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Advocate: Tuesday, December 29, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - December 29, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE Il9th 235 TXLXPUONI HI J-1U1 VICTORIA, TEXAS, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1964 18 Cents Agreement To Adjourn U.N. Near Voting Rights Issue Put Off UNITED NATIONS, NY, (AP) Agreement was report- ed near Monday on adjourning the U.N. General Assembly un- til Jan. 11 and putting off any U.S.-Soviet showdown over vot- ing rights stemming from Soviet refusal to pay peacekeeping as sessmcnls. sources said the way appeared open for filling vacancies on the Security Coun- cil and handling oilier necessary year-end business under the nn- vole truce svhich has been iii effect since the assembly opened Dee. 1. The chief obstacle to a recess had been a deadlock between Mali and Jordan over a Security Council seat to be vacated by Morocco next Friday. The coun- cil, chief peacekeeping organ of the United Nations, would be unable to function without its full 11-nalion membership. Inoi-mal Poll Alex Quaison-Sackey of Gha- na, the assembly president, was reported to have persuaded Mali and Jordan to accept the results of an informal poll of the assembly's 115 members. The loser would withdraw and per- mit the winner to be elected by acclamation. The way open for the assembly to meet Tuesday, approve year-end business and then adjourn while further at- tempts are made to resolve the basic dspute over voting rights. Meeting with Quaison-Sackey on Monday were U.S. Ambassa- dor Adlai B. Stevenson and So- viet Ambassador Nikolai T. Fe- dorenko. Back at Olfice Secretary-General U Thanl returned to his U.N. headquar- ters office for the first lime since he entered a hospital Dec. 4 to undergo Ireatmet for a peptic ulcer. plunged into the negotiations, conferring with Quaison-and -Algerian Ambassa- dor Tewfik head bl the big -Asian-African group. Diplomatic sources said Thanl may make an appeal in the as- sembly Tuesday for voluntary contributions to ease the organi- zation's financial plight. But no progress was made in resolving basic issues in the dispute over refusal of the Soviet Union and other debtor nations to pay the long overdue peacekeeping as- sessments. Wants Settlement The United Stales is willing to settle on the basis of voluntary contributions by the debtor na lions, provided that Thant ac cepts them as sufficient lo avoic any challenge to voting rights under Article 19 of the U.N Charter. The article says that any member two years in arrears in assessments shall lose its as sembly vole. But the Russians wanl the assembly to rule out any men tion of Article 19 in calling for voluntary contributions, and to proceed immediately on a nor mal basis which includes voting Informed sources said tin Russians have (old Thanl Ihe; will be among the first to maki a voluntary contribution, bu have not specified any amount. They owe million in as- sessments for the Congo and Middle East peacekeeping oper- ations, as of Jan. 1 will have lo pay more lhan million in order to avoid being behind two years. The Russians never paid a cent toward cither operation, contending the assessments (Sec U. N.. I'agc 8) Brinks Truck Robbed From Church Rectory lergymen, Guards Left landcuf f ed Snow Hampers Trucker Is Rescue Efforts SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Heavy snow stalled lood relief operations in California's remote Siskiyou fountains region where 500 persons, isolated for a ,veek, are running short of food. Elsewhere, the massive aid effort to supply and re- store flood-ravaged communities in four Western ------------------------------f stales picked up pace and vol- JYIUDDY is how things looked at Weotl, Calif., after, floodwaters receded leaving the lum- ber town completely destroyed. Mas- sive aid efforts to supply and restore ravaged communities in four West- ern states picked up Monday, but heavy snow presented another prob- lem by stalling relief operations in the remote Siskiyou Mountains of California. In. other disaster areas flood waters were receding and clean- up work had begun. (AP Photo) INDEX Abby ............s Edllnrlal Astrology .......2 Gurcn Births Chuff led Crossword Deiiha Spans Vietnamese Ask Civil Power Return