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Advocate Newspaper Archive: December 19, 1964 - Page 1

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Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - December 19, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 226 TtLIPHONB ID (-MM -VICTORIA, DECEMBER 19, 1964 14 Grand Jury Indicts 35 In Felonies 45 Charges Are Returned By JAMES SIMONS Advocate Staff Writer Victoria County Grand Jurors Friday returned 45 indictments against 35 suspects in felony criminal cases including five against James Lee Gibson, 33, of 2304 N. Depot St. The construction company employe who was suspected in 22 break-ins in Victoria County, and that many more in five other area counties, was named in four counts ot burglary and one alleging burglary and felony theft. Gibson was arrested on the morning ot Nov. 6 near the Griffith Drive-East Street in tersocUim to climax an inten- sive search by Victoria County officers and those from Jack son, Goliad, Calhoun, Refugio and Wharton Counties. On Parole Gibson was accused of en lerjng mostly small groceries and liquor stores over a two- month period. He had been re leased on parole from the slate penitentiary in April after serv ing a term for burglary. An indictment alleging pos- session of mnrijuana was re turned against Perfecto Perez Jr. ot 301 W. Murray St. Perez was arrested on Oct. 3 at a Port Lavaca Drive tavern by City Patrolman Raymond Sibert who recovered two hand- rolled marijuana cigarettes from the suspect's left front shirt pocket. Sibert made the arrest after receiving a tip from a nightwatchman. Hot Check Charge Another indictment was re- turned against M. T. Atzen- hoffer who is accused of passing a hot check and felony theft. Alzenhoffer is charged with passing a worthless check on Aug. 19 at the HEB Food Store in the Village Shopping Center. He was returned from Lulibock this week to face a charge on which the indictment is based. Gibson, Perez and Atzenhoffer were the only persons in cus- tody when the indictments were returned. Identities of the other persons indicted will be released by the sheriff's office later. Breakdown A breakdown of the indict- ments shows two alleging as- sault with Intent to murder, one forgery and passing- a pre- scription, two for forgery of endorsement, two 'alleging theft from the person and rob- bery by assault. r Others included possession of niarijuana, one; driving while intoxicated, second offense, five; forgerj' and passing and habitual criminal counts, one; burglary, felony Uieft and ha- bitual criminal counts, one; burglary, felony counts and habitual criminal counts, one; burglary and habitual criminal counts, one; failure to stop automobile and render aid, one; burglary and felony theft, six; burglary of automobile, two; burglary, eight; felony theft, seven; hot check and felony theft, two and hot check, one. Fourteen cases were held over until a later grand jury session. Grand jurors met on Nov. 2o (See JURY, Pnge 3) David Hill Jr. of San Antonio relating to his grandfather. Dr. W. W. Sale, the news of his hunting prize, an albino eight point buck he shot recently Jimmy Shaduek due home from Washington, D. C, for the holi- days iVIiss ChrJsline Hennlg reminding members of the CPL Employes Club of their dinner dance tonight at at Aloe Gym, with dancing to the music of Lee Kohlenberg and his or- chestra John C, Dillon home from Veteran's Hospital, Hous- ton, for the holidays but to re- turn in January Mrs. John Thiel arriving yesterday from Galveston for a visit with her mother Mrs. G. H, Taggart Ate SUn Barge of Cannon Air Force Base, Clovls, N. M., his wife and children, Sherie and Janell, here for the holidays with his parents Mrs. J. T. man reminding members of St Joseph's Mothers and Fathers Clubs of the annual Christmas party Monday st p.ml in the school cafeteria Ben T Jordan in De Tar Hospital fol lowing surgery and hoping to be home by Christmas Mrs. Francis OhsU in line to receive birthday greetings today Willie Knife marking a re cent birthday Mrs. C. W i Terry in Room 124 it De Tar (Hospital U.S. To Pull Out Of Panama Canal FLYING BULL _ Eleven head of snowbound catlle were airlifted