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Advocate Newspaper Archive: December 23, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - December 23, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 230 TELEPHONE HI i-Ull VICTORIA, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1964 18 Cents U.S. Raps Army Rule In Viet Nam Terse Note Strongest Yet WASHINGTON (AP) -'.-The United States warned South Viet Nam's restive military leaders Tuesday night that continued U.S. suppprt is based on exist- ence of a Saigon government "tree of improper inter- ference." the terse U.S. statement, was issued with President Johnson's knowledge and approval, after South Viet Nam's armed forces commander, Gen. Nguyen Khanh, criticized U.S. opposi- tion (o military domination o( the civilian government. Threat Seen Stale Department Press Offi- cer Robert J. McCloskey, in making the statement public, declined to say whether the tough wording amounted to a U.S. ultimatum that there would be a cutoff in U.S. aid if the South Vietnamese military do not leave the civilian govern- ment alone. However, the statement seemed to come the closest yet to hinting such a possibility. It also fully endorsed efforts of U.S. Ambassador Maxwell D. Taylor to restore civilian au- thority over the South Viet Nam military. Essential Condition The statement, read at a news conference, said: "I and others in the depart- ment have had inquiries grow- ing out of allegations critical of our ambassador in Saigon as well as of the U.S. Government. "Ambassador Taylor has been acting throughout with the full support of the U.S. Government. "As we have repeatedly made clear, a duly constituted govern- ment exercising full power on tile basis of national unity and without improper interference from any group is the essential condition for the successful; pro- secution of the effort to defeat the Viet Cong and is the basis motion. for support for that effort. Policy Hit "This is the position Ambas- sador Taylor has been express- ing to Viet-Namese leaders." McCloskey said the statement speaks for itself and he would not characterize it as an ultima- tum. However, the U.S. officials said the statement was in re- sponse to an order of the day broadcast by Gen. Nguyen Khanh in Saigon Tuesday night which referred indirectly to the United Stales. Khanh stated the military has the right to step in to settle di- sputes affecting the civilian government of Viet Nam and called on the army to face its common enemies Commu nism and colonialism in any form. The broadcast was regarded here as an implied criticism of the United States. It was apparent that U.S. offi- cials did not expect Khanh to remain long as armed forces commander. But there was support here for the government of Premier Tran Van Huong to try to work out differences with young mili- tary officers who purged the (Sec RULE, Page 10) SAN DIEGO, Calif. (AP) A strong earthquake rumbled ihrough Southern California and ts neighbor, the Mexican state of Baja California, at p.m. Tuesday. There was widespread minor damage. This coastal city of appeared hardest hit. Walls were cracked, Christmas tree But old timers said this was one ornaments and pictures shaken down, and a chimney toppled. In the Mexican resort town of Ensenada, 60 miles south, two )late glass.store windows were shattered. The rolling temblor was felt, barely, in Los Angeles 120 miles icrth. More than a score of Southern California communi- .ies reported varying degrees of Mary Helh Cory, daughter of Sir. and Mrs. It. H. Cory receiving congratulations on killing her first deer, a. seven- pointer Ernest Yamin feel- ing more like visiting with friends after his recent stay in the hospital Charlie Brandcs taking care in crossing a busy street and explaining he was too young to get crippled up Jimmy Stofer in a holi- day mood Jim McMillan enjoying the squirrels on De- Leon Plaza and astounded to discover that they cache their nuts away Billy Bayer through shopping and ready for Santa .Mrs. Ballon Meyer nursing a sprained finger for the holidays Joe Lopei in town on business '.Mrs. B. B. Carnes enjoying visiting the toy department Mm, Rather looking forward to her 16-day vacation as a school teacher and planning to make good use of the time Janle Henderson and Mrs. James Warner making a coffee break purchase the Thomas E, Kullers moving back to Victoria from Longview and happy to be back Floyd WhlUey dressed for the type of work he does on his day off Frank Ortii in a heated discussion on foot- ball, the prospects for the bowl games, and last week's competi- tions Fred Laior out try- ing to take eclipses with a new but