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Advocate: Monday, December 7, 1964 - Page 1

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - December 7, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 214 TELETHON! VICTORIA- TEXAS, MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1964 14 Cents Resignation Of Burch 6EssentiaP Roiniiey Sees Step Needed DENVER, Colo., Michigan Gov. George Romney said Sunday tie felt that the re- moval or resignation of Dean Burch 'as Republican national chairman "is essential." Romney had been asked whether he (nought Burch will resign. "It is loo early to say. .but after waiting for some time lo see if there was any indication of a program of undertaking lo unify and strengthen the party on his part, I feel that his re- moval or his resignation is es- sential." Burch has called a Jan, 22-23 meeting of the National Com- mittee in Chicago at which he said he will ask a vole of confi- dence and will resign if does not have majority support. Majority Against Romney. said Sunday he be- lieves a majority in the National Commitlee are for the replace- ment of Burch. Gov, Robert E. Smylie of Ida- ho said he presumed that after the criticisms voiced here by unanimous vote of 18 GOP gov- ernors and governors-elect that Burch will decide whether he can "wear the shoe with com- fort" In further direction of tile party. Gov. Tim Babcbck of Mon- tana, a supporter of defeated presidential candidate Barry Goldwaler, said he feels lhal Burch should be given the op- Congo Rebels Win Backing of Russia Joseph Redmon Honored As Top Catholic Layman portunity meetings to demonstrate with GOP National ip- in Committee members that he can work to unite the party again. If he doesn't, Babcock said, Burch should resign. Pitch For Unity This pitch for unity was the central theme of a two-day meeting with a that ended Saturday unanimous statement proposing expansion of the Re- publican leadership mechan- isms to include all elements of the party. The'statement issued by the governors did not call for the ouster of Burch, as Smylie had proposed in calling the extraor- dinary meeting at which he served as chairman. There was controversy among the GOP governors whether the statement they issued implied that they favored Burch's ousl- er. Clear Implication Govs. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York, William W. Scran- ton of Pennsylvania and Rom- ney said this was Ihe clear, im- plication of the statement. The governors' declaration put them on record as opposing "all forms of political radical ism, whether lo the right or to Ihe left." Homncy said on a telcvisior program CBS, "Face the Na tion" lhal he expecle< Burch to approve the statemen of principles which the gover nors had issued. But the Miehi gan governor said this will no be enough. To Decide It will be up to members o the GOP National Committee meeting Jan. 22-23 in Chicago Romney said, to decide whether Burch really supports the gov ernors' position or not. TOP CATHOLIC AWARD Joseph T. Redmon, left, is shown with the plaque presented to him Sunday night after he had been announced as Vic- toria's Outstanding Catholic Lay- man. The Rev- Clement Otting, chap- lain of the Knights of which sponsors the annual award, made the presentation. Joseph T. Redmon, .a Victoria resident for seven years, was recognized Sunday night as the Outstanding Catholic Layman of Victoria at the Annual Awards Banquet sponsored by he Knights of Columbus. Two hundred persons at the dinner in the basement of St. Vlary's Hall saw the award, a landsome plaque, presented by :he Rev. Clement Otting, chap- lain of the local Knights of Co- lumbus Council and spiritual advisor at St. Joseph High School. Father Otting introduced Red- mon's mother, Mrs. Anne Red- mon of Louisville, Ky., as the person most responsible for his Catholic action and Christian virtues. He also presented mem- bers of the Redmon family, Sedmon's wife Bernice and four of their six children. Redmon, currently faithful comptroller of the Fourth De- gree Assembly of the Knights of Columbus, is past deputy and grand knight and a trustee in his second term. church is depending now more; than ever on the layman to take Christ and Christian principles o all parts of the temporal world. Through recent innova- ions, the church is not asking you lo serve God more but bet- ;r." Fourteen local Catholic or- ganizations selected nominees or the Outstanding Catholic Layman Award and upon being named to the honor, .Redmon gave credit to the warm friend- ship that he has found among all Victoria people in the short time that he has lived in the ity. The gray haired Redmon re; ceived his degree -from the Jefferson Law School in Ken- lucky in 1940, was employed by Du Pont that year and transfer- this annual award named in honor of Ihe late Father Leo pold of Inez. Among those pay- ing him tribute Sunday were the three previous winners, V. T Kalliis, Frank Fossali and Al- bert Harrison. Principal speaker for the oc- casion was Dr. Joseph Murphy of LaMarque, state secretary of the Knights of Columbus, who stressed the importance of the new role that the layman is playing in the activities of Cath- olic Church. "This is the beginning of a new era for the Catholic lay- Dr. Murphy said. "The INDEX Astrology Classified ......IM The Michigan governor Editorial Goren Movi Cornices Sporu .........10-1 Television......... Women's red to Victoria in 1957. At the present time, he is a conlrol superintendent. M. V. (Sandy) Sa'ndlioferl faithful