out of. their predicament near Creede, Colo., Thursday when bulldozers were unable to reach them above the foot level. Each animal was given a tranquilizer shot before be- ing airlifted to safely. (AP Photo) MISSED BY MOST Brief Snow Flurry Noted At Local Weather Bureau You probably missed it, as most Victorians did, but it nowed early Friday morning. "It was very said a pokesman at the U.S. Weather Bureau at Foster Field, "but it was snow just the same." He said the flurry lasted just a few minutes around 1 a.m., >ut said that it was possible hat more snow fell in heavier mounts elsewhere in this area. Freezing-rain, that other, less enchanting aspect of winter veather, was recorded off and in from a.m. to 7 a.m. at he Weather Bureau as well as the rest of the area. The lowest temperature re- orded during the 24-hour period rom 1 a.m. Thursday to Friday Tiidnight was 31, at 6 a.m. The ilghest the mercury climbed during the day was nippy 40, vhich occurred shortly before p.m. Tlio weatherman forecast an- ilher freeze for Saturday morn- ng, with a low of 32 expected, ligh forecast for Saturday is 45. He also called for occasional ight rain, and a gradual warm- ip by Sunday. The freezing rain made driv. ng something of a risk for Vic- onans. The Highway Patrol in- vestigated three separate one- car accidents in a brief span of ime Friday morning when cars skidded and crashed into the -oleto Creek Bridge on the He "ugio Highway, 10 miles south of Victoria. The Highway Department atcr sanded the bridges in the area to help reduce the icy ha- zard. Nearly every section of the state was affected by-the cold wave, according to the Associ- ated Press.. Apparenty three big storms of ice and sleet converged on the heavily populated area sur- rounding Dallas and Fort Worth. One had developed in the Min- eral Wells .vicinity, another in :he area around Comanche and a third near Wichita Falls. Gradually, the big areas of precipitation expanded until the metropolitan sections were Here are Friday's tempera- tures recorded at the Weather Bureau from 1 a.m. until midnight: 1..........32 1..........35 2..........32 2.......... 37 3.......... 32 3..........39 4.......... K 4..........38 5..........32 5..........36 6..........31 6..........35 7 ..........32 7..........35 33 8......... 9..........33 9......... 10 34 10........ 11.........34 11........ noon ......34 12...... veloped, waking streets, high- ways and even sidewalks ex- tremely treacherous. Waco and Midland had sleel and freezing rain most of the afternoon and evening, storms, too, instead of diminish- ing, grew larger by the hour until most of North Texas was under a deadly coating before midnight. The ice and sleet came after a day in which snow or freez- ing rain struck in widely scat- tered points over the state anc in which temperatures rarely were above freezing. Air traffic into and out oi HAS NERVE AILMENT Little GirPs Christmas Very Likely Her Last Vorlh Texas .was virtually par ilyzed for hours, but the Weath r Bureau said the precipitation would change to rain before noon Saturday in most places Temperatures of 15 degrees and rain in the Guadalupe tlountains caused the Texa Highway Department to close U.S. 62 and U.S. 180 from Sal Flat northeastward, one of tti tate's most hazardous sections en- Traffic was stopped in El Past and in White City, N.M., and Carlsbad, N.M, In other highway districts, the situations included: Lufkin: Sleet and snow pre- dicted for Friday night with ic conditions expected on road Saturday, Yoakum: All highways now dry, but conditions could be come hazardous if there is an irecipitation. San Angela: Roads in Kimbl and Schliecher Counties expec ed to be normal Friday nigh jut ice spots remained on road around Menard and in Sutto and Crockett Counties. Road were clear late Friday in rest of Ihe district. Bryan: Icing conditions pre dieted for Saturday. Sleet fell i Those 27-degree temperatures late Fr day in some parts of the dis trict. Houston: Some icing cond ditions on bridges, overpasse and roads Friday night and Sa urday. Odessa: Icing conditions o roads all over the district. Slea and snow fell much ot Friday i 24-degree weather. Del Rio: All pavements dr