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Advocate Newspaper Archive: October 17, 1964 - Page 1

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Publication: Advocate

Location: Victoria, Texas

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   Advocate (Newspaper) - October 17, 1964, Victoria, Texas                                Victoria.....20 Kay.........12 Keuedy.....20 York Iowa 0 Kinviii......35 Si. Joseph 16 San Marcos H5 Cuero 0 Yoakuni.....7 Industrial 6 Kiiigsvillc 10 Miller .......8 Goliad Taf t...... Garland CatTolllon 34 6 35 0 Hallcttsvillc 26 Luling..... Galena Park 21 LaMai'ijue 14 Dulles Calhoim Sp. Branch North poll THE VICTORIA ADVOCATE 119th 163 TELEPHONE HI 5-1-iil VICTORIA, TEXAS, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1964 Soviet Rulers Make Gesture Of Friendship Eventual Summit Hinted In Reply From Johnson WASHINGTON (AP) The new rulers of the Soviet Union made a quick diplomatic bid Friday for friendly relations the United States. President 14 Cents Architects Interviewed At College Auditorium Plans Made By HENRY WOLFF, JR. Advocate Slaff Writer Representatives of three at-! cbitcclural firms were inter- viewed Friday afternoon during a called meeting of the Victo- ria College board of trustees concerning plans of the school (o build a combination audito- rium and fine arts building fi- nanced by the issuance of 000 in revenue bonds. After hearing the representa- tives discuss their respective firms, experiences in this type of architecture and other fac tors relating to (he building plans, the trustees decided lo give some thought to the appli- cations and to call a meeting later to make a decision. Appearing before the board were Chris DiStefano, who has offices here and in Houston; J. C. Aiill and Robert Kick, of thoh Victoria office of Ault Rick, and Bill Klolz of Uie en- gineering firm of Lockwood, An- drews and Newnam here, who introduced Cecil Steward and W. R. Matthews, both of W. Mathews Associates which isi serve the cause of peace Communists detonated engineering' international understanding." "low-yield" nuclear test and fm. Matt hews pans to open Officials subsequently dis- significance! a, ehitcclural office here with Johnson responded cordially, and cautiously opened the way for an eventual East-West summit meeting. Acting on instructions from Moscow, Soviet Am- bassador Anatoly F. called al Ihe White House late j Friday morning and told tlie President thai the Soviet foreign policy of "strengthening peace, peaceful coexistence countries wilh different systems, and furthei lion of tensions" will sland un-'-m t i changed despite Ihe departure Vf 111 111117041 Premier Khrushchev. Assurance Welcomed f WASHINGTON (AP) Prcsi- Johnson "welcomed (his Johnson said Friday there (lie President himself is no reason (o fear that Red laler announced in a statement, China's exploding of an atomic and said the Soviet governmental boml) "could lead to immc- "could relv on the danger of war-" lion of the United States" to: confirmed thai Ihe Atom Blast ,i ce among! O Srent social] By 01111686 ler relaxa-l J of School Board Re-Vote Again in Favor of CPL New Shots Fired On Power Pact By PAT WITTE Advocate Staff Writer Representatives of the Cenlral Power and Light and the Victoria County Electric Co-op wheeled :lieir big guns into aciion ai a called meeting of Hie Victoria Independent. School District's Board of Trus- tees Friday, and when the firing was over the trustees voted again to award the power contract to the new school in Highland Estaies closed thai Johnson also made! clear lo Dobrynin what he has said publicly on various occa- sions: thai he is willing lo go anywhere at any time and un- dertake any aciion which will advance the cause of overestimated." the possibility of an East-West summit conference. The President said in a broad- cast statement that it may re- quire many years and much dif- ficult effort before the Chinese acquire a stockpile of nuclear them. Stales is prepared to i any calls from non-Communist neighbors of China for "help is a against threats or aggression." The Symbolic Meeting Dobrynin-Johnson meel- ing was symbolic. It served as a first answer to the question of what kind of relations do Leonid I. Brezhnev and Alcxci N. Kosygin, who have succeed- ed Khrushchev, want with the Uniled Slates. Dobrynin and Johnson played their roles for maximum emphasis on the sym- bolism of U.S.