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Advocate Newspaper Archive: December 9, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - December 9, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 216 TCUPHONI HI I-MM VICTORIA, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 9, 1964 16 Cents CRASH AFTERMATH This car occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Stokes of 2108 E. Sabine St. struck a utility pole and partly crashed through a hurricane fence after colliding with another car Tuesday night in the 3700 Main Street. The leased after being Hospital for head vocate Photo) block of North couple was re- treated at DeTar lacerations. (Ad- Death of Cowboy kt Inez Cause of death of a 67-year-old Inez vho fell from a horse while he was working cattle cing investigated Tuesday The victim, Charlie Montag, was pronounced n arrival at a local hospital Tuesday afternoon eing taken by private vehicle from the Carl t" Citation a mue anu a nun ease 01 nez. Justice of the Peace C. said he would return a Hity Postal in the death Wednesday as soon as he learns more about the' circumstances lead-ng ta.. Montag 's death. Heart Attack Eyed said there was a possi- A Presidential Citation that Montag suffered a ficate wiUssbe presented before he fell from icloria .postal employes in horse or that he died from monies at p. m.Friday head injury suffered in the le main workroom floor of ost office, Postmaster Paul (crlhelot said for Ihe past eight to en years had been an em- The citation, one of 17 being warded to certain post offices i Texas and Louisiana, will be resented by J. Allen of Willard Holzheuser who was working cattle along with Hontag, Chuck and J. M. and Emil Horelka. f Dallas, assistant to the re-ional director of Ihe Post said Horelka saw i Ion lag "freeze" in Ihe saddle. ce Department. The certificate is signed by "resident Johnson and Post-naster General Gronouski. An increase in mail said Montag apparently spurred his horse causing the animal to throw him off. One of his boots was caught in the uring the past nine aceount-ng periods (roughly nine nonths) while at (he same Rushed to Hospital Holzheuser said Monlag was ecreasing the mail handling ork hours, is the basis for about 300 or 400 feel away from the other horsemen rounding up a herd oi "i- Berthelot pointed out lis year is the 10th said Holzheuser and ary of the government-wide in-enlive awards program. Fimbel rushed Monlag to the hospital after artificial res- rogram is aimed to a more fficicnl economical at the scene failed. The site where Montag fell was nd to a greater employe Arenosa Creek in Jack- ipation in reducing costs County. fficient and courteous arrangements for ce to the who was born in The Yoakum Post Office County, were incom- Iso named as one of Ihe COWBOY, Page 9) osl offices to receive the spp-ifll and Cold Today's to Continue A moderate is a cloudy, cold weath- who holds the same view with occasional light rain, is do, regardless of what il for Ihe Victoria area Thursday, the Wealher indicated Tuesday night j Victoria County Airport. d a m disagreeable f- 1, extended from Browns- up to College Station, and expected to spread northeast Billy Bayer and Kenneth eastward Wednesday. Pre- er having a leisurely lunch of arbecue the Don S. up until 10 p.m. Tuesday measured .22 inches, for a oing the same but in a of 31.73 inches this year. lurry Bruno Leila rain was the first measure- o cheer Ihe rain clouds on precipitation since Nov. ..Mrs. John Keerao birthday yesterday Miss Mtphie Leibold home from the ospltal Merle Byars laying a sense of humor ant to customer all in ne and wilh occasional light rain throughThursday with Shier enjoying an evening winds 5, to 15 ut in search of Mexican Expected Wednesday Jesse Angerslein, and Low 45 high 52. 3ary, sharing fl recent catch 01 rout with friends Central Texas: Mostly cloudy Wednesday and Thurs- Christian doing a good deed wilh occasional lighl rain insisting a lady out of a park ng place W. R. .a few showers, Hig] Wednesday 48-56. haring his Royal Highness Tuesday: High s wilh friends .A. W. low 43. r Jr. and Doris (Port Lavsca For ;elling some credit along Lows at unior and Senior Luther and1 a.m. Thursday; fuers for iheir annual art at p.m. and p.m. low at the !ngUsh Lutheran Church Mrs. James M. Wyilt Wednesday, sunrise Thursday. :elebrale a birthday extremes for this Solid Approval Both Bond Proposals Court Ban Asked On Railroad Strike Nationwide Walkout Called Dec. 15 by 8 Shop Unions Voters OK City Hall, Street Plans CHICAGO (AP) Three shop unions Tuesday called a nation- wide railroad strike for Dec. 15. The carriers petitioned for a federal court injunction to block the walkout. The unions, representing Couple Hurt hi Crash on Main Street A Victoria couple was injured 'uesday night in a two-car col- sion in the 3700 block of North lain Street. Jerry Stokes, 22, and his