and'expected to remain so un ess unforeseen weather chang, develops. The sleet and freezing rain forecasts said, would sprea over wider areas of the stat Friday night and early Satur day before changing to rain. ST. LOUIS, Mo. (AP) There will be no sleds, snow, suits or tricycles under the Christmas tree this year for Susan Marie Lictz. Unlike most children her age, Jie 3-year-old blond couldn't >egin to handle 8 tricycle. And sleds or snowsuits are out of the question because she must be protected tram any but the most moderate temperatures. Susan suffers from Nieman Pick disease, a rare malady that causes steady and, even- tually, fatal degeneration of the nervous system. The Christmas season has became a bittersweet time for 5 SHOPPING DAYS TILL CHRISTMAS Ihe John Lietz family in subur ban Berkeley. Last year presents for.two children wer< under the tree for Susan an< Kevin. But Kevin died before hi was 4, a victim of the same ail ment. "I suppose we've wound up spoiling them a little particu- with larly near the wid quietly. Last year at this could walk, although she stum bled and (ell a lot. Now she is confined to either a reclining easy chair or her bed. She rec "nizes only her parents, Mrs :tz' sister, and a baby sitter. 'She still likes to watch tele- rain Mrs. Lletz said. "She'll Sim watch anything that has chfl- day, dren in It. And she loves to lis- ten to music." Mrs. Lietz and her husband an aircraft corporation drafts- man, have received letters oi feting prayers even money front nearly every state and from Canada. "The AP story.last Christmas caused hundreds of persons t< write Mrs. Lletz saH "Some offered sympathy, others their prayers, still others stn  ver the installation at a low Today's Chuckle Perfectionist: One who takes great pains and gives them to other, people. WEATHER Mostly cloudy and rather col Saturday and Saturday nigh with occasional light rain. Par ly cloudy and warmer Sunday Variable winds, 6-14 mph. Ex pectcd temperatures Saturday Low 32, high 45. South Central Texas, Soutl east Texas: Mostly cloud through Sunday with occaslona sleet or freezing rain early Sa urday changing to occasion rain Saturday afternoon through Sunday. so cold Sun 'ay. High Saturday 35-15. Temperatures Friday: Hig 40, low 31. Tides (Port Lavaca Poi O'Connor Low at a.m. and p.m. High a p.m. and a.m. Sunda; Barometric pressure: 30.62. Sunset Saturday, sunrise Sunday. Weather extremes for th date: Low 23 In 1924, high 81 1921. Intoimition on da troin the U.S. Wcethcr Victoria The city5 came to terms Fri- ay with the general contractor, Ceeling Brothers, on the Army leserve armory being built on Ben Jordan Street. Electrical Inspector David P. misdemeanor charges in Cor- ioration Court against the con- truction superintendent and m electrician, said the superin- endent has agreen to return a qualified local electrical con- tractor to the job until Jan. H. In the meantime an examina- ion will be set up for How- ard L. Erwin, the contractor's electrician against whom a :harge was filed based on his altitude said it appeared a ma or section of the.plant was on "re. Heard Five Miles The explosion was heard fivi niles. away, while smoke could >e seen for 20 miles. John Curley, a worker, said about 150 men were working in he vicinity when a hissing noise was beard. The men ran. All traffic except emergency vehicles were kept away from southwest of Kingsville on the King Ranch. Fire equipment and ambu ances from several surrounding .owns and from the Kingsvill Naval Air Station went to the scene, but the ambulances wer only on a standby basis. Flying Inspection Airport manager R. G. Beick :r flew over the plant after h ficard an explosion. From his viewing position, i appeared the flames were bum ing about 300 feet high. The first call for fire fightln help came lo the Kingsville fin department about a.m. INDEX Abby ..........5 Ifeitiu Attrolocy 2 Editorial Rlnhs.......... 