SAIGON, South Viet Nam [AP) The leaders Of South Viet Nam's truncated civilian jovernment publicly called on :he armed forces today to hand jack Ihe powers that would make it whole again. Chief of State Phan Khac Suu and Premier Tran Van Huong issued a communique that was widely interpreted here as indi- cating failure in secret negotia- lions on Ihe crisis set off by the military purge Dec. 20 of the High National Council. "For the past week we have made strenuous efforts to find a way to conciliate divergent views, to preserve the solidarity binding Ihe government, the armed forces and the people while saving full civilian gov- ernment to avoid disappointing the people's they said. "We hope that, thanks lo the warm support of the enlire pop- ulation and lo the good will ol the armed forces council, ive will find a fitting solution." But there appeared to be no breakthrough whatever. And in Washington, which holds a stable civilian govern ment is essential to successfu prosecution of the U.S.-backet war against the Viet Cong, offi cials conceded that a program of new U.S. assistance lo South Viet Nam is marking time be cause of the political confusion Authoritative sources therel' said, however, the offer of ex-1 paneled aid estimated at! about million still standsj for transfer when ths govern- ment is in a position lo use it efficiently. They denied it had been can- celed as a means of punishing South Viet Nam's military lead- ers for purging the council, which was a provisional legisla- ture, and reasserting a right lo intervene in governmental af- Two feet of snow fell over- night in the Siskiyou region on he Oregon border where resi- dents of towns on the Klamath and Salmon rivers have been cut off since last Monday night. "They're pretty Alleged peo- >le, but they're beginning lo run Rugged Charged in Fatal Crash Charges of negligent homicid were filed by County Ally. W. Kilgore Monday against Corpus Christ! man in corinec lion with the death of Billy Diekerson Dec. 22 in a Iraffi accident. The driver charged is J. V> Thomas, 47, employed by Nuec es Vacuum Service of Robstown He was not injured in the fata accident, which occurred at .road intersection 18 miles sout of Victoria on Ihe Refugio High ihort of said William iuwle, Civil Defense director at Yreka. Several helicopter pilots took off Monday trying to make food drops at the isolated towns. All vere turned back by the thick- ening snow. "The forecasters say we may iavc a better chance 'tomorrow. They say the snow may keep on ror 24 to 36 Sowle said. Frank Dryden, deputy director of the Office of Emer- gency Planning, flew lo Arcata n Humboldt County as Presi- dent-Johnson's personal disaster relief director. SI Billion Figure Dryden will direct organizing [he federal support for Ihe gi- ;antic reconstruction and repair job required by damage loss to the highways, bridges, f and buildings which may reach aillion in California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho. ;The OEP announced a pre- 5220 million for 14 Northern Cal- ifornia counties designated as a disaster area. Gov. Edmund G. Brown added seven more north (See SNOW, Page 8) way. Diekerson, 33 father of Iv, small children and a Union Ca jide operator, resided at' 20 Scarborough Drive. The complaint was filed wit :he county attorney by Highwa Patrolman Dslton Meyer, wh had investigated the acciden Meyer said Dickerson's struck the right side of Library Busy On Reopening The Victoria Bronte Pub! Library reopened Monday newly enlarged and remodel1 quarters and promptly had tl largest number of books chec cd oul for any one day that c damage of librarian could remembe The New Year's holiday sche lile calls for Ihe library to closed Thursday and Frida but il will be open for its usu hours on Saturday. :ruck driven by Thomas as th [ruck was crossing from 0 I San Antonio River. Road on Farm Road 445 known local as the McFaddin cutoff. Kilgore indicated Monday a ternoon that bond for Thoma would be set at LA Priest Chooses Exile In Dispute With Cardinal Chicago Haul Undetermined CHICAGO (AP) Three asked gunmen bound two his cardlna ricsts and a guard in the recto- facial issues. f. of a suburban Norridge lurch Monday night, escaping ith what officials said could be large amount of money from a rinks, Inc., armored truck Brinks officials