-Soviet Coopera- tion. Officials said privately lhat they don't quite know what this means for the future but for the present it is encouraging, in Ihe followed these lines of thinking: t- For the Chinese to make the transition from the first ex- periment to practical weapons may take anywhere from a half Steward staffing it. Presents Prospects i Also appearing before the! board was Ray Tbomasnia of Huss Co. of San Antonio, (net (firm which is handling bond proceedings on llie project. He presented a prospectus prepared by his firm based an a figure the board decided was in line with the "approximatc- jly it had approved originally as the cost of the pro- posed structure. Thomasma suggested the BAGS FOR SHOW Rock and mineral specimens are shown above being packed in small paper bags for the Hobby Show, sponsored by the Victoria Gem and Mineral Society, to be held Saturday and Sun- day at Patti Welder gymnasium. From left are Mrs. Joe Young, Mrs. Walter A. Hennig, and Joe A. Stock- ton, all members of the society. The bags will he sold for 25 cents each during the show. (Advocate Pholo) to a whole decade. Firs! Menace 2. The nations neighboring Communist China, not the Unit- ed face the first menace of Peking's entry into Die nuclear weapon field be- cause China must create oi1 pro- cure planes or missiles to de- liver weapons more than a rela- tively short distance. 3. But oven so, American al- in Formosa, Korea, South Gem Show Sold To Begin T 11 r ul always brisk. At one point, Attorney John Dorris, representing only him- but speaking in behalf of co-op, said that Iruslees is an ec- NMM stn-jcc icenls per pound at the Junior PORT LAVACA Becky] Livestock Exhibitors a u c I i o n Dykes Grand Champion Friday afternoon. pound Hereford steer was pur y and' gymnasium, host of entries, a number of them from at Palti i sizable out of town, have been entered. Four trophies are to be awarded. They are for best club display, the revenue bonds, were thenlhesl lapidary, best of show in set at or per semesterilhe lapidary field, and best gen- hour, for in-county students wholeral display. light of Johnson's policy of seek-'Vlet >N'am !'nd Japan can come would slill pay the same tui- tion as in past years. Point on New Rales The bond consultant said Ihere was some question aboul ing accommodations with theiunt'er tlle alomic gim when the) the new rates and suggested re ings Loan Association for 75 board scl aside present funds! and Mineral Society will be held chased by Coastal Bend Sav- adequale to pay off re- Salurda niaining on dormitory bonds and keep the present tuition rate. The board decided previously, tu cut oul-of-county tuition from SCO to a semester, adding! a building usage fee for these students. New building) usage fees, which will pay off Students Lydia Woluneycr's 821-pound reserve champion Angus steer was purchased by Ed Mclchei Co., and Terry Hunch Motors at G5 cents per pound. Carol Janis' 230-pound grand 'champion duroe was purchased 337 To En lei1 Cl Some 337 students from anct area high schools will be com-lcenls I by the First National Bank al to ask ;75 ccnls per pound. Jcdlick's DH- self the should bear in mind that their decision should be based only on economic, and not political, factors. "It is a poor Dor- ris said, "to award the contract to CPL because it. pays higher taxes lo the school district than the co-op docs." "Now bold on just onomic judgement, not a politi- cal one. You are bore to exer- cise sound business judgement." a shot back R. D. Smilh Jr., dis- trict manager of CPL. "I'd like you a couple of nues- Mr. and Mrs. Ben Milam for spots on (he all-re- show chairmen for the Ciemigional choir at the Region and Mineral Society. Judging will be held lions, and 1 hope they won't em- barass you. First of all, are you roc was purchased by same John Dorris who has at paid his personal properly laxes since 1 smiled Dorris. "Do you think lhat gives you Tom Southern's 131-pound was purchased byj jchoir tryouls scheduled at E- B. Food Stores for lllc Kcl nere from Soviet Union by international j first combat-capable weapons' agreement lare ready. And US. forces are In vivid' contrast to the Eome of lhose na- lure of Dobrvnin and and are cruising adjacent scils' shaking hands al the executive! office entrance were headlines; telling of Red China's of a nuclear test bomb. than !'J U.S. government confirmed (he when "'e Wcstcrn reports and evalu- ,'alioii of such information was 1949 blast somewhere in western China and said il was of "low! yield." News of Bomb News of the Red Chinese ex-; ploit, making the vast Red giant of Asia a fledgling member of the nuclear power club, reached caught by surprise by Ihe Soviet Page 5) IM 1-1'3'' l I f' lte'L l" Vj rni' 1 l) Hlate Johnson-: 10 a.m. until noon Saturday, but during these same hours, taining the old ouUif-countylgroups of school children ac and in-county rates for full- time students, adding a per semester hour building usage fee to these. The board authorized 10 p.m. companied by a sponsor will be admitted free The show will be toria High School Saturday. Bobby Willmann's Southdown, speak