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Advocate Newspaper Archive: November 15, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - November 15, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 15 119th 192 TELEPHONE HI S-14S1 VICTORIA, TEXAS, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1964 Kitabllshcd HIS '14 Pages Huge Drifts Lyndon, Aides Map Plan Israelis, TT-V -M. Piled by To Build 'Great Society Oilier Arras Dry As Kvcr JOHNSON CITY, Tex. President Johnson and two Cahincl members talked Satur- day of getting health care and bigger .Social Security checks Secretary of Welfare Anthony! In midaflernoon J. Celebrozze predicted passage td wlial is called of some sort ot hospital insur- ance program for the elderly patterned after the administra- lie motored! the Scharn- horsl section of his ranchlands; about 14 miles to the northeast to look at white-tailed deer on Hi 'Mil: nil SS A major snowstorm piled up young. huge drifts in sections of Wyo- Secretary of Labor W. Willard mine; and Colorado Salurclav, for the elderly and bill to tie it into Social Sc- this first day of the hunling sea-: ''Operation Birthright" lor the curily system. [son. But he wasn't hunting at! Syrians Clash in Air Kadi Claims Olhcr Villain ._................................ pictured the next 60 in the nature of a flat S7 lull in many areas the long- "f financial and legislative plan- monthly increase in Social Secu- parclicd earth received no mnis-'niiig by the administration as rily benefits approved by (he 'providing "an extraordinary Senate this year, as part of a one-package bill including [son. But he wasn't hunting at! DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) Cclebrezze also predicted tliC'that point nnd the season lasts Syrian and Israeli jets battled' administration will seek some-Junta Dec. 31. Saturday north of the Sea of magm- lure. Travel as opportunity for really heavy -.now and poor visibility fifi'iit breakthrough." health care. fofce'd the closint; of C S. t'i He described Operation Bir- Wirtz and Celebrezze met cans. nvcr the Hii> Horn .Mountains Ihriglil as no efioii to keep col-with the President al his ranch. Both ma imiversily (ioors from .'Friday and Saturday and thcnjcamc from the ranch with word Sunday he goes back to attcr heaviest ington and a scries of confer- fjgluing between the two I ences during the week on rc-jcneraics in VMrs Each ports from task forces ho [accused the ottor of named to come up willi ideas jlhc clasll mul each tor bettering the lot of Amen-'vjclon, U.S., Germany Approve Tighter Military Bonds his Cabinet Syrian communique planes flow across thei FOR CITY HALL Little Old Lady jFour Pacts Not Poor at All Sntiw !l Indies Al Sliondmi, in Wyoming, 11 ie drUlinK winds. The more than n mountains. The storm stum- was more in depth and was y I (3 I mile-an-hour -now piled up to f fool in UK- high also dipped into northwoKlcrn Colorado. The llv needed priTipiUifiwi fnilt'd to reach I lie pim'tied fields nf soulhonslrt'n Col- orado. Severe cold weal her followed (ho liwls of ihrj .storm. A rct'ord of IT) decrees 7t'ro for Iliis early (ialu was sol at Kly, Nov. Srasini in Hie and SmitlmL'sl wcro warned of nrdoiis road cnndilions as wind ijUists whipped the blowing .snow in f alii nt: tern pent tiit'os. The Weather Bureau described the Ktorni us tlie coldest of Ihc sea- son. Driving conditions were, par- ticularly hazardous in nor them and c-aslom Arizona where more lhan one1 inch of snow cov-: or eel the ground. At the Grand Canyon it was K decrees above. 70 ro Dry Area Vires Me.unvhile the drought, tin- tier-dry conditions anil forest fiu.