a.m. Thursday and a high al. p.m. Wednesday. Barometric pressure at sea level: 23.08. Sunset Wednesday. Sun- rise Thursday. Weather extremes for this date: Hlgb 81 In 1922; low 20 in 1917. This intormanon on data from Ihe U.S Vlclorli   

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