for Ihe rest of these tax- Smilh ouos- William G. Baskin, head was 'chased by Zwcrschkc and son l'ollcd. "Yes I Dorris said, "he- said 80 regional berths! uc uaull's "-pound ''ve my real prop- filled during Ihe V.UH1 A i i. Of Ihe 110 noon, and will remain open un-jbertlis, 32 will he selected the choral department al Vic- toria High and director of thei meet, a n h r others transfer of funds necessary to take care of the dormitory bonds. It will vole al a later Sunday hours for the show will be from 10 a.m. lo 6 p.m. General admission lo the jciindidates for the all-slate try- date on the changing of thejshow be 50 cents for adults (See COLLEGE, Page 5) land 25 ccnls for children. STAGE MOSAIC AUSTIN (AP) the House while Johnson, Humphrey Headquarters said (See RUUHIS. Page 5) j Friday President Johnson's sud-l [den cancellation of appearances; jSunday in Laredo and Corpus iChrisli docs not alter his other i Texas campaign plans for Sun- day and Monday. William Hunter McLean, state director of the President's eam- ipaign, issued a statement thai Johnson's schedule still calls for Irips Monday to San Antonio, collection to present (o n Worth, Houston and Dal- by drilling rig thai has ous squeaky moments Mrs.j Als0i McLoim there is M. D. Sloncr will visit her crange in plans for the state- ter Mrs. Nina Carter, 1105 State1. widc fund-raising dinner honor- Slreet, Big Spring, for an ex-; jng the President in Dallas Mon- tended lime Mrs. Cecil day night. Kneip planning lo be oul early' lo help with the Bon Ami Home Demonstration Club Rummage Sale, 7 p.m. City Hall Square. Miss Jnnicc Foreman, daughter rain, and offering lo take up WEATHER Clear to partly cloudy and of Mr. anil Mrs. T. 0. Forman.jmild Saturday through Sunday. home from (he hospital and do- ing well Snuffy I.orlon hav Southerly winds 8-18 m.p.h. Ex- pected Saturday temperatures: enjoying Low 61, high 87. Ihe an-i Soulh Cenlral Texas: Clear to ing a reputation for crossword puzzles nual Scout Carnival for cloudy Saturday and Sun- inglon will be held High Saturday 82-92. night al_6 p.m. at the Bloom-i High Friday 85, low 55. Lavaca-Porl inglon Fire Deparlmenl Tides (Port .1 e s s c Ramsey doing s o m e O'Connor Lows at "wishful" Blinking aboul and p.m. highs al fishing trip Milton Schcu.; p.m. and a.m. Sun- make discovered by friends at day. a new place of business Harvey Beard stopping for early lunch Lorcne Hud-; dock wishing for a cold norther Airs. F. Burns to ccle-; brale a birthday today. Barometric pressure at sea an level: 29.94. Sunset Saturday sunrise Sunday This IMijrmaiiun based on data .from the U.S. Weather Bureau IviclorU Office. 'Auntie Maine' Both Hilarious Touchin Eleanor Ann Ocrrarri came back to the Trail of Six Flags Theatre stage after an unduly long absence Friday evening, and knitted together a theatrical mosaic of a madcap woman that was alternately hilarious and touching, wilh bits of the ridi- culous scattered at random. Because it is indeed a stage mosaic, "Auntie Maine" gets off its mark very slowly and it is around Scene 8 of (he 12 scenes in Act I before the pic- ture begins lo take shape. But from there on it is a sheer de- light and a personal triumph for Mrs. Gerrard. And when it is over, the three hours running time has been exceedingly well spent. Kxcept for special attention by Director Charles McCally and his stage managers, Jim Sillerle and Don Crow, the play would have consumed more than the allotted three hours. And Uie rush backstage to accomplish the many scene changes pro- duced more audible floor-scrap- ing than usual at Friday night's opening, and occasionally result- ed in stage crew and members of the cast being down cenler at almost, the same time. It didn't mar the product ap-i prcciably. ivjb U u I f (.c- outs scheduled in Victoria Dec. c Coastal Bend Savings and r its purchase would be Judges for the iryouls will be to Mrs. yirginra Food of Kllnd_ H ,j thur High School of San Anton- io, Mrs. Esther Trulson of thei......___A Edgewood (San Antonio) School! District, Mrs. Mary Jo fi'VCtf son of Carroll High School of'._ Corpus Van Hale of Ga- lena Park High School, and Ira; Bowles, head of Ihe music de- partment of Southwest Texas State College at San Marcos. Here are the schools enlering Ihe mecl, wilh thc number of students representing each, As always, Ihe sets were ceptionally well conceived Bill Dewey, and Ibe set ;Ba> tions in "Auntie Maine's" Beev ment, executed by Ralph Virginia Howard were Can- in touch with thc psychosis that passes 23. Mame's Lighting was jumpy, but this was sated in Ihe final scene wilh a excellent bit of work, and all lighting design by Mutschler unobslrusively de plemented the lavish sets st mysU More than most plays, Mame" offers a broad field individual accomplishment