2 Gortn Church News 7 Markets Classified 11-lMJ Sports .....It Tetevisfon iswnrd ......11 ARMORY DISPUTE City, Contractor Reach Decision irown, who two days ago filed codes because the armory is i Plan Calls For Second Channel Old-Facility Inadequate .K-i.t. t t A-A WASHINGTON (AP> Presi- hatthe contractor did not have dent Johnson made a surprise failure to obtain a city electri- cal lieesnse. Brown said earlier that the contractor and Army engineers had at first arguec that the contractor did not have to comply with local building federal project. Brown said the new agree- ment was worked out Friday af ternoon with Harvey Britkreuitz the construction superintendent iper which Brown filed against Britkreuitz and Er- control of the pre win are still pending in Corpor- Canal Zonft to alion Court and there was no in- dication Friday as to what disposition of them will be made. announcement Friday that tht United States will "plan In earn- est" to replace the Panama Ca- nal with a sea-level channel linking the Atlantic and Pacific leans. Johnson Indicated also the United States might turn over control of the present Panama Panamanian jovernmet once a new canal la College Official Hails State Plan By HENRY WOLFF JR. Advocate Staff Writer President J. D. Moore of Vic- oria College said Friday he is pleased with the interest Gov. Tohn Connally expressed to- ward the junior college role in tigher education in budget recommendations for the state 'or the next biennium, "We are pleased he's ihter: ested in Moore said. "His recommendations', are almost exactly what the public junior colleges have been asking for." .Connally proposed an increase n stale aid from the present a year to "or the next year and [or the second year for aca demtc courses. These funds would be divided among the 32 lublic junior colleges based on heir actual enrollment on the 2th class day of each school ?ear. Moore pointed out funds are currently distributed colleges on the basis of the previous year's enrollment. He also noted that the pro- Deep Test Abandoned Sua Oil Co. No. 1 E. R. Urban, deep wild- cat >lx miles west of Vic- toria, has been plugged and abandoned. One ol the more Interest- ing wells drilled in the Vic- toria area this year, In- formation concerning the prospector has been kept "tile" since drilling began several months ago. One of tie deepest wells ever drilled in this area, the Urban is about IS miles northwest of Amerada No. 1 Tally, ultra-deep Wood Hi wildc it believed a failure at feet, the world's third deepest depth record. Rumor is that Amerada may attempt another deep exploration somewhere near the Tally, which produced some gas shows In the 000-foot area. CUERO MILL Process of Establishing Negotiation Date Begun Mweate Nan Strict CUERO The-first step has of the union will be here when negotiations begin. Edgar said he has received contract will begin between the a copy of the petition of decision yeen taken date when toward setting negotiations for Guadalupe Valley Cotton Mills, division of Lone Star Textiles, and certification of the union b; the NLRB from U. S. Sen Inc., and the Textile Workers Ralph Yarborough. Edgar said tent of the damage was Union of America, AFL-CIO, Employes at the Cuero mill voted 176 to 105 In favor at hav- ing the union serve as their col- lective bargaining agent in an election held .June 17. Marvin Edgar, chairman of the negotiating committee of the Cuero industrial plant, laid a letter dealing with a starting date of negotiations has been sent to Frank Kelley, general manager of Lone Star Textiles. Edgar said the letter was tent to from the union's main office in Charlotte, N. C. He said a copy of the letter has been sent to the National Labor Relations Board' regional office in Houston. The process of establishing a date when negotiationi win start got underway after the NLRB in Washington, D. C., certified the union as representative of the cotton milt employes in action taken Tuesday. Edgar said a representative pro-union employes sought Yar trough's aid in requesting the NLRB to make a decision (See MILL, Page S) increase of for he first year does not seem as ligh as it does at first glance f enrollment gains are taken into consideration. He estimated that the'actual nerease would be more like million considering the enroll- ment factor. This estimate is }ased on an increase of 10 per cent in enrollment during the year's involved. "This is still a good Moore said. The local administrator