wife, lary Sue, 17, of 2108 E. Sabine t. received emergency treat- ment for head lacerations at 3e Tar Hospital where they verc taken by McCabe-Carruth mbulance. The Stokes are ex- Jecting their second child this man in. The Hit Pole, Fence Stokes' 1965 sedan about machinists, elec- trical workers and sheet metal workers, reinstated a strike call over a wage dispute originally set for Nov. 23 but postponed. They reset the strike after nego- tiations with the carriers reached a stalemate in Wash- ington Monday. Petition Filed The railroad's filed a petition in U.S. District Court' charging that the strike call is an illegal attempt to compel the railroads o bargain directly with the three unions rather than with he AFL-C10 Railway Employes Department, which had been authorized to bargain for them. The carriers, seeking a tem- rorary restraining order and a lermanent injunction against a strike, charged a nationwide work stoppage would cost them a daily loss in operating reve- nues of Judge Joseph Sam Perry set a hearing on the petition for Wednesday. Christmas Rush If a walkout is called and olh er railroad unions decline to pass through picket lines, more ihan Ihe nation's rail traffic could.be tied up at a time when" are mak- ing Christmas travel plans the pattern with Ihe three shop unions, The unions .contend their members possess certain skills entitling them to a larger boost, 'hoy contend they are under- >aid in relation to comparable obs in industry. The three shop unions sent notices to Wirlz, the National Mediation Board, and J. E. Volfe, chief negotiator for the -amors, and to their members (See STRIKE, Page'9) Mrs. D. E. Mullcnix of 3710 N. dain St., just minutes before board. he accident happened. The Not Injured impact points were the rent of the Wright car against general vice he right rear of the Stokes' vehicle, Eikenberg said. Both cars landed close (o each other on the shoulder of the south- bound lane with Stokes' itriking the utility pole ence. The accident occurred during i light rain shortly before car and mashed partly; against a util- ty pole and partly through' a urricane fence located on the west side of the highway'after i collided with another ear in le southbound lane, police said. City Patrolman W, D. Eiken- shipment of Christmas parcels berg said they had backed out isjat a peak, if a driveway at the home of The unions are demanding a >irs. Mr! "and wage hike larger than that rec- ommended by a presidentia' When, the railroads earlier announced plans to go into fed- eral court, Joseph W. Ramsey International president of Association the Machinists, said, "the unions are ready to contest such a love." Six Unions Involved Six shop unions were involvec in the Nov. 23 strike call, bul the three that represent boiler- makers and blacksmiths, car men and firemen and oilers reached agreements before the deadline. The agreements fol lowed closely the recommenda lions of a presidential emergen cy board for a 27-cent hourly wage boost spread over three years. The three unions still seeking when a B58 Hustler a settlement postponed the Nov with a nuclear device 23 strike call at the request o n the bomb bay, caught fire Secretary of Labor W. Willan Wirlz. The railroads have settle onally all Ihose who gave icir II m e and money to, pro- ,ole Ihe bond program." Solid Support Both propositions carriedln 11 11 voting boxes, with a to al persons turning out to ote. Proposition No. 2, calling for in street improvem en passed by the wides Baker, Pal Linked in Bank Deal WASHINGTON (AP) Sen- ate investigators traced a shad-! owy link Tuesday between Bob- by Baker long-time pal's successful efforts to help a Cali- brnia bank obtain a national charter in 1962. But Wayne L. Bromley a ellow Senate page with Baker margin, lo cily __j all issue was ap- rovcd lo 733.' City Council.will meet in spe ial session at a.m Wednesday to canvass the re urns and make an official re- port. At Ihe same time counci up, the matter of find ng temporary rqtiarters for cily all personnel and records. Temporary Sites er at the base, said there was no fies of the 27-cent wage in- danger of nuclear explosion or crease pattern recommended by the presidential board. The car- riers have refused to go beyond Palmetto Water Project Given Qualified Approval Jingle Urban In Methodist Hospital in Houston and wife EMoren, there with him Ivy EUik marking a 14lh birthday. Advocate News Service Palmetto Bend, Waler Project of the U.S. Bu- reau of Reclamation in the Jack- son County Flood Control Dis- trict Is feasible, the Texas Wa- ler Commission declared Tues- day, but it put some strings on its approval. Bul, it warned, it would be better to construct Stage 1, the dam across the Navidad, rath- er than the. full project, which l_y includes a dam also across the Lavaca River. Further, the commission de- clared, sale of water from the project will not, even