-s conLimiod in soiuc areas. The body of a SH-yoar-olcl fire warden 'A as found Saturday by rescue tc-uni during a forest fin- Dial Inirued for two in ;t parched area near in Nni'ttu-asU'rn Pentisylviuiia. The fire bnrncd W.K) woodland ac.'i'es before beiiu; brought un- der control (iov. SYrunlon Saturday banin'ci and open fires in state forests. However, tin plans were made to I tie woods to hunlei least not until next wei'k. Bin in Massachusetts, the- woodlands were elosed lo the public because of (fie danger of fnresi fires idler the drought. There was a dra.stiv shortage of waler in many areas. Iti XIMV state, the woods clcsi (I in all hut ID fiitintic's, in VTiM Union, C'liio, a town of i Mule of iilcr riaK s.iirl only ahmil enough, for ;i remains. They to huilii n pipeline lo n (K'-ar lire Oliiti I'iglu or ten ;.wa> Centra! Rockies of Cold- ami I'lah uere hardest liit hy I lie csiern hturm where .snow fell for (Inn Ihini straight day Kv'sKN-rfs (if HriM sfnip- Uli-it ill ;i bbnkcl of iiK'lu'.v ot >mr.v. Aheail of Ihe western Morm. Wt'irni. ;iic si Mini iSei- STOini, 1IA) Turn Bandit', Council To Set After Flood Bond Issue .SAIGON, South Viet Nam f API The Communist Viet Corn; has turned from guer- rilla war in the jungles (o attacks cm convoys ami hel- icopter airlifts (o seize re- lief supples for flood victims along Viet iVatn's central const, U, S. aid of- ficials reported Saturday. With the death loll in five provinces mounting to an es- timated the Viet Cong are reported hoping to seize Ihe apparently for their own use, or (o turn over to the flood victims for projKiganda purposes. Guerrillas Attack A U. S. military advisers' compound -.it Quang Ngai city was attacked by Red guerrillas in search of food and ammunition Friday. No American casualties were reported in the automatic weapon and grenade attack. H.'impaguig floods may have destroyed the rice crop in (he central coastal re- gion and one U. S. official said about tons of rice would be needed until Iho next crop comes in. Mercy .Missions One problem for the mer- c> missions is that the Com- nninist.s control many of the ;ii'eas awash by floods. But a U. S. officials said; "Our intention is to see Hint rice and other relief does luit feed the Viet Cong." There was a report that Hie Viol Cong hull ordered Vietnamese in the Commu- nist-controlled areas to tear up their identity cards. lU'srue Cl'llU'rs I'. S. and South Vietnam- cso officials reported nvany flowing in to res- cue centers did not have idonlity cards to prove their loyally to the government. Some Americans cs- prr.sseil doubt Hull supplies vonld tu> kept fioin the Viet Corn; and its followers. I'locxlci! (.iirliiirclor 'aitsrs 825 to bases." In Tel Aviv, a military! spokesman denied any Israeli! plane was lost, said [our Syrian Soviet-made MIG2Is penetrated into Israel's air space, were driven off and one of (hem was; ihit. The spokesman said the hit on Ihc Syrian plane was clearly ed by the pilot who had igogcd it but thai it was not crash. Reliable sources in Damascus said the batllc was ]lol calling for supplementary irg ,he proposed architecture, j funds far the current paving iiociltion of the new facilities ..and drainage program. sitc o[ (he present city hall.j A report from the cttizcns Ad-'and calling of the bond election for a December dale. Goldwater Plans Study Of Defeat Mayor Kemper Williams said il will be his personal rec- ommendalion that a second pro- position be included on the elec- tion ballot covering thc supple- mentary funds, but declined to t minutes Friday with _, artillerv This battle d w Cn nopposc IsracH Ve and Ipoundcd Syrian batteries with napalm and gunfire. Even before Saturday's air clash, Syria moved to seek a U.N. Security Council meeting on the Friday fighting, and hadi to Is- broadcast this warning isay just how much money Ihis'rael: "The Syrian army is j might involve. Engineers [c (each Israel severe the city administration anci will not siop any ably were going over the cur- KINGSTON, Jamaica (API bond program and the re- NKW YOHK thought Mrs. Margaret Mary Fraser was a poor litllc old