navigator of the Fourth Degree, Knights of Columbus. was the toastmaster. Isidore Ozuna of the Catholic War 'Veterans led in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rt. Rev Msgr. F. .0. Beck gave the in vocation, and Albert Harrison chairman of the Banquet Com mittee, gave the welcoming ad dress.. Ray Kalich, grand knight o the Knights of Columbus, in troduced the clergy and invited guests, and the Rev. Eustace A; Hermes, pastor of Our, Lady of Victory Church .of .whlci Redmon. is a charter member gave the benediction. Mississippi Action Still Jndecided Heaving Set For Thursday PHILADELPHIA, Miss. (AP) Mississippi officials said Sun- :y they have not decided what ale action will be taken alnst 21 men the FBI has ar- sted in connection with the urder of three civil rights orkers last summer. W.H. Johnson Jr., district at- rney for this red clay hill dls- ict of eastern Mississippi, said s had talked with federal au- oritjes about Ihe case "but 1 m't say at this lime just whal ction the state' will take." "They have orally given us eir Johnson said, nit they have not given us any ritlen reports." Awaiting Hearing The FBI has assured him that will provide full informatioi i the case, Johnson said. The 21 men, including Nesho a County Sheriff Lawrence Ra ey and his deputy, Cecil Price ere arrested Friday. Nineteen f them were charged with vio ating Ihe i civil rights of the "ain men, and the other two 'ere charged as accessories. They are awaiting a hearing hursday. A government source sai( HELD IN CUERO Farm Bureau President Rakes Material Worship' PHILADELPHIA (AP) A He is the fourth recipient of national farm leader called Sun- ilay on all Americans includ- lie thinks a majority of members of the natioal com- ,i 7? (S mittec now favor the removal of UIXOj Jljfr iji-iJ Burch. This did not jibe' ever, with information provided; to some of Ihe governors byj nonparlisan sources. This indi- cated that the national chair- man at Ihis point commands a' majority lo retain his post. "I rather expect Mr. Burch to indicate he agrees with the prln-' ciples we have set Rom- ney said. But the Michigan gov- ing his farmers to stop "trying to get mine while the getting is good." Charles B. Shuman, Illinois farmer and president of the American Farm Bureau Feder- ation, said in an interview he is greatly concerned by an "alarming trend toward the worship of political and materi- al power." Shuman was expected to press this theme at the 46th an- nual convention of his big Farm organization opening Monday. Delegates began arriving Sun- day from each of the states. Shuman would have farmers as well as others depend more on their own efforts and less on the government. The convention will decide what policies it will pursue in the year ahead on plans of the Spending Spree Comes To Halt for Secretary (See GOP, Page J-l) Red Unit Routed By Vietnamese CA MAU, South Viet Nam (AP) South Vietnamese in- fantrymen, supported by light bombers and rocket-spurting U. S. helicopters, routed a Commu- nrst Viet Cong battalion dug in at Tan. Lac village, seven miles north of here Saturday. Alter one' of the fiercest bat- tles of Uie.war, 115 Communist troops lay dead on a rice paddy battlefield. Six U. S. airmen were .wound- ed and 14 helicopters were dam- aged by gronndfire. Govern- ment casualties after the nine- hour fight were announced as 86, but the victory was regarded as a morale booster for the South Vietnamese. MIDLAND voluptu- ous 32-year-old red-haired sec- retary was in a dismal Midland County jail cell Sunday after: six weeks of extravagant living. Sheriff's investigators charged that Germaine Springer fi- nanced her spree of new cars, furs and jewels by forging some in checks on her oilman employer. Sheriff's Deputy Gene Howell filed a complaint specifically charging tho woman with forg- ing a check with the name of independent oil opera- tor ;H. C. Hood. Howell said U checks involv- ing are Involved. "She was a dam good secre Hood said. His bank had assumed any loss he might suf- The forgeries were uncovered last week in a routine check by Hood's accountants. The ac- countants, turned up checks for a automobile, for a when she learned tlie account- fur stole, for a watch anc to an Illinois savings and loan firm to pay off a debt. Miss Springer skipped town reau Johnson administration In farm aid programs. The farm bureau long ha sought a gradual withdrawal o [overnment from agriculture. The landslide viclory of Prcs dent Johnson at the Novembe election was being weighed b he convention's platform drafi ers, but there was little likel lood Uie farm bureau will eas up on its opposition to stron lovernmcnt farm programs. The organization has oppose most of the present measure ivhen they were before Con ress. Shuman, who looked the par of a business executive o irofessional man, said the re iponsibility for what he callet he trend of Americans to try t get something for nothing res! lot so much on politicians as o he people themselves. He sai .he politicians merely seek t give the voters what they wan The farm bureau leader ha jeen. saying, In recent slat< ments, that this country ncec to awaken to what he callc moral and spiritual. He recent wrote that some "Iremendoi financial or military crise "Might come along to cans Americans to revise their va ues. Or, he said, it might be nc leadership that develops I bring proper inspiration. Monday's opening session wi feature Shuman's annual ai dress to the delegates and h recommendations for farm b ,___ ant was