not succeeding be- C.IIIM of cloudy YOUNG TURKS Gen. Nguyen Clianh Thi, left, and Gen. Nguyen Van Tliicu, two of the nine "Young Turks" who staged South Viet Nam's latest coup d'etat, were warned Tues- day by the Uniled Stales that civilian authority should be restored to the government there. The high-ranking military leaders refused to release prisoners taken during the coup de- spite a warning that the U. S. might "review" its program of aid to the anti-Communists if they failed to do so. DAMAGE LIGHT Strong Temblor Hits California Ruling Hits Railroad Crew Law AUSTIN, Tex. 1909 stale law requiring five-man crews on freight' Irains doesn'l affect modern diesel-powered trains operating in interstate commerce, Dist. Judge Herman Jones ruled Tuesday. The decision was a setback o railroad brotherhoods, who nvoked the law in an attempt to halt lay-offs of diesel fire- men, after a federal arbitration if the strongest San Diego board said railroads could dis- shocks in memory. The quake area extended across the border into Mexico, down into and including the Gulf if California. Springs, to the north across a mountain range, residents re- ported that the shock caused ipples in swimming pools. The area east of here the Laguna Mountains and he broad, fertile Imperial Val- ey Is no stranger lo earth- quakes, and most are felt here. In the Imperial Valley to the east, a newsman said it lasted about a minute, and "my chair moved. I thought I was being he said. Seismologists said the quake apparently was centered west and south of San Diego in sparsely populated desert- mountain area. Residents were just returning Toni lunch in downtown San Diego when the shock hit, rock- ing buildings severely. At the Civic Center, workers out pf offices into halls. Some shouted in alarm. Fire alarms wenl off all over town, but there were no major fires. Scripps Hospital reported that jeds rolled on their casters, At Ihe police building, two beams were dislodged and an 8-inch wide crack appeared in one wall. A fire station wall cracked so badly the building was closed. Twenty-six cracks were reported in the wall of the State Building cafeteria. Mike Fitzgerald, sitting at unch on the 24th floor of a bank Building, gave this description: ''I was sitting right under a big chandelier when the quake be- gan and it began to tinkle light- ly. The tinkling got louder and soon the chandelier was moving up and down. By that time the suilding was doing a slow roll, ike a ship al sea. It was the eeriest moment I've lived Ihrough. Al Ihe deserl resort of Palm Post Office To Close for Weekend The post office will be closed Saturday as well as Friday with ie no local deliveries to be made either day. Postmaster Paul 3crthelot said Tuesday. Deliveries will be made Satur- day on rural routes only, Berth elot said. Incoming mail will be irocessed, but no deliveries >ther than special delivery will >c made until Monday. WEATHER Clouds and fog diminishing >y mid-morning, becoming part- y cloudy Wednesday afternoon, with fog and low clouds again Wednesday Soulherly winds 10 to 20 m.p.h. Expected Wednesday temperatures: Low 58, high 74. South Central Texas: Fair and mild Wednesday through Thursday with considerable night and early morning fog. ligh .Wednesday 70-82, Precipitation Tuesday: .01. Total for year: 33.32 inches. Temperatures Tuesday: High 71, low 56. Tides (Port Lavaca -Porl O'Connor Highs .at a.m. and p.m., lows at p.m. and a.m. Thursday, Weather extremes for this date: Low 22 in 1929, high 82 in 1921 and 1933. This inturmautm on data from Ihe U.S Weather Bureau Victoria 2 SHOPPING DAYS Till miss firemen with under two years seniority. No Comment The stale attorney general's office, xyhich brought the suit, lad no immediate comment as lo a possible appeal from Jones' decision. But Earl Jergins, leg- slalive representative of the Fire- Brotherhood of Railroad and Enginemen, we'll appeal to the U.S. >reme Court if necessary." .londay night when it exceeded 'olume during Christmas, 1963, Berthelot said. An increase in mail volume, which includes both incoming and outgoing, of approximately 8 to 10 per cent over last year is anticipated. Victorians and others in the irea using the post office were commended by the postmaster or mailing early. Berthelot not- ed that activities at the windows remained steady, with nobody laving to wait long for service. "And except for packages that couldn't be delivered because nobody was at home, everything vas delivered every day." The ncreascd use of Zip Codes by many people also speeded dc iverics, he added. said Su Mail volume reached Ihe poinl and two brakemen. Railroads say no fireman is