lady, but her will was full of surprises. She died Kcb. 18, in a SI, Luke's ilospilal ward because they thought she couldn't afford a private room. She was in her 70s. Dr. Louis Scarrone, be- lieving her indigent, had (rented her for Ihree years without evei1 sending a bill. She was Ihe widow of a British Hoyal Air Force colo- nel and lived alone in n midlown hotel. A friend recalled sho used lo gather up leftover food at dinner parties and take it lo her room. Rail Strike Prospects Discounted JOHNSON CITY, Tex. funds with a fine- jSen. Barry Goldwater said Sat-jmaining 'Urclay he would (wide survey of the liepublicanian j party to discover we beca'usc so many Republicans) On thc basis of previous in- ppublicanian exact determination in "reported it had lost three ak Monday's Council session. :kuled ami ninD wounded. more at Ihe limit of rcpellingi_ The prosDccts O'f a railroad on Nov. 23 have been greatly exaggerated, Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz sug- The ground fighting left seven Syrians dead and 26 wounded. (AP) :1 been A Forejgn Ministry had voted for the Democratic .formation released by the a svria's IJ.N. delegate, itn Dfncii-lriiif Inhncnn lintimunr thic inn nisi motif .X gested Saturday. advanced this view miking with newsmen afl- Now, lawyer llarold Bak- er, as executor, is distribut- ing the estate, estimated in Surrogate's Court al 000 cash plus a jewel collec- tion of uncstimalcd value. The .Sunday News, in a re- poit on her will, says Dr. Scarrone gets SI. Luke's gels Shu left to William Diamondslcin, supermark- et produce manager who was nice to her. Antionettc Bassini, one of her maids, gets Another maid, Rose Szauo, gets Her hairdressers, Bcrnicc Ellingsworlb and Rose Pit- lit-i, get each, the News reports. A bracelet with 138 sap- phires and 184 diamonds goes to a friend, Mrs. Lor- na P. O'Brien. Two society entertainers, sisters Sigfreda and Dag- mar N'ordslrom, were each left an 18 carat gold snake bracelet. The News reported Baker said there is plenty of funds on hand to lake care ot all the bequests. 'man aviiuo uviv-g however this Rafik -Asha had been bill could rim from [0 explore prospccts of to With the city a Council meet-, ul project pegged at this jng (akc up lnis scrious ]s-iroaciy lo walkout on most of the inrtfin (rttal VinviH i il-- I candidate, President Johnson. He said he wants to know why people who traditionally had j voted Republican acted as they did. cjuld mean a total bond issue He also said he is still op-j (Scc COUNCIL, Page HA) jposed to the civil rights bill be-j---------- cause he believes it is unconsti-' ituiionai. Boy Hi I. ii) Lye i Asked about his present post- jtion in the party, he said Ihej Jo I'l 111) llll   Patrolman Ko- A debtor is a man who owes money. A creditor is our who thinks he's going lo Scl il. machinists, hoilennakcrs. metal workers, a __., iSunriay and a.m. Me Tides (Port O'Connor, t.avaca Lows at Sunday and a.m. p.m. the "closest agreement was reached of any recent discus- sions by the ministers con- cerning the views related lo carmn and firemen, and Any walkout would affect the nation's major railroads except1: Monday I NATO forward defense." the Southern Railway Florida East Coast. and COMMON MARKET .Mary .Mini- Kriii'Uei1 home from Our l.aily of thc Lake Col- lege with n toolh ache, but re- turning tmlay with her parents. Air. ami Mis. Knie- ger who an.1 headed fur Ihc hill niiinlry and Ihe Milton (iiveMiiis heailini! fur Ihe Hill (.'mmlry also Ivy their luint- ing skills since it's thai lime of year Mrs. Troy Harris (vie- hraling n birthday today iiiul jninini! family al the Albert Howard home. incUulini', the Wayne Harris family of Vono- v.ui'iii Mrs, Mudisnn llailc> French Concessions Ii ,ase Tariff Discord fngio formerly nf Victoria, in (own In simp Mi'1-. Minnie Scull taking lime now ami Ihen for community service and ox- plaining service hroailens one's ulllliuil: Kc'l Mahlc Miller hnpinc, I" hag on the first vseekeml so Hint can "loaf" llu1 rest of (lie Snmlru Mnr- and Danny lllllin' busy wilh wcililiiu! plans for Nov. Ihc dale heini! liMcd inein reel- IV ill n reeeul iicciiunt of euur- Irak's eMcinlcd Hie In iilc elecl, I11UISSICI.S, Sunday (AP) An iigrremi'iil appeared close iil[ the iCiiropcan Common Market early Sunday on meeting Ihe laic" I're.sukHil Kennedy's chal- lenge for :i worldwide ntlack on barriers lo trade. As midnight passed, ministers anil delegates were slill argil-! 