finance Stage 1, so: .will be re- quired on local property in the supporting district to make the payments for the local share of the cost. In, its formal comments'on the project, submitted at a hear- big Sept. 14, the commission suggested that congress autho- rize cons I ruction of the Stage 1 project, to cost of which County dis- date: Uw 22 m-1917, high be required'to pay lo obtnin the water it provide a method for automatic de-aulhorization within five years if local interests fail to approve a cosl allocation con- trad, at an election held under Texas laws. The comment now goes lo the Secretary of the Interior to be- come a part of the report on the project which will go to congress. The commission made no rec- ommendation for congressional action on Stage 2, since the wa- ter needs study which accom- panies the Bureau of Reclama- tion study Indicated lhat it would not be needed for about 19 years. Al the hearing, Commissioner Otho Dent expressed doubt as io the wisdom of giving state approval to that phase of the project wilh its need so far away. in 1939. This tram the U.S Victoria OHIO. authorization it should and later fellow law students together refused lo answer questions about a check "rom Ihe. Redwood National 3ank of San Rafael that bore their endorsements. He :ook'lhe Fifth Amendment on :haT and' other .41 limes in all. ICashfd Check An Investigator for the Senate Rules Committee, Samuel Scott, testified that Bromley told him in an interview last Nov. 19 that he had Baker cash the check Decause "he didn't want bis wife to know about the money, particularly how he spent Scott quoted Bromley as say- ing he paid on a bill he had ran up at the Carroll Arms, a hotel with a restaurant and bar near the Senate Office Building. "He said he wasted some ol the rest of the money and usec what was left to buy furnishings for a new house he had Scolt lold the committee. Got None He said Bromley told him Baker got none of the money. Scott said no attempt hac been made to check whether Bromley had paid the to the Carroll Arms. Committee counsel Lennox P. McLendon told him to do so as soon as he finished testifying. The committee spotlighted th_ bank charter following las; week's inquiry Into Baker's role in an alleged politica payoff. The bank has said the was a "perfectly normal' attorney's fee. During the afternoon, the committee heard a denunciation of Don B. Reynolds, chief accu ser of former Ambassador Mat thew B. McCloskey. Testimony' Giltis of Philadelphia attorney for McCloskey, sait Reynolds has given false testi mony before other govemmen agencies. Without giving details jittis said Reynolds' military rile "shows clearly what kind o person he is." Reynolds, a Silver Spring VId., insurance man, has testi :ied he was the "bag man" for McCloskey and Baker in the purported payoff to Ihe 196C Democratic presidential cam oaign fund, McCloskey ha, sworn there is no truth in the payoff allegation. Gittis made his attack (See BAKER, Page 9} INDEX J rnuxw ........j 5 A number of possible temper .ry sites have been studied, bu Architect Chris DiStefano ha old council that some three months will be required to de- working plans for In jew city hall. A decision on where to move may not be mad mmediatfily. The bonds will provide a city all structure of two storie lore than doubling p r e s e n pace, an adjoining police head Barters providing some quare feel of floor space ir asement nnd first floor levels ind a Corporation Cour wing adjoining the police heat juarters on the north. Sets Pace Shields School, Box 8, wa he first precinct to report af er poll closed at 7 p.m. an ts figures set the pace for wha was to come. At Shields th approved the city ha proposition by 196 to 64, an he paving by 199 to 61, se ing up the belter than 2-1 ratio Victoria High School, Box 10 was the closest, the city ha passing by a margin 85-5 and the paving by 108-31. Results of other voting pre cincts can be found in the ad iaccnt box. Vote by Precincts Voting ,Place 1. Hopkini School 2, Courthouse 3. St. Joseph School 4. Potti Welder School 5, Juan Linn School 6. Cram School 7. O'Ccnnor School 8. Shields School 9. Stanly School 10. Victoria High 30. Our Saviour's Luth TOTALS City Hall For Against 98 142 161 139 127 259 156 196 J52 85 105 1620 29 42 41 85 64 73 _54 63 733 Paving DrainooV For 176 144 126 289 T99 176 108 _m T735 48 38 65 86 92 77 "4 31 54 626 Johnson, Wilson Plan Future Talks WASHINGTON (AP) President- Johnson and British Prime Minister Harold Wilson wound.up two days of conferences on. ways to bring about a satisfac- tory reshuffling of the Western world's nuclear de- 'enses by reporting Tuesday night that new discussions are necessary. A high White House official told newsmen Johnson HE Total 2 PerGsnt Shy of Goal Less Ihan two per cent of Ihe United Fund quota re- mained to be raised Tuesday afternoon, reported Ken Nath- an, campaign chairman. "We again urge anyone who has'not made a gift to do Nathan said. "One small gift could be the one that will pul United Fund over its goal for the first time in three years. "Anyone who would like to make a donation can come by the office at 110 South Main or call HI 5-0236. We will gladly send someone out to pick up the pledge Wednesday The final report meeting of al divisions will be Wednesday noon at the Continental Inn. 