said :he proposed system of divid- ing funds by actual enrollment will be fairer than the melhod now used. If the governor's proposals are accepted, the academic [unds will; be restricted to use [or salaries and supplies, as :hey now are. However, pres- ent state funds received by Vic- toria College do not meet all salary demands, and thei none left for supplies, Moore said.: "What we would hope to do with the additional money is enrich our instructional salar- ies he said. He also pointed out that with a better state appropriation to fake care of salaries, the junior college district would have more of their own funds available to (See OFFICIAL, Page 3) in operation. The President went before elevision cameras in the White House theater to read his policy- setting statement that cwrie 11 months and nine days after the outbreak of Panama violence in which 20 weic killed and MO :njured. New Treaty Johnson, noting that last Jan. jary's violence was triggered by disputes over the Canal Zone treaty with Panama, announced the United States wants to nego- tiate "an entirely new treaty on the existing Panama Canal." Any new agreement, he said, should terminate automatically "when a sea-level canal comes into operation." That presuma- bly would mean termination of American control over the Ca- nal Zone. Johnson said there seem to be four possible routes for a new canal two in Panama, one in Colombia and one through Ni- caragua and perhaps, a corner of Costa Rica. Costs Estimated Johnson gave no cost esti- Minor Fire Hils Carbide Plant males .-but experts estimated earlier this year that the price tag for a sea-level channel would range from million for one of the Panama routes to M.9 billion for the one through Nicaragua, providing nuclear explosives can be used for dig- ging. Conventimnal explosives would be more costly. Johnson gave no hint of when such a new canal might be com- pleted but experts estimated Panama Canal will be hopeless- ly jammed by 1980 Channel Too Small Johnson said, "Already mori than 300 ships built or building are too big lo go through with full loads." Initial Panamanian reaction to the President's anounce- ment was favorable. Humberto Caiamari, one of Panama's rep- resentatives in post-rioting ne- Totiations with the United [tales, said of the proposal tor a new treaty, "This is exactly what we had been hoping for." Calamari predicted Johnson's proposal would lead to im- proved relations between the two countries. American government offi- cials said disposition, of the physical assets of the Panama Canal, once a replacement was In opera lion, would present a real problem. They said Ameri- in the old canal, Seadrift plant Friday resulted in a minor fire which was quick- ly brought under control, ac- cording to John H. Hill, assist- ant plant manager. The rupture occurred at ap- proximately p.m. The af- fected unit was shut down safe- ly with no injury to personnel. Cause of the explosion had not been determined. Full ex- Advocate News Service PORT Rupture of can Interest _ .._ ____, a bulk bin at Union Carbide's dating back to 1903, would then ''be reduced to a negligible Johnson's two-part announce- ment was regarded as a pack- age proposal, wilb negotiation of a new Panama Canal treaty (See CHANNEL, Page I) known Friday nigJit but appear- ed to be such that the unit will be returned to service within a few days. SUNDAY PREVIEW Yule Displays Listed Uw II nfraati ia fee aunal Victoria area Cariftmai Ugkttag Coiteit win appear in Stnday'i Advocate for the eearnu'emce W time dniriag to make a tour tae displays, College Standards K'i beccwimg mere difficttt for high Khool to college, beeaate eeHegei are Ikeir itaadards eatraaee exam. The fin ttery win be foud Sudaj'g Ten Write For Youth A Vktoria pastor and his wife have been Kilning wide recogaitioa for a series booklets they have writlem for TMth group. The story their win appear ia Sf adajr's Fa Mafaitoe, V Vour children will beauUful ChrlsUnai Record and read-along booklet lor many ye are. 12 Christmas favorites to fill your home with mafic of holiday music. AN IDEAL LAST sirrm At our 111 E. KlHrnMired m TKTHU uvmn   

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