'infi. bul spokesmen said a final deal was in the making on just wlinl tariffs the six members wen.1 ready In have cut m as the late ('resident urged, and Monday in Geneva. Yet to he settled is a list of Common Mar- ket products lo be exempt from tariff cuts. The battle was joined on the main fciilnre of Uie late Presi- dent John F. Kennedy's plan to take Ihc customs duties that bold back trade among the world's nations nnd slice as many as possible in half. For example, if the Kennedy round (if tariff lalks succeed, a small German car that costs 500 would have to pay only J1H.75 duty when il lands in New standing firmest for a long list] of exceptions In the tariff cut, were icporleil making conces- sions on machinery the major ilcm in fhe dispute. I'Yimce anil Germany Ihe duct anlagonisls. The U.S. has agreed to build, in private American shipyards, three guided-missile destroyers for the German Navy. The first of the ships should be ready for delivery in 1969. Estimates of the cost for the three ships, which the Germans Iwill pay for, are understood to at sea 30.01. Sunset Sunday p.m. Sunrise Monday a.m. Precipitation: Saturday .02; for the month, .50; for the year, 31.11. EUremes for this date: High 89 in 1027; low 20 in 1916. This Intormancm tused on irom tht u.s Weather Bureau be in the neighborhood of SloO (See PACTS, Page HA) MILLION TOYS Costly Chicago Fire Injures 44 Firemen CHICAGO (AP) Forty-four severe drought and less than firemen were injured and anjonc-half inch of raiti has fallen estimated million dollars worthjjn the past 45 days. of Christmas toys and goodsi warehouse. n c.oldblalt, president Most of the city's firemen and Ro1.lhlal. were sounded for two other blazes nt an empty warehouse fire began in the .too by ,nd a railroad loading dock basement of the ware- hc weary firemen were again aml' b-v an early Tln> Ki-inu'dy round ol Inlks iiimiing Ihc world's lending Irad-i cr.s on cutting .ariffs American car worlh would linve to pay duty in Hamburg Inslend of something like today. The fight wilhln Hie. Common Market was over a Julnl lisl ol exceptions, due lo be doposUed in Geneva im Monday along willi similar lists (rum other big Iriiillng countries. IINITKI) I'UNIl 'I'KMl'KUA'L'UHK Ken Nathan, furcgvoutui, cnrnptiiRti I'luunnan of thc Victoria Cininly United Kiiml, pnlnts (he United Fund lliermomclcT in DcLcon Plnxn lo tlic '27.ii per cotU mark which lias been ic'iicliod toward (lie of Iov HI The ilrivc about two wocks ago. Then1 aiT slill two divisions lo solicitations. The Kcncnil division will hold ils kickoff luncheon at noon Tuesday nt Tolah's Fine Foods. The area division begins work Inter in thc week. Ted Reed, left, bnsincs.s- professiounl chairman, and D. G, Al- brct'lil. one of the advance gifts sec- tion chairmen, liiok on. (Advocate I'lioln) (he weary firemen were agair called into action. noon Saturday, a fire dc-; partmenl official said all three! fires were under control and arson squads were on the scenes. The latest outbreaks brought to five the number of major (ires lluit have broken out on the Koutti Side in November. morning gas line explosion, (Sir I'lliK. Piigc IN AtlToJoyy 10 A FAIIII 'FO.V T-H SporM VI N I'mtiword FUN A fi A The city has been plagued by   

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