needed on diesel locomotives. A federal arbitration board ruling, effective last May 7, said railroads could dismiss un- necessary firemen. Jergins said since the ruling about Tex- as firemen have lost their jobs. Railroads place the figure at less than 200. Jones said Ihe case before liim involved only trains in in- terstate commerce, but "I am sure 90 per cent are within the meaning of Ihis." Today's Chuckle Christmas gifls are divid- ed into two classes Ihose you don'I like and Iliose you don't get. Car-Truck Smash Fatal to Victorian Dickerson 8th County Road Victim Tragedy Ends limiting Trip By JAMES SIMONS Advocate Staff Writer Billy J. Dickerson, 33-year-old Jnion Carbide operator and the 'ather of two small children, Became the county's eighth traf- fic fatality for 1964 Tuesday when his car and a bobtail tank ruck collided at section 18 miles i :oria on the Refugio Dickerson, who rej" Scarborough Drive, lounced dead on arrival local hospital following p.m. broadside collision. The truck driver, J. 1 Thomas, 47, of Corpus Chrisli, f] was not injured. He is employ- ed by Nueces Vacuum Service of Rpbstown. Crossing Highway Highway Patrolman Meyer said Dickerson traveling north on Highway 77 toward Victoria when struck the right side truck which was crossing from Old San Antonio River Road onto Farm Road 445. The inter- section is commonly known to Victoria County resic1- the McFaddin cut-off. Meyer said the car s gasoline saddle tank.......... the door and the tandems after Dickerson made a futile attempt to avoid a collision by swerving to He said some 70 feel of skid marks were left by the victim's late-model sedan which was demolished.The 1 tained between damage. Jones .said' he was 'notifying attorneys Tuesday of his deci- sion to grant a summary judg- ment in favor of Southern Pacif- defendant in the suit. Numerous other rail com- panies intervened on the side crossed of Southern Pacific. Railroad brotherhoods entered Ihe case on the attorney general's side. Full Crew The so-called "full crew law" requires freight trains operat ng outside yard limits to have an engineer, conductor, fireman rrK, Hunting Trip --on, whose fat Dickerson, owns a car lot, was returning to Vic- toria from a quail hunting trip in Refugio County. He had hunted on with Dennis Williams ria, a brother to Maj per Williams Jr. Funeral services wil at 4 p.m. Wednesday _. _._ First Presbyterian Church with tor of St. Francis _I.._..r_. Church, officiating. Burial wil; be in Memory G the direction of ruth Funeral Funeral Home. Survivors Listed Surviving are his Gail H. Dickerson; children, Dennis and Richard and his parents, all of Victoria Dickerson was the Victoria resident (o c county traffic accident days. Homer Wilburn, (See ACCIDENT, Page 10) TOYS FOR CHRISTMAS Heads of many families picked up toys for 858 children Tuesday in the annual toy program held at the old Masonic Hall building on Forrest Street. The toy campaign is an annual one conducted by VFW Post 4146, the Victoria Fire Department, the Sal- vation Army plus aid in the dis- tribution by Ihe .Victoria Alliance.1 From left are the Rev. R. H. Mathison, of the Ministerial Alliance; Fireman Rudy Valenta, W.'H. Mc- Manis, who has been VFW chairman of the project for the past several years, and Fireman Sam McCormick. Firemen and VFW members did most of Ihe repair of the toys in a. program that goes on all year, EVERY Give 88 Reason for PAT it like? iScott, Staff it's the kids standing spor it like for a kid wailing for their a fortune in a and eager, but pennies, a kid who has very hard lo be patient little in his lifetime sh year-old and the children, hth has had even less lo give, a kid who has never known the real meaning of then it's the kids fanning out Ihrough Ihe store, up one counter and down the other, begin for the selected Tuesday tail tank id inter-of what's it like lor a kid ike that to be turned loose with S in a big variety store three days before Christmas? And what's it like for SS hurry to buy but determined :o buy wellj and probably as discriminating and selective as any customers the store we! Later, Chris tma Jaycee I be turned loose in the o >d at and at the same lime, mosl of all, it's the as pro-al at a ng of them told to buy whatever hey want, but just spend that linger at the toy department, wistful and enchanted, and then move slowly down a t assorted The Cl of the Victoria and buy a new pair .city'. J. Chamber of or jeans instead, was Chrisli, out Tuesday night when hey sponsored their know they need clothes more than which ha lour, an annual if they do buy a toy, en for kids who for some other but wouldn't have much the was m