'We certainly hope an an nouncement can be made at that limp that we reached the the campaign official said. Though Ihe campaign ends Wednesday, some late contribu- tions are expected to come in throughout the week, and Unit- ed Fund personnel and volun teevs will remain on the job do- last minute campaign tasks. will give Wilson's proposals careful consideration. snld here is no change in the Pnt- dent's, thinking, jabout the iirv- xjrlance and feasibility of the U.S.- plan for a, seagoing fleet jointly owned, .operated and manned by countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organ- ization. i Initial Exchange Johnson and Ihe prime minis- ter, in a joint communique sum- ming up Iheir sessions in gener- al terms, called it an initial ex- change of views. They said this was "a preliminary to further discussions among interested members of the Alliance." The Iwo leaders said they agreed that Ihe objeclive with respeet'lo nuclear defense is "lo cooperate in finding the ar- rangements which best meet the legitimate interests of all mem- bers of the Atlantic Alliance, while maintaining existing safe- guards on the use of nuclear weapons, and preventing their further proliferation." No Decisions Analyzing with newsmen Die communique, the While House official stressed thai the two Siamese Twin Girls Born To Bay City Woman, 35 HOUSTON (AP) Siamese .win girls, joined at the breast- were born Tuesday to a 3ay City mother. The infants were brought lo Texas Children's Hospital at the Texas Medical center in Hous- ton for "X-rays and study pur- poses." The Bay Cily ambulance bear- ing Ihe children and Iheir doctor uas involved in a two-car colli- sion en route to the hospital. The twins and Ihe doctor were not injured. The mother of the twins Is Mrs. Ann Webber, about 35. The father, John Webber, is a postal employe. They have three other children, Kelly, 6, Linda, 4, Bridgette, 3. Dr. H. C. Mallhcs, Bay City, Bids Scheduled On Road Work Bids are scheduled lo be opened by the Oalveston Dis- trict, U.S. Army Corps of En ginecrs, at 2 p.m. Dec. 29, fo construction of an access roac along the west protection levee of the Victoria Barge Cana from the Missouri Pacific tracks near Bloomington approximate- ly miles north to the new canal bridge. The road will hav a 20-foot roadway with four-foo .shoulders. It will be a. part o 1J SHOPPING DAYS It TILL CHRISTMAS road planned along the entire length of canal. was one of the physicians who delivered the twins by Caesar- ian section at a.m. at the Matagorda General Hospital in Bay City. "They were full-term he said. Malthcs was assisted by his nephew, Dn Fred Malthes, also of Bay Cily. A .spokesman at Texas Chil- dren's Hospital said the twins were in good condition although joined from below the neck lo slightly below their navels. Tests were under way lo deter- mine if there are any common vital organs. The spokesman said Tuesday night "after four hours in the heart catherizalion laboratory, it appears that Ibe Webber; twins have separate hearts. "They are not In imme- diate danger at, present, and separation will not be attempted for several days, during which; time a thorough investigation of Other systems will be carried out." A pediatrics expert at the medical center said the inci- dence of such Siamese t.vins is one In about births. He described Ihe Iwins as meaning they de vcloped from one egg. that no decisions would be reached at Iheir conferences Ihe first since Johnson's election and since Wilson's Labor party came lo power. The la Iks brought a careful probing by each for the other side's views on a number of in- ternational issues, the House source said. The next slop will be lo con- sult wilh the Allies to find out what Ihey think about proposals on the NATO nuclear issue. Such consultations will begin next week in London, when West German Foreign Minister Gerhard Schroeder will visit with Patrick Gordon Walker, the British foreign secretary. The source indicated that such consultations also may take place with countries which have shown no interest thus far in the American fleet project. Whether France, a country openly hostile to Ihe American idea, will be one of these coun- tries remained an open ques- tion; but the general feeling aft- er the Johnson-Wilson talks was (See TALKS, Pige BEGINS TODAY! HOUSEWIVES CHRISTMAS SPECIAL hi IA words A dayi JJQ 1m nl HI 5-1451 SM Hit Claitiftwi   

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