said (he hau may have included heavy hristmas collections from su- ermarkels and stores. Police aid the holdup men apparently professionals. The three men left a secom Brinks guard handcuffed anc ealen near the truck, which 'as abandoned in a cemetery ear Ihe Divine Savior Roman Jatholic church, scene of the oldup. Haul It was Uie second (heft of a money truck from a church vilhin a week. Last Monday, three gunmen vearing Halowcen masks b'oum our priests and escaped with that was in a truck in e iimilar robbery at a Palerson J.J., church. Palerson police expresses doubt that (lie two robberie. were related. However, a policeman told a newsman, "The three bandits oday went to school on the Pat- erson robbery." Lid Of Secrecy Sources said two boys ques- ioned had been taken to police lesiiquarters for ifurther.-in.ler- rogation. But police officials, who clamped a tight lid of se- crecy on the investigation, re- 'used to comment further. Joe W. Tottingham, assistant manager of Brinks, Inc., in Chi- cago, said, "The truck was out all day and we don't know how much money was in the track." fie saidthe money was insured. The truck apparently had completed its pickups for the day. Account Given Chicago robberty Detectives Joe Ahrens and Curt Burial! gave this account after inter- viswing guard Robert Jphnslen, of Alsip, in Resurrection Hospital: The truck usually gets, to Divine Savior church between and p.m. Monday nighl it arrived two minutes after 6 Johnston walked into the recto ry and became apprenehsive when it was dark. He saw the Rev. Walter Mor- ris, 58, pastor of the church (Sac ROBBERY, Page 8) lev. John V. Coffield, a Roman LOS ANGELES (AP) Thelfield said he was ordered, to Catholic priest, said Monday he s going into "self-imposed ex- Chicago to protest Cali-' ornia's abolition of so-called air-housing laws and being told >y his cardinal not to speak on icial issues. Father Coffield, 50, told a news conference that James ;ardinal Mclntyre, 'Roman latholic archbishop of Los An- ;eles, had lold him "I should lot speak on race." A layman, Emit Seliga, presi denl of the Catholic Human Re- ations Council .of Los Angeles, called the news conference at a downtown hotel so Coftield could amplify a farewell state- ment read to nearly par- Ishoners and others yesterday. In that statemenl Father Cof- :ake a five-month "enforced silence, vacation" from California ear- lier this year because he had spoken out against Proposition par! of, the continuing evil of "I also accept my exile as a solution lo an impasse between my Cardinal and myself." 14. This measure, approvedl The Chancery, headquarters Mov. 3 by California volers, gives property owners absolute discretion in choosing buyers and renters of their property. "Scacely anyone knew of the shocking way I was ordered out of California after I had spoken out against Proposition Ihe priest said in his statement. "I was ordered out on June 22nd and was not allowed.back until Nov. 15th... "ON Saturday, Nov. 14th, 1 was ordered lo maintain a si- lence on racism. I chose instead a self-imposed exile from Hie diocese as a gesture of protest against, and rather than be a of the archdiocese, issued a statement Monday that said "no administrative discipline has been imposed by the arch- diocese of Los Angeles on Fa- ther John V. Coffield. He re- quested permission lo be absent from his parish and the arch- diocese, and this permission was granted upon his. petition. "His departure from this area was arranged through regular processes. "Portions of the statement issued in his name, however, demonstrate that those who con- centrate excessively on a par- (Sce I'HIEST, I'ngc 8) Port Council Objects to Drain Plan By MARY BAKER PHILLIPS Advocate Staff Writer PORT LAVACA City Coun- 1 Monday night approved a otion authorizing City Man- Jer Herman Ladewig to wrile :e directors of Drainage Dis- ict No. advising the dis- ict the council is not happy ith the proposed drainage improvement and flood contra roject planned for' Lynn's ayou and asking that a further udy be made of an alternate oute. The action followed a lengthy iscussion of the district's pro project after hearing equest from W. W. Browne ngineer with Alcoa and resi en I of Brook Hollow Drive, pro esling (he feasibility of the Today's Chuckle There is no indigestion