for being very exciled made it worth ever u on was tiway it cost said S his of the ng from er he nown to en Is as ruck the Car For ms Victoria successful, the city District will its meeting Monday conli er to collect the1 in e 70 right on collecting its -W. Sandhop tax the t by automobile taxes, for the aw an of Victoria's action he had "no idea" how Tick the levy! school district collects C. and T. Ragan Jr., president through the personal the cr Dodson VISD's Board of lax. eft front had can't speak for the rest of the board, but I don't did say, however, that the otal personal properly to be 112-unit pe we shouldn't keep on includes other items such is merchants' inventory and inch ming po .her, Joe cal used to have a good man collecting the taxes, and we're getting a high percentage of the furniture, cattle, airplanes, scats and even cash in the bank, wings in about million a fear, e for occu conlraclo Owners ting school district, the Tax Milfel the county hired Campbell Dodson says S. ant a Terry of.Auslin about discussed the proposition F of Victo-or ago in a concerted campaign lo enforce the away with personal property taxes on automobiles m Ihe soutl personal automobile with members .of the be the effort was only commissioners court, hob at of the court have nas irch wiU vton an altitude toward the in the f A Itix rt ner, for says the county's personal property automobile p is a new rial represent total s is Tex. 'about and his Connally made a that about 75 per cent for highway safety total has been collected the long years. He recognizes( ife, holiday, during that the city's action the two Department of Public Safety predicts 105 will die in the tax might have a marked effect on future nicnaru by the Deaths second die in a In ask all Texans lo exerl every effort lo make Ihis a safe and happy holiday for 51, their families and ge the governor said in a special safety Harvest Below '68 in Tex. CAP) It's not educ growers harvested figure out what Texas Iheir alloted acreage think will raise bringing in a lighter fuss during the 50th in 1963, the U. S. of Agriculture said Is the the s the Associated rai r its year-end summary of Tevas agriculture, the department said cotton, each of the 31 Senators and 150 representatives a questionnaire and invited them to grain, corn and pecans did not measure up to last year's 10 top issues of the coming session. The questionnaire suggested 31 subjects and left space to add even f the first 75 questionnaires returned ,68 lawmakers as one of (he top 10 Issues and 53 said it was the No. 1 subject. Nine others has been it In unnal and other means of lighting contest revenue got about ti by The Advocate number of votes for c Power and 10 category but most with Ihe winners to would be No. 2 behind ad -air in 1 behind in the top 10 you will be disclosed were' higher education holfd aild teachers pay k. t ii of picttrei o( the ''lawmakers listed n dhnUyi. First prize tuition increases, flM, with other planning, horse of ud two of oil and gas t to sale of mixed out junior college expansion out the lop 10, In that the 17 the contest foUowtaj? subjects getting judging of the attention as major the session included of vocational and chairman of (tie yuuth committee of the "I don't way lo know of a spend the The shopping lour was only ming of a big evening 88 children, who are with the help of the Ifare agencies, the Jaycees held a is party for them at Christmas program for a movie and dinner, ivo already been held. The entire project cost about us wish we could do Scott said. Motel A contract for construction of million-plus Holiday Inn the Houston Highway awarded of Dodson Bros., Arlington, re- said, construction Is ming pool. and other facilities. "We expect it ready by June ths d. Owners are Dana and Laurel- The motel will be located on outh side of the highway the Ben Wilson Street In- !llOn. It has been planned so that idilional units may be added the future. Also plumed near the motel major oil company lalion. INDEX .....S rdlrorlll I .....2 Gorcn.........U .....2 Marked.........J ,..IM7Sporlj ........I HI Comics ..........II Television 2 .....1! Women1! cal education lo fight illiteracy, lily participation in health and retardation is, expansion of the Kerr-Hills act for medical help to the aged, judicial and other raises, traffic safely tnd (See ISSUE, Page 10) TUB VICTORIA HP ,fi ffin GJIratmaa b? mm (KK Your children will cherish hnzutlful Christmas Record and booklet for many years, 12 Christmas favorites to home with, matfe MINUTE At our office: 1 E, Cmtifeiiw SiiuMiored by: THE TlttOlU UTKATC   

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