checking Hood's bank' E" account, police said. Hnwell and Texas Rangers arrested her on a Fort Worth street over the weekend. They recovered 18 bills, the fur stole and the car. "She did this after all of us had tried to befriend Hood _..... said. She was sent to him by 2311 E. Ariaqua, accidental an employment agency In Octo- shot himself in the left leg Su ber and asked a monthly day morning at his home whl salary as his personal secre- handling a small .25 calibe lary. automatic pistol. "I didn't have enough work Arnold told police that h to justify that kind of pay, but I (old her I would start her at DeTar Hospital where he w a month and if things treated for the flesh wound by worked out after a couple of months, I -would give her a raise. She just said 'that'll be left leg slightly above the kn er pistol, about p.m. Sat- urday in a dance hall al Hoch- eim. Calletano Cisneros Jr. was be- ng held in DeWitt County Jail n Cuero Sunday in connection with Garcia's death. Deputy Sheriff Willrad Worthington said no bond had been set Sunday. The shooting occurred at Mar- inez Dance Hall off Stale High vay 111. The hall is locatec about 17 miles from Cuero. According to a preliminary nvesligation conducted Sunday here was no argument or figh prior lo the shooting. unday that the FBI has eyewit esses "and that obviously the yewit nesses were partici He said that no mor irrests were imminent in the ase. Defense Fund "We have a strong case, aid. The source added that the ar ests could not have been madi arlier than Friday because al he evidence needed had no wen obtained until shortly be- ore the complaints were filed. Meanwhile, a Mississippi-wid efense fund is being organizes o pay legal fees for 21 men. Laurel G. Wier of Philadel ihia, one of the eight attorney vho represented 18 of the me ,t their arraignment Friday ir .leridian, said Sunday that orporation probably will be ormed to accept the defens money and administer it. Guarding Case "Some of these boys can stir ise he said. "Some of then are pretty poor." FBI agents were guardin heir case and refused to tal ibont details of their investiga ion except to say that 15 agents had interviewed mor ban Mississippi residents ncluding 460 members of th Cu KIux Klan, an anti-Negr errorist organization. The FBI said five of the me (See ACTION, Page 14) Youth, 17, Faces Giving Aid Murder Charge Soviet OK's Worthington said Cisneros md been back in Cuero about ;wo weeks before the shooting. Worthington said Clsneros had been working in Wisconsin. Garcia's body -was taken to Victoria Sunday for an autopsy. Worthinglon said the report on autopsy had not been made later in the ,day, Funeral services for Garcia will be held at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Gonzales at p.m. Monday. The Rev. August Otto will officiate. Burial St. James Catholic August Ott will be in Cemetery. was born in Gonzales Feb. K, 1941, son of Mr. and For Airlift Secret Session Seals Terms CAIRO (AP) The Soviet nion has agreed to lieip fi- ance and supply the arms air- 't tunneling guns to Congolese ebels, an Iron Curtain diplomat aid Sunday. The diplomat, who cannot be irthcr identified, said the So- et agreement to furnish arms as given last weekend during secret meeting here of Soviet mhassador Vladimir Erofeev nd Congolese rebel "defense ijnister" Gaston Soumlalot. The diplomat said that on that Mrs. Joe Garcia. He was mar- ried to Amalia Camarillo Feb 24, 1962. Surviving are the wife; the parents; a daughter, Diana Garcia; five brothers and seven sisters. 4 Persons Hurt In 2 Collisions Four persons were hurt in two automobile collisions, one of hem a head-on accident, with- in less than ati hour's time Sunday evening. Admitted to Citizens Memor- ial Hospttal. for injuries re- ceived in the head-on collision', in Italian President Steps Down ROME (AP) Antonio Segni, one of Italy's great postwar leaders, resigned Sunday night as president four months after a brain stroke left him partly par- alyzed and badly impaired his speech. Senate President Cesare Mer- zagora, acting chief of state, ordered a joint session of Par- liament lo convene Dec. 16 to elect a new preeident for a full seven-year term. Under the con- slitulion, Parliament must be convened within IS days to name a successor to the largely ceremonial office. In a statement to the nation accompanying his resignation, the silver-haired Sengi, 73, said his decision was "dictated by the sense of duty toward the slate, toward the so beloved homeland, toward you." Al- (See ITALIAN, Page 14) which occurred at p.m. a 2202 Bloomington Highway fere: Bobbie Gene Hoffman, 30, [XiPont of 501 Perth Road. He received a deep cu on the bridge of his nose an other injuries. Shirley Kellis, 21, of 4005 N Navarro, who suffered cul and .who was a passenger Hoffman's car. Johnny Todd, 16, of 1006 S East St., who received a hea laceration. Todd was a passenger in car driven by Franklin Tod< 19. Neither Franklin Todd, no another pasenger, Billy Ra Todd, 13, were injured. Patrolman William N. Pralk said the Todd vehicle collision with the car driven b Hoffman. Damage was est mated at to each vehicle. In the other accident, Bonn Moody, a passenger in a ca driven by Harris Moody, o Clute, Tex., was treated for head cut at DeTar Hospital an dismissed. She was injured at p.m when the Moody vehicle was collision with a sedan driven b Robert McKinney, 18, of 230 Walnut. Today's Chuckle You can take (he 
                            

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