worse' than that caused by having lo eat your own words. LBJ HEALTH GOOD Gerald Lenz ending up with two tickets lo the Cotton Bowl game and can be contacted at HI 5-1174 W. S, Stanton Availing for a norther so that he can wear his ChrisImas gift Felix entering DeTar Hospital with glandular fever Airs, G. L. Henderson gel- ling a Christmas card with only her street address and zip code, Dr. C. S. arriving at but no town listed Bingham always hunting camp with a newspaper 'and trading it for a cup of cof- fee 'Former Victorian Mrs. Mary GUlUand in town from Houston lo visit with family and friends El Orana admitting he was having a difficult time catching anyone at home Jviiss Gramann having her share ol automobile No Quotas Seen On Meal Imports WASHINGTON tary of Agriculture Orville Free- man said Monday it will not be accessary lo impose quotas on tmporls of meat in 1965. No appreciable increase in imports is expected, he said. Legislation passed by Con- gress this year directed the President lo impose import re- striclions if there was prospect of a big increase in foreign supplies which could depress prices in this country. Freeman said in a slatcmcnt lhal imports in 1965 are expect- ed fo total about 733 million pounds. This compares with 1> in 1963, and an esti- mated 71B million this year. One reason foreign supplies are being reduced Is' that sev- eral major world exporters Australia, New Zsland, Ireland and to volun- tary reductions in exports to New Tax Chief Named By Johnson at Ranch JOHNSON CITY, Tex, (AP) President Johnson picked a new chief tax collector Monday, iored over the budget to spend lie money that comes in and got a; briefing at dusk on the whole international situation. All this came shortly after his Vo. t doctor had pronounced the President in excellent health and predicted he'll withstand the strains of the next four years in the While House "in oustanding fashion." And the physician disclosed, in passing, that Johnson is a bourbon-and-branchwatcr be- fore dinner man. Sitting in a chaise lounge of aluminum and gold plastic on the front lawn at Ihe LBJ Ranch his pet beagle "Him" lying at his feet Johnson announced to newsmen that he has picked the chief counsel of the Internal Revenue Service, Sheldon S. Cohen, lo be the new IRS com- missioner. He said Mitchell Rogovin, as- sistant to the Internal revenue monetary affairs, succeeding Robert V. Roosa who is resigni- ng at the end of the year. The President also produced three, Ihick loose-leaf books commissioner, will replace Co- 7-21 Wednesday hen as IRS chief counsel.' He announced, too, that Fred- erick K. Deming, president of the Federal Reserve Bank in Minneapolis, will become under secretary oi the. Treasury {or WEATHER Cloudy lo parlly cloudy Tues- day through Wednesday. South- erly winds eight to 18 m.p.h. with gusts to 25 during the afternoon. Expected Tuesday icmperalures: High 78; low 55. South Central Texas: Cloudy :o partly cloudy Tuesday and Wednesday wilh no important :emperature changes. High Tuesday 72-86. Temperatures Monday: High 75; low 44. illed with suggestions on wha should go into his State of th Jnion message and showe. Ihem to newsmen. The suggestions came from 5C government agencies, Johnso said. They take up thousands o lages and obviously not all o :hem will get into the Stale o he Union message he presents !o Congress and Ihe nation Jan 4. O'Connor Lows al a.m. and p.m. Tuesday wilh highs at p.m. Tuesday and a.m. Wednesday. Barometric pressure al sea level: 29.98. Sunset Tuesday, Sunrise Weather extremes for this date: High Bl in 1921; low 25 in 1917, This iniiirmancm' based on data learn UK U.S Victoria Burtui: The sun was dipping dpw across Ihe Pedernales Rive while Johnson talked wilh re [Mrters and just as they wer leaving, John A. McCone director of Ihe Central Intell Agency arrived at th ranch by air to brief Johnson o ntcrnational affairs. While House officials sai Tides (Porl Lavaca Port there wae nothing unusual abou this, lhat McCone merel slopped off in Texas on Ihe wa from hU home on the Wes Coast to Washington. But Johnson has been bearing down on foreign policy que tions, and Tuesday Secretary Stale Dean Rusk and McGeorg Bundy, special presidential a sistant for national security a fairs are coming lo Ihe rancl Ihe President said. "They will review