p Director McCally got the ar oul of a number of people youngsters and beginners lie d veterans of the local of Young Sam Bailey IV in moments of striking appeal the orphaned 10-year-old (Sce PLAY, Page has loria I tr and he ass Abhy AJtrology rdlforla] rei Blithi Gortn Church hou ClaiUMtd ...IMM Spotu Comlci 1 Television CroMMfd wt County of Rockporl, 17; A. C. Jonesihooks whlcl matter of principle, why don't we be frank about it and ad- mit it if we don't like Ihe Ragan answered, "Yes, il is thai principle lhat governs my actions. I don't sec how we can separate that principle from Ihe economic factors. From the smallest political enlily (and -n non-paying post on a school >oard is about as small as you can go) lo Ihe Congress of the United Stales, every decision should be based on a principle of some kind. It bothers me that you think we can forget about .hat principle." "Hul this is not a partisan Cullen said. "You should leave out Ihe political ispect." again took (h floor. You certainly have Ihe righl your he told Rag- "aml 1 don't think anything less of yon or Ihe board for ex- pressing il. Bnl I would like to invite your attention to certain other subsidies we can find all around us. It would be hard (o :ind any business or any indi- vidual who doesn't get these benefits, whether ils in the form of a ship channel acro.is Mal- igorda Bay or a liarge Canal o Victoria. We all share in these benefits." Smith, the lone spokesman for CPL, said he was appear- ing before the board for the first time, and that his firm had "exerted no influence" over the jboard. "I understood that we al- religious had Ihe he concerted attack on three biologyjpapcr, said the books are discuss the theory books in complete atheistic ma-i "I have not prepared any champion capon of tllc Texas Toduy's Chuckle Today a girl marries fnr keeps she keeps house and keeps on working. Matlette said was in the oesl interests of tlie board lo economize, for the benefit of the taxpayers. "We're entitled to know why the board has reject- ed (he low bid." Later, he said, "If Ihis is a Textbook Panel 01 Controversial Books AUSTIN1 a fl; Calhoun of Porl of evolution at lenfjlh, the 'rale eslimales, because it would Textbook Committee rccom-l Lemmons is generally held lo necessarily be based on guesses f-ininn'-IR- fnlnrl 9K-' pV volumes Fridiiv started thc outcry against in, VJIJILdU, 1 .1- vl; rt and 2-5; Victoria, 9S; Whar- public school use. The books were ill ai" hearing Wednesday as "alhcis- and as an attempt lo [dodrinale young people wilhj Darwin's cenlury-old theory. j The 15-mcmber committee's i" recommendation, issuwl without! Texas Rangers and the sher-icomment, goes to (he elected ff's department Friday nighljStale Board of Education, which' were still investigating the Oct. has the final say on books for healing of Mrs. the free public school textbook fSrc HOOKS. S) estimates. There is really (Sir VOTK, Blanco Warburton, 88, of Bloom-! persons reportedly have program. Recommended for use in high school biology courses School Biology" were SUNDAY PREVIEW Those Kusdtmtiiig (Vliat makes a person go out anif lank for rocks? When does one become a rockliound, and why? Read of the fas- cination and challenge oflcrtd by this intrreslintf hobby in .Sunday's Kun Magazine. It nlso includes information aliont the Victoria Gem and Mineral Society llnbby .Show, nmv in Tuesday when two were cleared McNally "Biological .Sci- by lie detector tests at Dcpart-lcncc: An Inquiry into Life" ment of Public Safety headtjiiar-'Hnrcotirt, Brace and World) ;and "Biological Science: Mnle- Sheriff M. to Man" (Houghton Mifflin Marshall said that Mrs. Thc three wore developed ton has been released from Vic-jat a cost of S-r> million by the Na- loria Hospital where she .Science Foundation. F.ach treated for massive facexfevolcs considerable space lo wounds inflicted by [Charles Darwin's theory of evo- hnr hilinn progress. Latest Opus TrouNul her assailant who broke inlo her lution. At an all-day hearing lhat a standing-room-only residence at -1 a.m. remained inside the home drew hours later when two younglcrowd Wednesday, Rend Lem- arrived to inquire oboutjmons, Church of Christ evangc- Two full of the Fun Magazine will be devoted lo books. If Ihe render is interested in history, there is :i re- view nn The American Heritage History of World War 7. On the lighter siilc, Helen Curlcy Brown's latest opus is treated lightly. Volrr Infoi'iiiiilion Three proposed changes In the State Constitution arc. discussed in nn article appearing in Sunday's Victoria Ad- vocate. These propositions, which bavo stirred up little de- bate. arc important, nevor-llic-Iess. The arliclo lets you know what they are all about, 'i t   

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