wilh me, LBJ, Fife 8) Ian. Better Solution He asked thai the council use s influence and interest in th roject to encourage a better nd more realistic solution to drainage problem than IB district's current proposal [e suggested the council con ider investigation of the feasi ility of diversion of the walei bove the Brook Hollow subdi ision running laterally to th ay. Ladewig reviewed the pro osal presented by Philip Graz er of San Marcos, Soil Conser 'ation Service watershed plan u'ng chief, at a joint meeting f the district commissioners members of the council an iroperty owners of Lynn Bayo irea Nov. 20, showing- how th iroject would affect the prop :rty in the area along Lynn' 3ayoii within the cily limits. Full Responsibility Grazier explained the distric las responsibility of maintainin he entire project of approx mately acres located from six mile boundary along Cor 'US Christi highway to the Vic oria Counly line. This1 include Chocolate, Little Chocolate an .ynn's Bayou walershed in Ca loun County. The SCS slate ts plan would not divert an water from any other watei shed. It would involve widenin t to a six foot maximum an will be a natural drainage pa "rn, i Ladewig stated the plan 1 now being prepared in tentative 'orm and will be submitted ater to the district commission- ers for review and approval. During (he discussion the council displayed the storm drainage plan in the master plan prepared by Caudill, Row- (See PORT, Page 8) IT LEAST 4 Soviet Sub Ports Reported in Cuba NORFOLK, Va. (AP) on WTAR-TV said in a copy-! ight broadcast Monday it has1 earned of the existence of at east four Soviet submarine ases in Cuba. The broadcast, written by ohn Ennis, the station's mill- Port Lavaca Man Charged  ond set by Judge Frank Kelly n a bearing held in justice cour icre Monday morning. ftfrs. Carotolta Torres, 31, anc John Anthony Torres, 11 moth er and brother of the victim who were hospitalized at Chami Traylor Hospital Friday as a re suit of their injuries, were re ported in good condition Mon day afternoon. Her father, wh  a r t of prospective jurors should result in an appreciable saving in loss of time in process- ing those appearing for jury irvice. ft was emphasized that pros- pective jurors are not expected to exercise their rights of exemption unless absolutely compelled lo do so. "We the three judges pointed out, "that the citizens of Victoria County will want to discharge their duly for jury ers elected lo four-year terms service if at, all possible, and are County Com. Pat Moore of will find jury service most in Precinct I, Com, W. S. Cara- way of Precinct 3, Sheriff M. W; Marshall, Counly Ally. Whay. land W. Kilgore, Tax Assessor- Collector H. Campbell Dodson, Dist. Judge Joe E. Kelly said that he and Dist. .Judge Frank H. Crain probably will be sworn In far new terms at (he same time. teresting. We are further con' fident they will follow Ihe in- structions and only exercise the right of exemption whan ab- solutely necessary." The instructions will specify thai those eligible for jury serv- ice must be citizens of the stale and county who are qualified lo vote, above the age of 21 I years, although -a poll tax Is not required for jury service; prospective jurors must be of sound mind and of good moral character, not having been con- victed of a felony or under in- dictment, be cither a freeholder or a householder, able in read and write English, and not hav- ing served as a juror for as long as six days during the preced- ing six months. Justifiable excuses for those claiming exemption from jury service may be recognized in Ihe following instances: Citizens over 65 years of age, state or federal officials, minis- ters of the gospel, physicians, pharmacists, dentists, road over- seers, school teachers, law- yers and wives of lawyers, mor- ticians, railroad station agents, conductors, engineers and fire- men, members of organized fire companies, registered nurses, practical and vocational nurses, agtnts and palrolmen engaged in forestry protection, females who have legal custody of chil- dren under the age ef 10 years, and the wife of any man sum- moned to serve on the same Jury panel. These exemptions may be claimed only by the person ap- pearing in open court before Ihe (See JURY, Page   

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